Amazing No-Knead Bread: Step-by-step recipe

by Emily from Frugal Living NW on January 26, 2012

Simple no-knead bread recipe

If you have been hanging out around Frugal Living NW for awhile, you know that I am a big believer in making food from scratch at home. With a few exceptions, I prefer creating something in my own kitchen to buying it in the grocery store.

Bread can be tricky, though. There is some stiff competition out there, and it is tough to replicate a commercial oven’s heat and steam in a normal home kitchen.

For the last several years, I thought that Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes was the best thing since, well, sliced bread. It was simple, and we were content with the results. That is, until last summer when our neighbor brought over a beautiful, delicious loaf of home-baked bread. We had to know her secret. One phone call, and she came back with the book, My Bread by Jim Lahey (Amazon).

No-knead bread recipe

We have been baking bread using this method ever since. I can count on one hand the number of times I have bought bread in the store since then, because I can now make an artisan-quality loaf at home for a fraction of the cost.

I am telling you, this is consistently the best bread I have ever made in my kitchen. Ok, enough gushing. Let’s make some bread.

The only changes I have made to Lahey’s method is to double the amounts and adjust the baking time and temperature to achieve a bigger loaf with a thinner crust. Oh, and don’t be put off by all these steps. This is totally possible for home bakers at any skill level. I wanted to give you the confidence to do this on your own. A concise recipe can be found at the bottom of this post.

No-knead bread recipe

The ingredients are simple: flour, water, salt, and yeast. My husband calculated this bread costs .74/loaf (using Bob’s Red Mill flour & Costco yeast).

Oh, wait! Don’t forget to factor in the roughly 8 cents of energy used to bake it for an hour. No, I’m serious. My husband really does think about this stuff! He’s funny. So, there you go. A whopping 81 cents for a substantial 2.5 pound loaf of bread. That is crazy cheap.

Whole wheat no-knead bread recipe

If you want to use some whole wheat flour, substitute 3 cups of whole wheat for 3 cups of the all-purpose flour (3 cups whole wheat and 3 cups of unbleached flour for a total of 6 cups) and add 3 Tablespoons of molasses (optional). This will produce a slightly sweeter, denser loaf of bread. Delicious.

No-knead bread recipe

Combine the dry ingredients, add the water, and stir to combine (the funky looking wood-handled item is the amazing Danish Dough Wisk — makes stirring stiff dough a snap). The dough should be wet and sticky. Depending on the temperature and humidity in your home, you may need to add a little more flour or water, 1 Tablespoon at a time. So far, these steps are exactly the same as the 5 Minute method.

The main differences are that you use significantly less yeast (1/2 teaspoon vs.  1 1/2 Tablespoons) and significantly more initial rise time (12-18 hours vs. 2 hours).

Simple no-knead bread recipe

Once the ingredients are completely combined, cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave it on the counter to rise for 12-18 hours. This slow rise aids in the fermentation of the yeast, giving the bread a better flavor.

Ok, I know what some of you are thinking: 12-18 hours! That’s ridiculous! Who has that kind of time?! I get it.

However, here are two things to consider:

  1. Once you get into a rhythm of baking your own bread, it’s not a big deal. I start mine in the afternoon or evening and bake it the next morning or afternoon. This would also be an easy weekend routine.
  2. Just like the title claims, this bread requires no kneading. It is not fussy, temperamental dough. You can produce a delicious loaf of bread with very little hands-on effort & experience.

You’ll know your dough is ready when it has risen in the bowl, smells yeasty, darkened slightly, and is covered with small bubbles.

Using well floured hands, shape and tuck the sticky dough into a rough ball. You can also fold it over a couple times on a well-floured surface. It doesn’t have to be perfect; just keep quickly tucking the dough underneath with your fingertips until you have a semi-smooth dough ball. The dough should be wet but manageable; you don’t want a wet blob so sticky that you can’t shape it into a ball.

Simple no-knead bread recipe

Take a clean cotton or linen (not terry cloth) tea towel and dust it with flour, cornmeal, or wheat germ to prevent the dough from sticking to the towel as it rises. You can also use a floured square of parchment paper on the towel to make the dough ball easier to handle. Place the dough ball, seam side down, in the middle and dust with more flour.

No-knead bread recipe

Cover the dough with the (parchment paper and) towel and let it rise for 1-2 hours at room temperature, until doubled in size. During the last 30 minutes of rise time, place a heavy lidded 6-8 quart pot, like a Dutch oven, in a cold oven and preheat it to 425 degrees.

Confession: I own 3 Dutch Ovens. I use them all the time. They are incredibly versatile and worth the investment. If you don’t own one, you could also make this in any lidded pot, provided it is oven-safe at such high temperatures. Also, check the knob on your pot. If it isn’t rated for such high heat, you’ll want to remove it or cover it with foil.

Okay, this is the trickiest part of the entire operation. Remove the lid from the piping hot Dutch Oven, slide your hand underneath the towel or parchment paper, and flip the risen dough (seam side up now) into the pot. Try to flip close to the pot or the flour will fly everywhere. Remove the towel or paper and set aside.

This might take a bit of practice, but again it doesn’t have to be perfect. Some of my worst flips have produced my most beautiful loaves. I love what Lahey writes, “…even the loaves that aren’t what you’d regard as perfect are way better than fine.”

Place the lid back on top and slide the pot back into the hot oven.

No-knead bread recipe

Bake it for 40-50 minutes. Remove the lid. Bake for another 5-10 minutes, until golden chestnut brown. The internal temperature should be around 200 degrees. You can check this with a meat thermometer if you’re nervous about knowing when your loaf is done.

Oh man, your house will smell so good about right now.

Simple no-knead bread recipe

Place the loaf on a cooling rack. You will hear it crackling as it cools. Use every ounce of self-control to resist cutting into it until it is “quiet”; cutting it too soon will make the bread dense and gummy.

Simple No-knead bread recipe

This bread is best the first 2-3 days. I just store my leftover loaf inside the Dutch oven on the countertop. Using plastic wrap will soften the crust. Dry, leftover bread makes great bread crumbs, toast, French toast, or croutons!

Enjoy. And pat yourself on the back. You just baked an amazing loaf of bread!

No-knead bread recipe

Basic No-Knead Bread
slightly adapted from Jim Lahey’s My Bread

6 cups bread flour (recommended) or all-purpose flour, plus more for work surface
1/2 t. instant or active-dry yeast
2 1/2 t. salt
2 2/3 c. cool water

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, yeast, and salt. Add the water and stir until all the ingredients are well incorporated; the dough should be wet and sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest 12-18 hours on the counter at room temperature. When surface of the risen dough has darkened slightly, smells yeasty, and is dotted with bubbles, it is ready.
  2. Lightly flour your hands and a work surface. Place dough on work surface and sprinkle with more flour. Fold the dough over on itself once or twice and, using floured fingers, tuck the dough underneath to form a rough ball.
  3. Generously dust a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with enough flour, cornmeal, or wheat bran to prevent the dough from sticking to the towel as it rises; place dough seam side down on the towel and dust with more flour, cornmeal, or wheat bran. Cover with the edges or a second cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours, until it has doubled in size.
  4. After about 1 1/2 hours, preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place a 6-8 quart heavy covered pot, such as a cast-iron Dutch oven, in the oven as it heats. When the dough has fully risen, carefully remove pot from oven. Remove top towel from dough and slide your hand under the bottom towel; flip the dough over into pot, seam side up. Shake pan once or twice if dough looks unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes.
  5. Cover and bake for 40 minutes. Uncover and continue baking for 10-15 more minutes, until the crust is a deep chestnut brown. The internal temperature of the bread should be around 200 degrees. You can check this with a meat thermometer, if desired.
  6. Remove the bread from the pot and let it cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

Simple No-knead bread recipe

Got questions? You are in good company. Go here for the complete FAQ list.

Here are a couple options for Dutch Ovens. Any heavy, lidded 5-8 quart pot (seasoned cast iron or enamel coated) would work with this recipe. Lodge has the best prices/options for dutch ovens on Amazon.

Lodge Logic Dutch Oven in Island Spice Red (6 Quart)

Lodge Logic Pre-Seasoned Dutch Oven with Loop Handles (5 Quart)

Find more frugal homemaking posts here and a list of amazing recipes here.

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{ 1004 comments… read them below or add one }

Kendra September 6, 2014 at 5:20 pm

I use corningware and my bread turns out perfect every time

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margot September 6, 2014 at 8:21 am

Hi — hey FYI the Le Creuset pot knobs are only rated to 375°F

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Kate from Frugal Living NW September 6, 2014 at 8:49 am

And the new Lodge knobs are now rated to 500 degrees so it’s okay to purchase the Lodge dutch oven with the current knob.

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Dave August 24, 2014 at 10:33 am

Ruth: You don’t need the second step. My post is way down in the thread, but I noted that I skip the second step and it works just as well. Just mix the dough, cover it, let it rise overnight (up to about 24 hours), dust it with flour as you loosen it from the bowl, and roll the soft ball of dough into the pre-heated pot. Again: NO SECOND RISE!

Just mix it, and bake it 12 to 24 hours later.

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Lisa August 24, 2014 at 3:47 am

Making this again today. This is my second time. Used half A/P flour and half whole wheat. Came out amazing the first time. LOVE this recipe!!!!

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Ruth August 24, 2014 at 3:47 am

Well i made the dough and it seemed very sloppy. Had it doing the second rise wrapped in the tea towel. All good but later found my cat sitting on it!!! Well after desticking it from the towel and getting it back to a bit of a rounded shape – she did it again!! I just put it in the preheated pot and guess what – it turned out just like the pics. It seems that this bread is indestructable – and tastes great too ;)

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Lisa August 24, 2014 at 3:49 am

That is hysterical!!! Glad it came out good.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 24, 2014 at 2:40 pm

Ha, love it! As far as I know, this is the only recipe I’ve posted that doubles as a cat bed. You and your cat have great taste. :)

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Kim August 23, 2014 at 8:52 pm

Can you use a bread bowl instead and cover it foil?

We bought a bread bowl just to make bread in, so I’m wondering if this would work as well as a dutch oven.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 23, 2014 at 9:22 pm

Only if you’re able to cook in it with temperatures this high.

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angela August 22, 2014 at 4:41 pm

This turned out so perfect. when i took the lid off i was so amazed! thank you for this amazing recipe!

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rachel August 20, 2014 at 6:15 pm

wow. I was totally skeptical about this recipe when I saw how sticky the dough was. I added a lot of flour to try to rectify this, to no avail. I almost scraped the whole idea but I decided to just throw the somewhat gloopy dough into my cast iron dutch oven (pre heated as specified), thinking it would never come out and/or would burn and am happy to report this bread came out AWESOME!!! The crust is amazing. Artesian bakery quality! The best loaf of this type I have made. I do bake bread occasionally and it feels so wrong to not knead :) but it works! Thanks for sharing!

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Jennifer August 17, 2014 at 8:10 am

Has anyone tried this with glutten free flour? Became glutten free 4 months ago due to medical reasons. This would be the easiest recipe I fould yet if it works with gluten free flour.

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Lisa August 16, 2014 at 12:50 pm

Are you supposed to oil the pot? Trying this today.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 16, 2014 at 10:45 pm

Nope, no need.

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Stuart August 14, 2014 at 2:19 pm

Made this yesterday and can’t believe how amazing it is , it is without doubt the easiest bread ever , and some of the best I have ever had !!!

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Carol August 2, 2014 at 8:10 am

I love this bread! I even bought an enamel over cast Dutch oven and it’s so easy! I’m thinking of trying the cinnamon and raisins for my third loaf because Cupcake said it was good! Thank you for sharing this!

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Kristina July 21, 2014 at 9:22 pm

This last Thanksgiving I made it for my host. Their very picky 6 year old daughter was DISTRAUGHT there was no ‘Safeway’ bread (grocery store). We finally talked her into just trying a bite of my bread.

She had 4 huge pieces with some of my fresh made butter… and nothing else, not even turkey. Now each time I go over there she has her mom ask me to bring the “Special Bread”.

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Morgan July 21, 2014 at 5:42 pm

Any suggestions to making this without a dutch oven? I’m about to move across the country and can’t bring mine!

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Kate from Frugal Living NW July 21, 2014 at 8:50 pm

some have tried a covered pyrex dish? Might be worth a shot.

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Kristina July 21, 2014 at 9:07 pm

I don’t use a dutch oven. I use my big old soup pot with the lid that came with it.

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Jann July 23, 2014 at 4:11 am

When I halve the recipe I always switch to my covered Pyrex casserole. I do reduce the heat to about 390 and cook it a little longer using an instant read thermometer to make sure it is done. Never had a failure or a burned loaf.

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Terri D. June 29, 2014 at 1:20 pm

Can I bake this in my covered clay baker (Pampered Chef Chicken cooker)?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW June 30, 2014 at 7:46 am

A clay baker would work, as long as it’s rated for high heat. It should be listed online or in the manual.

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andrea June 26, 2014 at 8:57 am

is the bread dense or airy? every time i try to make bread, it comes out dense.

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Kristina July 21, 2014 at 9:10 pm

The way I make it, it always seems similar to the old school rye bread we got from the local bakery when I was a kid.

I LOVE IT!

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Alicia June 26, 2014 at 8:51 am

Question … could this be made with beer instead of water?

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Ange June 21, 2014 at 8:31 am

Love Jim’s bread recipe. I have many new friends since I started making artisan bread and giving it as gifts! The only thing different that I do than what you do, is that I let the dough rise on a piece of parchment paper and put paper and dough into heated cast iron pot. So much easier for me. Thanks for a GREAT informational post!

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Steph June 19, 2014 at 11:12 am

I have a very small dutch oven – 2 3/4 qt to be exact. Should I just quarter the recipe?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW June 19, 2014 at 7:33 pm

I’d try just cutting the recipe in half. If you’re nervous, you could start with 1/4, then go up from there…

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kelly June 8, 2014 at 5:35 am

Thank you for the picture of the first rising. I would have thought the first rising wasn’t complete without it. It doesn’t look rounded on top; that’s okay!

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Eileen May 30, 2014 at 9:25 am

I didn’t oil my pot. I have a beautiful loaf of bread stuck in my pot :(

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Kate from Frugal Living NW May 30, 2014 at 10:02 am

Run a spatula around the outside and set the pot on it’s side for 15 minutes and then rotate to the other side. It will slowly release as the steam builds underneath the bread. You might have some of the bottom stick but you’ll be able to get it out.

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Cherylann May 24, 2014 at 3:17 pm

I baked this bread a few hours ago…some of the best ever.
Thanks for the recipe, photos and explanations. I will be making this a lot.

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Claudia May 23, 2014 at 3:59 am

The recipe looks really nice but I just have a clay baker at home. Do you think it will work nonetheless? Because in a clay baker the temperature shouldn’t go up a lot higher than 200 °F either.

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Maria April 22, 2014 at 10:55 am

When ready to work the dough I put it on parchment paper(personally I don’t work the dough, just let it rest on the parchment for a couple of hours and it is wonderfully filled with air pockets when baked and light as a feather) when ready to bake pick up the paper and dough and drop both in the pot, no need to flip, the parchment lines the pot….no clean up

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Dee June 23, 2014 at 7:14 pm

do you put flour or cornmeal on it when you put on parchment or do you just let it be?

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Terry April 21, 2014 at 12:02 pm

I baked this bread this morning. I did something wrong. The bottom is awful hard. I can barely cut it with a steak knife. Any suggestions?

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Kendra April 11, 2014 at 12:56 pm

I have made this recipe 3 times so far. Turns out perfect every time. Even made biscuits. Yum. I have a hard time saving any for anyone else. Simple recipe but so addicting and amazing with a side of olive oil and Italian seasoning. Thanks for sharing!

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Jennifer April 7, 2014 at 7:10 pm

I made this bread. It was really good! My picky 6 year old thought it was the best bread he’d even eaten. I was so proud of myself and it really was very easy!

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Carlota March 24, 2014 at 8:31 pm

Thank you, this recipe is fabulous. My shortcut is that I use the parchment paper rounds (used to line round cake pans) and it keeps me from having to flip it over into the dutch oven. I take about the size of a grapefruit of dough, (the 6-cup batch makes 2) do the folding and tucking under, put a parchment paper round on a cookie sheet, sprinkle it heavily with cornmeal, and put the tucked dough on it. I let it rise in a turned-off oven after heating it to just barely 100 degrees, maybe less. Just so it feels cozy, not hot. It rises in there until ready to bake, I take it out so that I can preheat the oven and cast iron, and when oven temp is ready I take the dough under the parchment paper with a pizza peel. Steadying the front edge of the paper, I can slip it off and lower it into the cast iron without having to turn it over.
Mixing subsequent batches into the old container without washing it will encourage a sourdough. After a while it will be slightly pungent and the recognizable sourdough smell.
This is now my favorite bread recipe. Thanks again.

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kevin March 28, 2014 at 6:12 am

What is the “old container ” that you refer to?

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Brette Pruitt March 21, 2014 at 6:54 pm

I tried a slow-rise pizza dough recipe and it was a disaster. I followed the recipe to the letter and the dough wouldn’t rise. I’ve been making homemade pizza for years, so I threw out the slow-rise dough (no rise, in my case) and started over with my traditional pizza dough recipe. I used the same yeast, so the problem wasn’t the yeast. Using my old recipe, the dough rose beautifully and the pizza was delicious.

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Vanessa April 5, 2014 at 11:07 am

Make sure you’re using quick rise or rapid rise yeast for best results. I make no knead pizza doughs a lot, and I never have a problem since I started using rapid rise yeast.

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Thanh March 20, 2014 at 6:06 pm

I have always been intimidated by baking bread until this recipe. It turned out perfect and delicious! There is so much of it for just two people. If I were to half the recipe, should I use half of the amount of yeast too?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW March 21, 2014 at 5:16 pm

So happy you finally found bread baking success with this recipe! And yes, for a smaller loaf, halve all the ingredients. Bake for 30 minutes covered and 10-15 uncovered.

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Missy May 19, 2014 at 11:01 am

I made this yesterday and I am blown away by how easy it was! Glad someone else asked about halving it, though, because there’s no way hubby and I will ever eat all of that in 3 days. Can’t wait to try the whole wheat variation, too!

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Luiza March 19, 2014 at 3:39 am

I loved this recipe! It’s such an easy and fun way to make delicious bread, once I’ve done it for the first time I got addicted! I have translated your recipe for portuguese and posted on my blog, my friends in Brazil are loving it. Cheers!

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Kate from Frugal Living NW March 19, 2014 at 8:42 am

Yay! Thanks Luiza :)

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Edith Derheim March 18, 2014 at 4:02 pm

WOW!!!! I live with chronic pain and am trying to improve my, and my family’s, health. This was so easy to make! Everyone loves it and asked me to make more. Now I have a rosemary and parmesan loaf ready to cook.

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Melissa March 13, 2014 at 7:03 am

I have been doing this kind of bread for a while now. I add a bit of rosemary, Parmesan and smoked Gouda to mine…..YUMMY! A different twist is adding orange zest and craisins is also very good too…top it off with some orange butter….delish in the morning!!!

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Kris Jackson March 8, 2014 at 4:22 pm

I just purchased some coconut flour at Costco, can I use this flour in this bread recipe?

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Kristin May 14, 2014 at 11:48 am

No. Coconut flour has completely different properties than other flours. Recipes using coconut flour require less flour and far, far more water. Look for a bread recipe specific to coconut flour. They are pretty easy to find online–especially on paleo blogs.

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Becky March 2, 2014 at 8:09 pm

Bravo!!! I just made this bread, and let me tell you…it was beyond perfect. I have had a few failed attempts at making bread so I admit I was intimidated. This recipe was easy and I expect now that I will never buy store bought bread again! Thank you so much for sharing this!

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Nicki March 2, 2014 at 2:20 pm

This looks yummy! Have you heard of anyone having success making this bread with a gluten free all purpose blend? There are too many comments in this thread to view them all! :)

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Save Big Live Better! March 2, 2014 at 10:07 am

I’m always on the hunt for a new bread recipe! Looking forward to trying this one and hopefully saving myself the “bread arms workout” from now on! LOL:)

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Pat March 2, 2014 at 7:05 am

I just made this bread. I love the recipe. I can made the dough after dinner and let it sit until the next nights’ dinner. I often put the pot in the oven and have the oven turn on with the timer shortly before I get home. By the time I get the rest of dinner together it is finished. I just made cinnamon raisin. I added about 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2 tsp cinnamon and some raisins. It stuck to the pan a little bit, but it is awesome! Anyone try a gluten free version of this bread?

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Jo February 21, 2014 at 11:45 pm

Oh my delish it looks!!
I need to start working on a gluten free trial and I’ve recipes here for gluten free bread, but I want to stay away from the potato starch and tapioca starch etc etc.. I want real bread.. I’m thinking this would be great made with oat flour. I don’t suppose anyone has yet tried it? I knew I should have bought some today when I was at the health store!

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Jennifer February 21, 2014 at 6:54 am

I love your bread recipe! How do I go about making flavored bread? Can I simply add raisins and cinnamon (for example) to the current recipe? What about cheese and italian herbs?

Thanks!!

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Tee February 22, 2014 at 9:53 am

I’d say why not give it a shot and just try it out on a loaf, see how it goes.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 22, 2014 at 1:27 pm

Yes, you can add in all kinds of ingredients to this basic bread recipe! Check out our FAQ page for some more ideas: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

My all time favorite add-in ingredients is Trader Joe’s Quattro Formaggio cheese (it’s one of their shredded cheese blends). It makes the most incredible cheese bread! Simply add a handful (1-2 cups) to the dry ingredients before adding the water. Proceed with recipe, as written!

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Vanessa April 5, 2014 at 11:10 am

If you use dried fruits your bread may be drier bc the fruits absorb the water. You might have to play around a little to get water content right.

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PETER August 22, 2014 at 8:14 pm

G’day

love the bread – thanks- have read that bread for second rising can be put into dutch oven and into cold oven – turned on and cooking time from when cooking temperature reached and further lid removed and allowed 15 minutes to brown.

would like your opinion on these ideas

kind regards

peter

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 24, 2014 at 2:45 pm

Hi, Peter! I’ve never tried that but this is a thread from the super helpful site, The Fresh Loaf, that talks specifically about that method: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/26049/cold-dutch-oven-proof-bread-then-bake

Hope that helps!

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Chelsea February 19, 2014 at 10:23 am

Has anyone tried doing this bread in a crock pot? I’ve been reading a bit about doing that, and want to find a good recipe for that so I don’t have to turn my oven on more than necessary in the summer (and hope to have my bread baking down pat before our 3rd LO arrives this spring)!!

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stina February 28, 2014 at 5:49 pm

My husband linked this website to my facebook wall. http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2012/05/29/crock-pot-bread-baking-fast-bread-in-a-slow-cooker
Personally I’m not interested in it, since you still have to put the bread under a broiler to get the crust browned, but hey, if you wanna try, go for it!

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Junebug February 16, 2014 at 6:06 am

I have made this about 4 times in the past two weeks. It is so easy!!! My husband loves the bread toasted with his bacon and eggs. Like you, we just keep it in the pan and slice as needed. Thank you for posting and giving such great instructions.

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HeyCupcake February 13, 2014 at 2:27 pm

I just baked a loaf of cinnamon raisin (adding TJ’s pumpkin pie spice and brown sugar). Wow. So rich, I can’t even take it. I’ve known of this recipe since you originally posted it; back then I bought a huge bag of Better for Bread flour, and two cast iron dutch ovens just to make it. It took getting snowed in and running out of bread to actually whip it up though, haha. We (my husband and son are nuts about it now too) made 3 loaves and a batch of rolls over the last week, and they all turned out so perfectly in their own way! Thank you for concocting this bread formula, it’s just that in a world where nothing is perfect, this REALLY is.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 13, 2014 at 8:27 pm

Thanks, HeyCupcake! We love it, too. My husband braved the snow here last weekend to go to the store just to buy a 10-lb. bag of flour. Ha! We’re hooked.

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Debbie February 12, 2014 at 11:49 am

I just received a Dutch oven as a gift. Could I add sunflower and pumkin seeds or nuts to this receipe to make it healthier?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 13, 2014 at 8:22 pm

Yes! Read the comments or our FAQ post for more add-in ideas: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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elaine February 11, 2014 at 3:01 pm

Can some healthy grains or different flours be added?
Love this bread it is silly easy to make, but would love to boost the nutritional value. thanks

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 11, 2014 at 8:17 pm

Yes! I’ve been adding all kinds of different grains and flours (millet, barley, buckwheat, spelt, oat), with great results. Each loaf turns out a little differently, but I haven’t made a bad one yet.

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Katrina Schmitt February 11, 2014 at 2:07 pm

never mind. I was in the wrong book. SMH! sorry

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Katrina Schmitt February 11, 2014 at 1:57 pm

I purchased the book, and I was curious about other recipes, but couldn’t find this particular recipe. Is there another name they call it?

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Kitty February 7, 2014 at 8:25 pm

I used to make this quite a lot, but got out of the habit.
Yesterday afternoon I decided to mix up a batch and found out I was short of flour. I wanted a largish loaf and spied a box of instant mashed potato flakes in the pantry. I had 4 cups of flour, and added maybe 1 and 1/2 cups of potato flakes, less than half a teaspoon of yeast, a pinch of salt and 2 cups of tepid water.
It seemed a little dry, but I’ve had dryish dough bake up fine and I just let it rise all night and baked it off this afternoon. The Best Loaf I and EVER baked of this, slightly sweet, with a moist light spongy texture and the crust was thin but crisp. Light texture but artesian and really good. I will make this again in a few days, after I restock my flour supply. Super good and the loaf was really lovely in appearance, I almost hated cutting into it. :) but I did.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 9, 2014 at 11:17 am

Great tip, Kitty, thanks! My mom used to make bread dough using the water from cooking potatoes. It made delicious, soft bread. Must be something about the starch?

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Joan February 5, 2014 at 11:14 am

Just took this out of the oven. My oh my…it looks and smells so good! I was afraid that it might not turn out as I used the 6 cups of flour recipe, but only have a 5 quart dutch oven. Turned out great though. Still waiting for the crackling to stop so we can eat it. Thanks so much for such an easy, yet wonderful bread recipe. This is definitely going to be one that I will be making quite often as we love Artisan style bread.

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Kristi February 4, 2014 at 8:01 am

I just finished making the dough and realized I would be baking the bread around 2 AM. Is there a way I can freeze the dough and bake it in the morning?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 4, 2014 at 10:50 am

This dough is really flexible/forgiving. If you need to bake it under the initial 12 hour rise time, you should be fine. If you need to bump it past the 18 hour time, just stick the dough some place cooler in your house until you bake it. I wouldn’t freeze the dough.

Then just make sure it has the 2 hour final rise, and you’ll be good to go!

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Anita February 1, 2014 at 10:26 am

Thank you very much for the recipe! I saw it on Pinterest, and was excited to try it. I used King Aurthur bread flour, but am curious how the Meijer brand or a less expensive brand of bread flour would hold up because I intend to make this at least a couple to a few times a month! I did need to add a bit more water because of the lack of humidity in our house (A very cold January in Michigan this year). My husband and I kept going back for more once it was “mostly” cooled. We had a hard time waiting. He travels to Europe for work and has had his fair share of fresh bakery breads. I would eat this with jam, turkey and cheese sandwiches, anything with egg on top, with soup…it’s just so good. Thanks again!

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Emily from Frugal Living NW February 1, 2014 at 4:10 pm

I’m happy you had such great success with this recipe/method! My husband and I have no self-control around a loaf of fresh-baked bread either… :)

And yes, a generic brand bread flour would work just fine for this recipe. I prefer Bob’s Red Mill unbleached white flour, but I use other brands, like Gold Medal, with good results!

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Heather January 31, 2014 at 12:15 pm

Thanks so much for sharing this recipe! I love being able to have some wiggle room for letting the bread rise. Overnight makes it so convenient. Also, it’s so easy to use in my dutch oven. My one tip would be to purchase the Lodge cast iron model L8DD3 with Skillet Cover. This one has no handle on top so you can use the lid as a skillet. It is amazing for cooking tortillas, btw! And frugal to have “two pots” in one.

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-L8DD3-Casserole-Skillet-5-Quart/dp/B000LEXR0K/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1391199250&sr=8-3&keywords=lodge+dutch+oven+5+quart

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Larry January 29, 2014 at 11:08 am

I haven’t made this bread in two years, but I recall a friend convinced me that placing the cotton cloth on the bread as it is cooling will noticeably improve the bread. But I can’t recall exactly what the improvement was, just that I tried covering the bread and it did seem even better. I think it made the crust less hard by keeping the moisture in. Has anyone tried covering the bread, and what difference did it make?

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Julie June 20, 2014 at 10:49 am

Covering the bread with a cloth traps some moisture and softens the crust. You usually want Artisan bread to have a crunchy crust so I wouldn’t cover it myself.

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Linda January 26, 2014 at 3:16 pm

Can you refrigerate this dough? I came across a recipe in the Oregonian Food Day where they had a no knead recipe for artisian bread that you kept in a bowl in your fridge (for up to 14 days). It made about 4-1 lb loaves (I think!). I tried it once with ok results but I loved that I had the dough done ahead of time and it was so easy to cut off a blob of dough, put it on the counter to “rise” and then bake later.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW January 27, 2014 at 4:33 pm

That recipe sounds like Artisan Bread in 5-Minutes a Day. I featured that recipe in this post: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/making-artisan-yeast-bread-from-scratch/ I have never tried refrigerating this dough, as it uses less yeast and needs a longer rise. If you tried it, it would probably need to happen after that initial long rise. Now I’m curious. I’ll report back if I try it!

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Tracy January 16, 2014 at 11:20 am

I’ve been making Lahey’s No-Knead Bread for many years, but never doubled the recipe until today. Beautiful! It’s crackling as it cools and I can hardly wait to slice it. Thanks for the suggestion!

Re: The dough sticking to the parchment: I use a tip Cook’s Illustrated published when they revamped the recipe in 2008. Spray the parchment with non-stick spray, and put it in a fry pan. After you briefly knead the dough and form it into a ball, place it seam-side down onto the parchment, lightly spray and/or flour the top of the loaf and cover with plastic wrap and a towel. When it’s ready to go into the oven, remove the plastic and towel, slash the loaf and use the parchment as a sling to lift the risen dough into the dutch oven. The parchment goes into the pot under the bread, there is no flipping involved, and stickiness, to the paper or the pot, is not an issue. The parchment comes right off after baking and doesn’t affect browning or shape at all. It’s worked well for me for 6 years, so perhaps it will be useful to someone else.

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Adrienne January 24, 2014 at 3:03 pm

It helped so much!! Thank you!!

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magdalena January 12, 2014 at 2:40 pm

Omg I just made it!!! Fabulous! I have never baked bread in my life with success. It is cooling now and I cant wait to try it. Thanks and greetings from Alaska!

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Kate from Frugal Living NW January 12, 2014 at 8:22 pm

Yay!!! And after you take your first bite you’ll be making it everyday! Great job :)

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sara January 9, 2014 at 8:52 am

Can the no knead bread recipe be halved? My Dutch oven is only a 3 1/2 quart.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW January 9, 2014 at 11:48 am

Yes, it can! That is actually the original recipe. See our FAQ page for more information: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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Kris January 27, 2014 at 2:11 pm

I’ve cut the recipe down to quarter a loaf and used my little all clad sauce pan to cook it. It made a PERFECT breadbowl sized loaf.

It’s just me so I make that little one a few times a week and NOM NOM NOM. Best recipe ever!

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popeye January 7, 2014 at 9:55 am

This turned out awesome! I’ve flopped a couple different recipes, but this turned out perfect – I’ll definitely be doing it again. Thanks! And, the crust was just hard enough and thin.

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kakmom December 30, 2013 at 7:07 pm

I love this! I’m a complete novice when it comes to bread baking but this recipe is perfect. I made two loaves on Christmas Eve and 3 more batches since then. In fact, I have two bowls of dough rising right now.
Thanks so much.

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Nora December 22, 2013 at 12:25 pm

Made this and it came out so good! Love using my Le Creuset in a new way. I will be making it again soon!

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janice December 5, 2013 at 7:50 pm

My bread doesn’t rise much after I told it over on itself a couple times(after the initial 18 hour rise). In fact it just kinda turns into blob abd flattens out. It still turnd out pretty good in the end though. What am I doing wrong? Also, can I add cinnamon, cranberries, raisins, molasses, honey, etc. To make this a holiday bread or will any of that interfere with it rising? I want to make a yummy Christmas version of this.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW December 7, 2013 at 7:07 pm

Sounds like you could add some more flour. The dough will be wet but it should be manageable, not a blob. And yes, you can add additional ingredients. See our FAQ post for more on that:http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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Kitty November 26, 2013 at 8:39 am

I’ve done this many times, this is an awesome way to make bread, chewy and delicious.
I got out of the habit during the Summer and Yay, I’m going to check to see if I have yeast and hopefully get a loaf started.

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Sonia November 19, 2013 at 10:19 am

I’m always looking for new recipes to use in my dutch oven and this recipe looks awesome. Love your adjustments for a bigger loaf with a thinner crust. Just pinned!

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Emilie November 17, 2013 at 5:04 pm

What if I don’t have a dutch oven? Can I use any casserole dish with a lid? Thanks in advance! :)

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Emily from Frugal Living NW November 17, 2013 at 10:11 pm

Hi, Emilie! Check out our FAQ page for an answer to this and more: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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greenjeen November 2, 2013 at 10:39 am

wow! I am so excited! This time I heated up the pot and voila! perfect! No giant unmanageable blob, rose in the expected times, and this time we used all white flour, this is the one that I’ve been craving. So delish, rustic, crispy crust, chewy interior, would love to show you a picture, I have several, hahaha. O.k., thanks a million, made my year! :)

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Debby GS October 21, 2013 at 2:19 pm

I’ve made this recipe a few times. Just finished another white loaf and again turned out perfect. I also did a 9 grain whole wheat with half white flour. It also turned out good but not as good as the all white. It was denser and the dough was a tad more runny than the white. I then tried a dark rye. Well that ws definitely more runny. I used half white flour and the other half was the rye flour. It didn’t rise as much and was much more dense. When I had it on the towel to rise for the remaining two hours it was turning into more of a pancake. After baking it tasted fine but would maybe try 2 cups rye flour and 4 cups white next time. Or maybe it needs 1 tsp. of yeast for the darker floured bread. Any other suggestions!

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greenjeen October 20, 2013 at 9:21 am

I love this bread. I also had the loose bread blob, but after adding about another cup or so of flour it was somewhat manageable. Stuck all over the parchment even tho I put tons of flour on it, anyway I ended up oiling the dutch oven, cold, then took the dough and formed it again into a ball-ish shape, did a third rise, but in the pot, and in about an hour it was risen and I popped it in the oven and it turned out perfect. I’m going to make another loaf today so I’ll know to adjust my water/flour ratio as I go.
Since it turned out fine starting in a cold pot, I don’t think I’ll even try that “scary hot” pot! Well, maybe down the road a bit, I might, ;-D
Thanks again for this delicious simple recipe, it was just what I’d been searching for!

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Roy C October 18, 2013 at 3:43 pm

I have tried many different combinations and they all turn out great. For this recipe, I use 1/2 bread flour and 1/2 Wheat flour.

I also make a version with parmesan chunks, prociutta ham and sun dried tomatoes.

Another version, i use calamatta olives, green olives and jalepenos.

For all these versions, i just mix in the ingredients at the beginning.

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SAMcClellan October 17, 2013 at 9:18 pm

I finally got the red spice pot that’s shown above from Amazon..abt $50. So, I can finally try this out. I’m kinda excited to try out some artisan bread-making. And, PS those Pumpkin Spice Pancakes, might work well for waffles, too…to eat some, freeze some for later? (Just one of me, so I look for things that “keep”) Add a 1T coconut or other & adj from pancake to waffle recipe, for batter. I use Martha White’s bisquit mix (small servings). PS~I can use the pot on my induction burner, too, btw & it works really well!…For soups, etc..not bread ;)

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Ange October 13, 2013 at 8:31 am

This makes a great loaf, but I’m ready to get more creative. Could you please tell me at what stage would you add mix-ins (seeds, cheese, herbs etc.)? Right at the beginning when you mix all the ingredients or at the second 2 hour rise? Also roughly how much would you add, a cup? Thank you!

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Debby GS October 4, 2013 at 4:39 pm

Just made this bread today and it worked out perfectly. It’s a huge loaf and to be honest I was a bit skeptical but so glad I tried it. So easy. It really does look like a loaf from an artisan bakery. I did not have a cast iron Dutch oven but did have a heavy gauge stainless steel soup pot. I did lightly oil the pot but won’t do that next time as the oil burnt to the pot when I preheated it. Anyway it still worked out perfectly. So glad I found this site for the recipe as it’s my new favourite.

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Debby GS October 4, 2013 at 4:44 pm

Whoops! I was supposed to oil the pot after it was preheated! Just realized that! It was still delicious and didn’t stick!

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Lilach September 29, 2013 at 6:57 pm

I’ve made this bread once, and it stuck to the bottom of the pot. I preheated for about 30 minutes prior to transferring the dough. I’m trying it again but was wondering how to make it without having it stick. Any ideas?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW September 29, 2013 at 9:46 pm

If you are nervous about it sticking again, just oil the pot. When you pull the pre-heated pot out of the oven, pour 1 T. of olive oil into the pot and quickly wipe it around with a paper towel. Flip the dough into the pot and proceed as written. That will do the trick!

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Ashley Roberts September 24, 2013 at 7:59 pm

I must have checked follow comment or something. Please please unsubscribe me. I have followed the unsubscribe link multiple times over several weeks and the e-mails keep coming. Please remove me from the thread.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW September 25, 2013 at 12:07 pm

We have no way to remove you from our end. Sorry.

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Lacey Fisher September 23, 2013 at 11:19 am

Wow! I made this bread last night…so delish! And super easy as well. I have never made bread until now and I’m ecstatic at its flavor and simplicity…can’t wait to make this a weekly staple for our family of two!

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CarolAnne September 22, 2013 at 11:20 am

Recently discovered this. Husband loves it. For the tricky flipping part I put a cutting board under the towel/parchment before placing the dough down. When time to flip it to dutch oven it makes it much easier & neater.

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margaret main October 11, 2013 at 1:06 pm

I have made this loads of times and love it, instead of parchment paper or paper towel, I use a linen towel covered in flour, with another one to cover, when ready its so much easier just to pick up the sides of the towel and flip over into that very hot pan, being British this was a joy to discover, just like being back home. have not brought Supermarket bread since finding this thanks very much

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Kristen September 19, 2013 at 11:30 am

I’ve made this a few times now and it is LOVED by anyone who gets to eat it! I tried a few different variations. My favourite so far is
half bread flour, half spelt flour and about 1/4c of ground flax seed. I’m excited to get more creative and try different flavours like adding cheese, nuts, seeds, and berries (up next is jalapeño cheese bread).

Does anyone know if I should change the flour-water ratio when I add extra ingredients? I didn’t for the flax seed and it turned out perfectly, but it might be necessary when adding things like cheese. Thanks!

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Eugenia September 16, 2013 at 4:52 am

OH. M. Gee. This bread is absolutely DELICIOUS!!! I made it this weekend and actually took it to my in-laws ( I was nervous as I didnt know if the inside turned out ok). It was amazing. It was gone in 24hrs. It reminds me of bread i used to eat growing up in Ukraine. And to think I used to pay close to $6 for a smaller loaf at a local bakery here in the States is insane (and only like 3 times a year as a treat!). LOVE THIS recipe! Thank you so much. Will be making it again and again.

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Maria September 14, 2013 at 5:28 am

OMG! I just did this bread and is AMAZING! Thanks for sharing it! I have baked breads before but never this kind of bread. Is sooooo good! Is hard to stop eating it!

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hollie szamosfalvi September 13, 2013 at 1:26 pm

I love the cooling rack you have in one of the pics – where is that from? I’m in the market. thanks!

hollie

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Rose September 13, 2013 at 5:56 am

I made this recipe in my large clay pot (Roemer Topf), and it turned out so delicious! I will experiment with different flour types throughout the next few weeks. Thanks for posting this recipe!

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Heather September 9, 2013 at 2:55 pm

Made the dough yesterday and its baking right now!!!
I cut the recipient in half as I have a 3.5 qt Dutch oven I bought just for this!!!! Can’t wait to try the bread! My house smells amazing!!!
Defiantly going to add to this and experiment with flavors!!!! Mmm a sweet dough for breakfast would be great!!!!!

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Dianne September 7, 2013 at 9:06 pm

I have been making this bread exclusively for more than 2 years. First I did the 100% white, then a half and half Whole Wheat, and finally 100% Whole Wheat. Now I have a Vitamix Blender and grind my own wheat berries, wow with only 5 ingredients, I feel so healthy! That has changed the consistency of the bread dough but it makes up wonderful into a loaf when baked. It is much heavier as 100% Whole Wheat (I add 2 T. Molasses) but it is wonderful. I have mistimed the rising of both the first and second time where I didn’t make it home for much longer than the time specifies and it has done just fine in the baking process. This is a very, very, very forgiving bread that has been a hit for everybody who has tasted it. Making this bread has paid for the Cast Iron Dutch Oven over and over again. Try it you will be hooked for life.

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jess September 4, 2013 at 12:08 pm

Hey There! I am ready to try, I love homemade breads but never have the time!! I skimmed the article but didn’t see how much of everything to put in? I think I saw three cups of flour but that was it!?

Thanks so much

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greenjeen November 10, 2013 at 8:40 am

it is six cups of flour. there was a link to the ingredients and instructions somewhere in the above conversation. good luck!

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Kjerstin September 2, 2013 at 9:26 am

I just made the dough and realized that 18 hours from now will be 3 a.m…. Fail. What might happen if I leave it until the morning (the real morning, ya know with sun and everything). Thanks.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW September 2, 2013 at 9:52 am

Kjerstin — I’ve cut the rise time short and you could bake it tonight at 9 or 10 and be fine. I think if you waited until morning you would be fine too.

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Sarah August 27, 2013 at 7:16 pm

Hey there! I’ve made bread a bunch of times and its frustrating to admit that this hasnt quite turned out as expected. The start seemed to be working well, but after the initial 16 hr rise, the dough was incredible wet. To the point where it was like the dreaded bread blob monster. I’ve added almost 1.5 more cups of flour to get it to a workable consistency, and I’ll try baking it to see what happens. But do you have any tips as far as the initial mixture goes: how does one tell if its a “wet and sticky dough” for the initial rise without it producing something overly wet and sticky?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 28, 2013 at 6:12 pm

No one likes a blob monster. The dough should be wet and sticky but manageable. You should be able to shape it into a rough round loaf for that second rise on the floured parchment paper/towel. So I’d say whether or not you can handle/shape it is a good indication of whether you have added enough flour.

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Vanessa August 27, 2013 at 5:23 pm

Hi – My sister and I were wondering if anyone has tried freezing this bread? If so how did you store it when it thawed? (I love this recipe so good and so easy!!!) Thanks!!!

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Lisa LS August 24, 2013 at 6:25 pm

I am really interested in trying this! There is a bakery in Petaluma, CA that makes a chewy loaf like this but they coat the top with a olive oil, salt, lemon and rosemary rub right as it’s out of the oven. OMG, to be able to make that myself instead of paying $6 a loaf, the kids can go to college now! :) Anyway, I was wondering if it would work to do this on a pizza stone instead of the Dutch oven. Any reason why I couldn’t use the stone, which I have, vs. the Dutch oven which I don’t? Thanks!!

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 24, 2013 at 8:49 pm

Emily might be able to answer this question better but my assumption is that it wouldn’t make a round loaf. The dough moves a lot so if you put it onto a stone after it’s raised it’s going to be more of a flat loaf instead of rounded. Plus, there is something necessary about the lid and the steam that it provides while baking. With a stone, no lid.
That’s my best guess but Emily could add more.

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Michele August 24, 2013 at 6:25 am

What will happen if I only have 8 hours to let the dough rise for the first time, and 2 hours for the second? I have made this recipe before — and it’s wonderful — but I didn’t allow myself enough time, and I’d like to serve it at a dinner party tonight.

Thanks

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 24, 2013 at 9:50 am

I’ve let mine rise only 8 hours and it turned out fine. But now that I say that yours won’t ;) You should be okay.

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Leslie Estes August 23, 2013 at 11:21 pm

To the admin: I am soooo sorry for the six posts! My internet connection kept cutting out and it wasn’t showing up on my side. I retyped/re-posted each time without realizing it was indeed posting. If possible, please remove all but the post that is time stamped August 23, 2013 at 10:06 pm. Thanks so much! Again, I am so sorry for the inconvenience! :-/

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 24, 2013 at 9:50 am

You’re fine :) I was able to delete some of them.

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Leslie Estes August 23, 2013 at 10:06 pm

HI! Just found your site (there was a link to it in an Amazon Dutch Oven review – lol!) Thanks for sharing this great recipe – can’t wait to try it! I hope I didn’t just miss it, but I did not see if it the Dutch Oven should be prepared, just before adding the dough (oiled, or oiled and dusted with flour or corn meal)? Or perhaps adding it to a very hot pot keeps it from sticking? I usually dust my baking stone with non-GMO corn meal.

Thanks!

PS: I’ll certainly be a regular to this site – I love cooking, baking and saving some ‘dough’. ;-)

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Kate from Frugal Living NW August 23, 2013 at 10:38 pm

Leslie we’re glad you found us! I don’t do anything to my dutch oven before I put the bread in and the bread comes out just fine.

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Su September 1, 2013 at 9:32 am

Preheating the dutch oven IS crucial, as I found out to my chagrin when I forgot this step one time while making this bread. I had made it so many times by then I was chatting away to my daughter while I put it into the dutch oven and then into the oven, and completely forgot to preheat the pan WITH the oven! It was extremely difficult to remove from the pan; eventually I got the sides loosened enough that I could get the majority of the loaf out, but the entire bottom crust and about 1/2″ of bread stuck. I finally had to just put water in there and soak it out. Lesson learned—that step is really important!

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Andrea R August 22, 2013 at 10:38 am

I am a vry inexperienced baker but am trying to use healthier alternatives in the kitchen. One recent find is Spelt Flour. Do you have an suggestions for substituting Spelt Flour in this no-knead bread recipe?

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Leslie Estes August 23, 2013 at 9:22 pm

HI! Thanks for sharing this great recipe. Can’t wait to try it! I hope I didn’t just miss it – but I did not see if it says the Dutch Oven should be prepared beforehand (oiled, oiled and floured or dusted with corn meal)? Or perhaps adding it to a very hot pot keeps it from sticking. Although your pics are so truly appreciated, I can not tell if your pot is oiled and floured or maybe just a bit stained?

Thanks!

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chris August 20, 2013 at 12:13 am

Hi I have got this rising now for the second time. I have made bread lots of times before and this was so wet after the first rise that I had to pour it out and think I added the wrong amount of water. I’m in the UK and used a US cup measure. Does your recipe mean two and two thirds cups? That’s what I used. I had to add at least another cup of flour to make it manageable.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 20, 2013 at 3:05 pm

Yes, the recipe calls for 2 2/3 cups of water. However, if you had to pour the dough out, then it was too wet. The dough will look differently based on how you measure the flour and what the temperature and humidity are in your area. Once you have made this bread a few times, you’ll get a good feel for what the dough should look like and can adjust the flour and water, as needed. Just use the measurements as a basic guide and make slight adjustments (I usually do 1-2 tablespoons at a time).

Check out our FAQ page for more! http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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Maureen August 18, 2013 at 9:52 pm

I deal with the awesome stickiness by adding 2tbs of olive oil with the first rise, Works every time and improves flavor.

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suzie blackwell August 18, 2013 at 7:32 am

I feel so capable thanks to your directions!!! I cut the recipe in half, but otherwise followed the directions exactly. What an amazing aroma there is coming out of my oven right now. Waiting to cut into that golden brown crust will be the only hard part.

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Kristina August 15, 2013 at 7:21 pm

Has anyone had luck making this with a little less salt? I’m on a low sodium diet and would like to HALVE the salt in the recipe but don’t know if it will drastically effect the rise…

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 16, 2013 at 6:33 am

No problem! It won’t affect the rise, just the flavor. We have had several comments from people cutting salt, or omitting it altogether. Some add herbs or other add-in for flavor (see FAQ page for some ideas).

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RB56 August 12, 2013 at 7:09 am

made a loaf this weekend. followed the instructions exactly and it turned out perfect. the bread was really good. had a great crust and a nice inside.

ive never baked bread before and this was pretty simple. just some timing to be done and that’s about it.

i thought it could have been cut for sandwiches even had i wanted to. very impressed

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Brittany August 8, 2013 at 6:31 am

Is the t. supposed to be tablespoon or teaspoon?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW August 8, 2013 at 7:53 am

t. = teaspoon, T. = Tablespoon

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Ann August 4, 2013 at 4:09 pm

It has risen almost to the top of bowl and has only been 8 hours. Lots of bubbles, I may try my luck and go to step two. Wish me luck!

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Dixie Cup July 30, 2013 at 2:09 pm

Looks great! would i be able to split the recipe in half and bake it in a smaller, 3.5 quart pot. Would the cooking time or temperature vary if i split it?

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Emily from Frugal Living NW July 31, 2013 at 8:43 am

Splitting the recipe (back down to the original size) works great! Check out our FAQ page for directions: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

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Dixie Cup September 9, 2013 at 9:07 pm

tried both half size and full size and it came out great. thanks for the recipe! Im trying every kind of variation now! (honey, molasses, herbs, etc)

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christine July 23, 2013 at 8:50 pm

Wow, this is amazing! I only had a four qt. dutch oven and it worked great!

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Cindy July 19, 2013 at 11:41 pm

I’ve made a variation of this bread a few times already. It’s a very forgiving loaf! When you think your doing it wrong.. You’re probably doing it right! Just go with it :)

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Renée ♥ July 18, 2013 at 9:16 pm

Thank you for this post!! This looks delicious – I’m trying it as soon as possible… probably in a Dutch oven – been cooking in one for years and am convinced it holds some kind of cooking magic ju-ju. I’m starting a sourdough series next month on my blog, and hoping to come up with an equally easy “Artisan Bread” recipe using sour dough starter.

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Debbie July 14, 2013 at 11:39 am

To add to the previous comment, and a capital “T” is tablespoon.

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chelsey July 14, 2013 at 10:41 am

Hey I’m slightly confused. Is it half a teaspoon or half a tablespoon because it only has a t next to it? Please help trying to make this now

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Morgan July 14, 2013 at 11:27 am

teaspoon :)
Good luck and enjoy!

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Lorena Messenger July 13, 2013 at 7:19 pm

Amazing to think bread is made with only four ingredients. I don’t have the cast iron pot but am going To get one and try this recipe.

Interesting note that 2 days ago our newspaper ran a lengthy story about this type of pot. There is a group that cooks all sorts of foods in them. One man even owns 40 pots that he uses routinely to do demostation cooking on the weekends.

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tracy July 11, 2013 at 2:22 pm

got this in the oven RIGHT now. Im so nervous. Never baked bread in my entire life but this seemed so easy….Kitchen is starting to smell good so hopefully I did something right. We shall see in a bit. Thanks so much for sharing your recipe.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW July 11, 2013 at 10:09 pm

How did it turn out? Hopefully delicious :)

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Lara July 10, 2013 at 10:15 am

have you ever tried making this in a real dutch oven- with briquettes? Do you think it would work?
Thanks

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Ddub July 13, 2013 at 1:27 pm

Lara — every summer we camp for a week in Maine. Last year we made this exact recipe every day. 1/3 coals on the bottom and 2/3 coals on the top. Every loaf was perfect and gobbled up.

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Jacque July 7, 2013 at 1:51 pm

I’ve made this recipe several times and found that if I wash out the bowl that it originally raised in then grease it and dust it with flour or oats, the dough doesn’t stick after the second rising. Much easier to get into the dutch oven and not nearly as messy.

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Debbie July 2, 2013 at 5:34 pm

Okay… I’ve got this resting and ready to bake tomorrow. My only concern is that I don’t have a heavy cast iron dutch oven. I ran out today to see if I could find one at a thrift store, but nothing was available. I finally purchased a new cast “aluminum” pot with a lid which juuust about fit the money I had in my pocket. I plan on seasoning this pot before using it tomorrow, but I’m wondering if this will “hurt” the bread.

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Jann Swanson July 2, 2013 at 7:33 pm

Debbie – I have always heard that aluminum conducts heat quite differently than cast iron but have never cooked with it. I would not use the pan and thus be unable to return it until you hear definitively that it will work. I have used cast iron for this recipe but typically use a covered Pyrex casserole (I usually only make half the recipe and my dutch oven is quite large) and reduce the heat a bit (to 380 or 390). The two methods have been equally successful.

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Brenda September 8, 2013 at 6:57 pm

Debbie I have a nice deep cast iron frying pan I have been useing it for yrs for baking breads and scones and cakes works like a champ less expensive than the dutch oven~ just shareing hope it helps
Brenda

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Lisa Hull July 1, 2013 at 5:07 pm

Hi I just made this and it sure didn’t turn out right. I triple checked that I used the proper ingredients/amounts and I did. It rose nicely but was extremely sticky…I kept adding flour until I could get it not to stick to the parchment. When it came time to put into my dutch oven it would not come off the parchment paper. Anyone have any ideas? I live in the high Desert in California, if that matters. I’m not a novice at baking bread.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW July 2, 2013 at 7:16 am

Hi, Lisa! My dough is always slightly different, depending on humidity, temperature, flour, etc. Once you make this bread several times, you’ll start to get a feel for what it should look/feel like. The recipe is a great starting place, but I always need to add more flour or water, depending on the day. That said, my dough often sticks to the parchment, too. I just quickly scrape it off. Sometimes it looks a little funky but should still produce a delicious loaf of bread. To avoid that, try adding more flour or wheat germ. I hope you’ll try it again!

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Judith July 13, 2013 at 1:48 pm

Lisa – I had the same problem, but now spray the parchment with a non-stick spray and then a light dusting of flour – it doesn’t stick at all

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Nic Pond June 20, 2013 at 6:59 pm

I made this a few weeks ago in my 4.5qt Lodge and the hubby said I could make it ANY Time! it was so delicious! I’m anxious to try the whole wheat molasses version tho, YUM!

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Rosie June 18, 2013 at 6:46 pm

All I can say is…..this is FANTASTIC! A HUGE hit!!! I just ordered the cookbook!!!

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FichenDich June 18, 2013 at 5:14 pm

I began doing this about two years ago when the NY Times was all atwitter about the latest thing. It’s rilly super triffic fantabulous BUT…

Maybe you are supposed to just know this, I have never seen it referenced anywhere, the 12 – 20 hours spent rising MUST take place in a climate controlled area. In the Winter my home averages about 52°F. That is not warm enough for the yeast to do its work ! The bread is edible, but it’s very much like unleavened bread !

In the PNW that can be quite problematic.

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Marian Gall June 16, 2013 at 10:34 am

I used to make a lot of bread until our family all got too fat. This does sound like a winner.
I have something I have been wondering about for a long time. Why do so many recipes say “cover with a clean cloth”? I don’t imagine many cooks or bakers would cover with a dirty cloth.

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Maggie June 15, 2013 at 7:35 pm

Made a loaf tonight for a birthday dinner. Incredible! And super easy to make. Thanks!

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Miz Helen June 10, 2013 at 12:38 pm

Congratulations!
Your recipe is featured on Full Plate Thursday this week. Have a great week and enjoy your new Red Plate!
Miz Helen

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irene June 10, 2013 at 11:54 am

I’m having a little trouble. When I make a fairly damp dough (not even “wet”) and put it on the board for the second rising, it spreads out so flat, I do not have any lidded contained I can bake it in. I don’t want a flat bread, i want a nice tall one like you have. When I let it do the second rising in a bowl so it stays high, I have trouble “turning it out” into the dutch oven–it sticks and has to be scraped, so it falls in on itself. Can you help?

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Kate from Frugal Living NW June 10, 2013 at 4:27 pm

I use parchment paper dusted with flour. That seems to do the trick.

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Bella June 24, 2013 at 2:39 am

when I used parchment paper, even floured, it stuck like crazy and I ended up having to pick pieces out of it, causing a deformed albeit delicious loaf. I’ve been using a good quality all cotton dish towel heavily flowered. It works really well.

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Zoe Vayanos June 6, 2013 at 8:23 pm

Just made my first loaf of bread using this method and it was a great success!!! Thank you for the fantastic instructions. The difficulty was being patient while I waited for it to prove, bake and then cool. Couldn’t wait for it to cool completely before slicing it open and smothering it in butter and jam mmmm!!!
I don’t buy bread from the supermarket but my favorite artisan bread maker “Iggy’s bread” costs $7 a small loaf here in Sydney, Australia :(
Will be making my own for a fraction of the cost from now on :))

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Maria Hart June 5, 2013 at 7:05 pm

My dough is resting for the 12-18 hours right as I type. :)
I look forward to baking this tomorrow! I know it will be perfect.
Thank you so much for posting this.

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Carrie @ My Favorite Finds June 5, 2013 at 8:28 am

Wow! I LOVE homemade bread. This looks wonderful. Thanks for sharing at Pinworthy Projects.

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Valerie June 3, 2013 at 10:12 am

I have been making this bread for a few months now and we absolutely love it. Recently the dough does not rise at all like it should in the 12-18 hours and again no rise during the 2 hours. I live in FL my air is always on and set at the same temp but it is not hotter and more humid outside. Any ideas/suggestions, I would greatly appreciate it, we are going a little nuts with no bread. I don’t even buy store bread. Hahaha

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Bella June 24, 2013 at 2:35 am

Might your yeast have expired or been killed?

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Karly June 2, 2013 at 7:58 pm

What a gorgeous loaf of bread! Thanks for linking up with What’s Cookin’ Wednesday!

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Harold June 2, 2013 at 8:26 am

Am not getting the bubbles on the bread after the 12-18 hours. I’ve made this bread a lot, and used to get them all the time, but now!! “Nothing”. Using same measurements as before.. Can it be temp

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Miz Helen May 31, 2013 at 2:46 pm

Bread is my weakness, this looks awesome! Thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday and have a fabulous weekend.
Come Back Soon!
Miz Helen

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Bella May 25, 2013 at 6:56 pm

Hi.
First off: thank you so much for sharing this recipe and making such a detailed tutorial!
I’ve made this bread several times. My friends are crazy about it!
Our question is: do you have any experience making half loaves? I’d like to try it out, but am not sure how I’d adjust the baking time.
We’d love to make rolls. Everyone thinks this would be the perfect bread for soup rolls. Do you have any idea how we could do this?
Thank you so much for considering my questions!

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Todd May 31, 2013 at 6:56 pm

Bella,

This recipe has been doubled. The original recipe can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html

Todd

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Bella June 24, 2013 at 2:31 am

Thank you for that! I will have to test it out in the smaller recipe.

Do you have any experience making them as rolls? Cause that’s what we are really all interested in over here. Hehe.

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Candy May 23, 2013 at 4:28 pm

I have made this bread and variations at least a doz times now. When I taught my mom this recipe, she said, “wow, there is nothing in it.” So now our family has dubbed it the “nothing bread.” It really is the easiest recipe and tastes like a loaf you get at a fancy restaurant.

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Laura May 22, 2013 at 4:04 am

Hi!!
I baked the bread yesterday evening, and it was soooo gooood!!! Thank you for the recipe, I will surely use it again and again!!

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Kat May 21, 2013 at 5:23 pm

Instead of a dutch oven, could you simply use a bread pan for a more uniform loaf shape? I’m curious about trying this recipe but would like to use a loaf pan instead of dutch oven.

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Todd May 31, 2013 at 6:53 pm

No, a regular bread pan won’t work. You need a heavy pan with a good lid. Part of what makes the recipe work is that it’s a very wet dough. So, when you put it in the heavy lidded pot, you end up having steam form inside the pot. A regular loaf pan won’t allow the steam to develop.

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Cheryl May 20, 2013 at 6:34 am

If I cut this recipe in half about how long would I bake it for?

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peter May 19, 2013 at 9:50 pm

would love to cook in camp oven using briquettes.

believe 5 briquettes under and 14 on top would be enough and pushing the briquettes to the center of the top for the last 15 mins should brown the top.

value your opinion

regards

peter

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andrea May 13, 2013 at 9:56 am

i made this bread twice. the first time was a little plain and dense. the second time, i let the dough rise for longer and the taste was better but still dense. i used regular AP flour both times. i bought bread flour to try next time. could this be why? i prefer a lighter bread (with the crunchy outside) like a ciabatta

please help!
I <3 bread!

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andrea May 13, 2013 at 9:54 am

i made this bread twice. the first time was a little plain and dense. the second time, i let the dough rise for longer and the taste was better but still dense. i used regular AP flour both times. i bought bread flour to try next time. could this be why? i prefer a lighter bread (with the crunchy outside) like a ciabatta

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Dave May 7, 2013 at 3:15 am

I’ve been making this bread for years to take to our contra dance potlucks, and experimented with it to make it much simpler. The ingredients I use include two cups of AP flour and one cup whole wheat flour–with a heaping teaspoon of garlic salt for extra flavor. (The original NY Times recipe was only 3 cups of flour and about 1.5 cups water.) My pot is about a two or three quart oval cast iron with lid that I found at a thrift store for 25 CENTS! (I also discovered that a two quart cast iron sauce pan with lid works great for a round loaf.)

As to the second rising step–fergedaboudit. I mix the dough on Friday night (hint: cover the bowl with a motel shower cap), then just before I head for the shower on Saturday afternoon, I pre-heat the oven to 450 (with lid in the oven but off the pan), then I use a flour sifter to sprinkle a ring of flour around the inside of the bowl full of moist sticky dough. Then I use a rubber spatula to scrape the dough away from the edge of the bowl–which causes the flour to coat the dough. Turning the bowl, I work the spatula around the entire ball of dough and around the bottom so that I have a ball of very soft dough lightly coated with flour. I then open the oven, slide out the rack with the very hot pot on it–and then I continue working the dough with the spatula (so it’s not sticking to the bowl) as I dump it into the center of the pot. (NOTE: my hands never touch the dough!) Then on goes the lid, close the oven, set the timer for 25 minutes, and I hit the shower. After 25 minutes, I remove the lid and let it brown for another five minutes or so, then I dump the hot loaf onto a cooling rack for a few minutes while I finish getting ready. I then slide it into a brown paper lunch bag and off I go to the potluck. When I arrive it’s still warm–and warmly received–by my dance friends who have come to depend on my fresh bread at every potluck.

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Jann Swanson May 5, 2013 at 4:11 am

To the several comments that the bread did not increase in size during the first rising; this might be a failure of anticipation rather than the yeast. I have made this over a half dozen times and it has never increased in size by more than 20 percent – unlike the 5-Minute Artisan Bread which sometimes triples (then falls). It does get darker, bubbly, and smells very yeasty. Still, it has always been fantastic.

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Kristin May 1, 2013 at 5:34 pm

I love this bread and have been making it for a while- I would love to know if there is a way to make it more into sandwich bread shape- if I break in up into several batches and just cook it in a loaf pan or something maybe sitting in a pot with a lid- any advice?

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Lindsey May 1, 2013 at 12:38 pm

I made this and I’m so impressed with myself! Thanks for an easy, delicious recipe for such an impressive looking loaf of bread!

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Daniel R. April 30, 2013 at 7:07 pm

Ok First things first. Thank you for this post, it was enough to intrigue me and simple enough that I found no excuse not to proceed. Since then however I have moved on to the Tartine old country loaf recipe. ITS AMAZING! The concept is the same, and unless you decide to make your own starter (WHICH I DID AND RECOMEND link for that at the bottom) it is just as easy. Do give it a googles! Thank you again for this post! It has opened a door that my stomach and family are glad for.

http://tartine-bread.blogspot.com/2013/02/9-days.html

=] D.R.

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rainyday April 28, 2013 at 7:23 am

This recipe is awesome, it works out really well!

One thing I have issues with is that when I make the dough and then cover it with plastic wrap, the next morning it has risen and pressing against the plastic wrap which has been cinched down. This is a problem because the dough is sticky and now is stuck to the plastic wrap. Every time I end up slowly peeling off the plastic wrap and taking a layer of dough with it.

Is there a solution to this? I guess I could get a lager bowl…

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Edith April 27, 2013 at 4:16 am

Hey, I tried my hand at this for the first time. No luck. I used yeast that had been opened a week and white wheat flour. Did I go wrong w thee yeast. The dough has not risen. I also misread the water and b didn’t use enough. Thanks not an avid baker.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW April 27, 2013 at 8:45 pm

Edith – You could still try baking it and see what happens. I would try it again with fresh yeast and the correct amount of water. Don’t give up! This bread is totally possible for new bakers.

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Ali_R May 5, 2013 at 1:03 am

Once you’ve opened your yeast are you storing it closed tight in the fridge?

I have failed miserably at yeast breads my entire life, and that’s a BIG deal because I’ve baked quick breads, cakes, cheese cakes (NY style that never cracked), hand made pastas … PROFESSIONALLY for stores, hotels, restaurants and private clients yet I could NEVER do yeast bread.

What temp is your house? I live in Alaska so I keep my dough on top of the dvr player in the entertainment cabinet. Sometimes for the second rise I turn the oven onto warm (175*) when I do the kneading then turn it off when I put the dough in. But our house is REALLY cold and I’ve been seeing y’all in the PNW are having beautiful weather. It snowed all day here and our girls had to do softball practice in snow boots… sigh!

This one I can do, and you can too!

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Emily from Frugal Living NW May 5, 2013 at 3:32 pm

Yes, I store my opened yeast in the fridge or freezer.

We have had beautiful weather lately! My husband is from Alaska so we keep track of the crazy weather up there with his family. Normally, my house is around 67-degrees. I just change the rise time based on the temp of my house (warmer = shorter, colder = longer). I try to go mainly on the look/smell of the dough.

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samia faiza April 22, 2013 at 10:12 am

That sounds quite easy to make but can we make it on stove??? And at which flame level??

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Anna April 19, 2013 at 1:14 pm

I made this bread again yesterday, but the crust is as hard as a rock. Could this be because I handled it to much? What else could cause this? I cooked it the same as I did the others. Thanks, Anna

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Stephanie April 18, 2013 at 3:39 pm

Hi Marie First, I do freeze a loaf and Emily has some good advice for this in her FAQ section. I use a cup of a mix of seeds and ground flaxseeds and at first replaced a cup of flour with this mix. Now I don’t bother and throw it in with all the flour – just keep the consistency moist. Honestly, I’ve never had a dud loaf and now have lost count of the number of loaves we’ve made and enjoyed. My advice is, just put in what you fancy and see how you enjoy it. :)

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Marifran Connolly April 16, 2013 at 11:10 pm

Is it possible to make bread without salt or with very little salt. I have to be on a low sodium diet, and store bought bread has a lot of sodium in it.

Thanks,

Marifran

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Stephanie April 16, 2013 at 11:38 pm

Hi Marifran – I forgot the salt in the last loaf I baked and we were pleasantly surprised. Absolutely no effect on the quality of the loaf, and I used part white, part wholemeal flours with chia and sunflower seeds and ground flaxseeds. So go for it – put as little salt in as you’d like. Taste was good, because the main reason I forgot the salt is I rarely use it in cooking.

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Marie April 18, 2013 at 1:33 pm

I love the idea of using ground flaxseeds and sunflower seeds! How much of each did you add? Do you need to decrease your flour any?

Also, this is an unrelated question, but I wonder if you could freeze this bread. Has anyone tried?

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AbiMakes April 16, 2013 at 6:10 am
Jessica April 14, 2013 at 5:06 am

I was wondering if you can refrigerate the dough after the first rise? If so, for how long? I was hoping to be able to make a loaf every few days? Would this work? Thanks!

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marla Burton April 11, 2013 at 2:32 pm

Just checking…1/2 tsp. yeast and 2 1/2 tsp. salt? Thx.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW April 11, 2013 at 2:45 pm

Correct! t. = teaspoon

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Jann Swanson April 11, 2013 at 7:12 am

Anna – I flour a piece of parchment paper large enough to encase the bread, fold it over the top for the second rising then cover the paper with a cloth. When my casserole is heated I cut the paper around the bread leaving a 1-2 inch margin all the way around and long tabs on either end. I lower the bread, paper and all, into my dish and later from the dish to a cooling rack using the tabs. It never sticks to anything.

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Anna April 10, 2013 at 10:49 pm

I made this bread a few days ago, I was a bit intimidated when I first began, but just kept following the recipe and it turned out great. I have another batch rising now, and am going to add roasted garlic and rosemary to this loaf. I do have a question, on step #3, can I use something else to keep the dough from sticking to the cloth, like millet? I have millet and don’t have any of the other things mentioned. On the first loaf I used un-toasted wheat germ, but it burned on the bottom of the bread, fortunately I didn’t use much, so the bread was still delicious. I’m hooked on baking bread this way, now! Thanks.

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Anna April 10, 2013 at 10:47 pm

I have made this bread once, I was a bit intimidated when I first began, but just kept following the recipe and it turned out great. I have another batch rising now, and am going to add roasted garlic and rosemary to this loaf. I do have a question, on step #3, can I use something else to keep the dough from sticking to the cloth, like millet? I have millet and don’t have any of the other things mentioned. On the first loaf I used un-toasted wheat germ, but it burned on the bottom of the bread, fortunately I didn’t use much, so the bread was still delicious. I’m hooked on baking bread this way, now! Thanks.

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Susan C April 9, 2013 at 10:06 pm

These are the hardest posts for me to see and smell, seeing as I have Celiac… I would love to find something like this in GF. Enjoy my friends!!!

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Emily from Frugal Living NW April 9, 2013 at 10:16 pm

I have asked our readers and Googled around several times. So far, no one has had rave reviews on a gluten-free loaf of artisan-style bread.

However, if you are just looking for a good recipe for homemade GF bread… A friend of mine who is gluten-free, dairy-free bakes this bread regularly. After trying many recipes, this is her favorite. She brought it over to my house the other day, and it was beautiful. She hasn’t had great success with the loaves of bread so she usually shapes it into rolls. http://gfrealfood.com/2009/06/10/kims-gluten-free-dairy-free-whole-grain-bread/

We would love to hear back from you if you try it out!

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Elizabeth April 9, 2013 at 6:16 pm

This is my first attempt at bread making….I do not usually post…but hey this worked and it was delicious…thank you thank you!!!!

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Maria April 8, 2013 at 8:20 pm

I’ll definitely be trying this! It look so delicious!
One question, if I don’t have a dutch oven, can I use the container that comes with a slow cooker?

Thanks!

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Sue April 9, 2013 at 3:51 pm

Another technique from an Artisan Bread maker is to stretch and the dough four turns. This is done over 15 min intervals for 1 hour. It is done to incorporate more air into the dough. More salt is added and also a 1/2 tsp of wine vinegar for flavor!

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Helen April 7, 2013 at 12:38 am

I’ve had this recipe pinned on my “food!” board (on Pinterest) for ages and finally got round to making it this weekend.
It’s amazing! I still can’t quite believe how simple it was to do – and it works! Thank you!

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Tracy April 5, 2013 at 7:32 am

First of all I’d like to thank you so much. I made my first two loaves of bread last night and they were amazing. I made one in my new cast iron Dutch oven and the other in a clay cooker that I bought at a yard sale and have only used once. I’m sure they will both be getting a lot of use now.

I have one question though… Last night the bread crust was crisp and crunchy. I stored them in the Dutch oven and clay cooker COVERED and this morning the crust is a bit softer. Not terrible, but not crunchy. Should I store them opened??

THANK YOU SO MUCH. I have a new obsession. I have some dough rising as we speak!

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Chelsea April 4, 2013 at 6:57 pm

Yes, Antonia! Do it! I add mine when I take it out to divide into balls to rise under a towel. Just pull it open over and over and add in whatever before you fold it under in a ball. It always comes out delicious and I haven’t noticed any negatives to its texture.

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Chelsea April 4, 2013 at 6:48 pm

I make this almost daily. Whenever I visit family, they need me to bring them loaves of it. They call it “Chelsea bread”, and they think it’s worth traveling for. I can’t get any of them to realize it is incredibly simple and easy to make with no effort or fuss, even though I’ve shown them, written it down, and explained it verbally. It just seems too delicious for them to compute that they can make it, too! I divide the batch into two loaves , each with their own flavorings, and cook them in the inner pot from my little slow cooker, with my cookie sheet as a lid. I have done so many different flavorings, my favorite being fresh cracked black pepper, but I’ve also done herb and garlic, minced onion, honey, and even a spicy crushed red pepper wheat loaf to go with a mild full of veggies cream-and-broth based mushroom soup. This bread has become a staple in my life. I share it with everyone!

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Antonia April 2, 2013 at 10:01 am

I have made this bread at least 100 times. I have given it for a hostess gifts and I love it. I am obsessed!! It is sooooooo easy and DELICIOUS!!! I will never buy a loaf of bread again. I also use Spelt flour and it is good!! Would like to add nuts or something like flax seed in my dough, but don’t know if it will be as good….Anyone out there added stuff to their dough????

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Ashley May 5, 2013 at 12:37 pm

I added 1/2 a teaspoon of raw sugar
and 2 tablespoons of fresh rosemary.
Mine is currently in the oven and it is looking really good!
I can’t wait!

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Daniel R. March 28, 2013 at 4:44 pm

Help… My dough doesn’t seem to be rising during the 1-2 hours before baking. It certainly hasn’t doubled in size… Should it be wrapped to contain moisture or warmth I just laid the cloth on top.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW March 28, 2013 at 7:35 pm

Hi, Daniel! Doubled might be generous, but it should definitely increase in size.

Yes to wrapping. If you follow the directions as written, it should work! You could let it rise for longer if your house is cool. Sometimes I let my dough go for 3 hours on the second rise. I would definitely bake your loaf anyway. It will rise more in the oven.

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Daniel R. March 30, 2013 at 12:58 pm

Thanks Emily.
Had lots of things going on. First my yeast was past its best by date, second my house is at about 70 degrees, and third my dutchoven seems to be too small. I’ve made three loafs since All much better… Still lacking in taste but I have a starter going that should help.

Thanks for the post and the help!

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DD April 1, 2013 at 12:56 pm

Daniel, if you want something a bit more flavorful, I’ve done variations. After the first rise, I added sauted garlic and brocolli to the dough. Just kneaded it in a bit at a time. It was amazing. Also my friend has done a sweet version with dried cranberries and nuts. This recipe is so amazing and versatile!

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kathy May 5, 2013 at 2:02 pm

Make sure your yeast is fresh and not outdated. Old yeast doesn’t rise well. Good luck!

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Becky White March 28, 2013 at 6:32 am

I have made this bread for years and it is soooooooo easy!!! It’s delicious!! I have family members asking to make them some lol I don’t have a dutch oven at all so I break it up into 3 balls and put on a huge cookie sheet and let raise, etc. Works just as good…The author is right… It doesn’t matter what it looks like because it’s so good that just adds to its uniqueness.

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Madeline March 27, 2013 at 5:03 pm

You don’t have to grease the Dutch Oven (mine is cast iron….couldn’t live without it!)? Also, instead of plastic wrap couldn’t you just put the pot lid on it? Thanks.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW March 27, 2013 at 8:24 pm

No, you don’t have to grease your Dutch oven. Check out our FAQ page for more on that.

You could wrap your loaf in plastic wrap which makes the crust softer or just keep it in the lidded pot which will dry it out faster. I usually store leftover bread in my Dutch oven now and just use it for toast by day 3.

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Kari April 21, 2013 at 6:42 pm

Madeline, I have the same question as you. Do we have to use plastic wrap? If the function is to serve as a simple air barrier, would any basic covering (like a lid or plate over the top of a bowl) work for the rise period? Thanks all.

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Daniel R. March 26, 2013 at 9:50 pm

Success! I’m sitting here drooling while I hear it cool… pic at http://instagram.com/p/XWPpcRyC-a/

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Daniel R. March 27, 2013 at 7:10 am

NOT SUCCES. It looked great and sounded great but had only the faintest amount of flavor and was very very compact… any idea why? I did use bleached all purpose flour, could that have been it? Also this may have done something but I concotioned a little spoon out of aluminum foil to hold some water and perhaps create extra steam?
Any sort of help or advice would be appreciated thank you.

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Kate from Frugal Living NW April 29, 2013 at 1:04 pm

It could have been the extra steam. It isn’t really needed with this bread. I would try again with unbleached all purpose and nix the steam.

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shira April 30, 2013 at 5:11 pm

I found it’s really important to use the instant yeast and NOT the active dry. In those small quantities at least. If you do use active dry use A LOT more. I quadruple it usually.

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Emily from Frugal Living NW May 1, 2013 at 2:29 pm

Shira – Either instant or active dry yeast works for this recipe. Lahey’s book lists either option. I always use active dry, since it is so inexpensive at Costco. Even though it is a small amount, it gets the advantage of a long rise time!

GreyWolf March 26, 2013 at 5:05 pm

OK, so I screwed up big-time on my first loaf. I misread the measuring cup and added way too much water. When I “poured” the dough out onto the floured cloth, I had more than a little liquid flow from the bottom of the bowl. I did as well as I could, dusting liberally with more flour and folding it in, and repeating the process until I finally had a manageable dough. From there, I followed the instructions and still created the most fantastic loaf of bread I’ve ever made. Tonight, I begin my second attempt, this time with the right measurements. Great stuff!

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Daniel R. March 25, 2013 at 7:32 pm

I am so freaking excited about this… I will be thinking about this for the next 18 hours. The wait will be worth it though I’m sure, and it’ll be a nice way to end midterms… Thanks.

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Kimberly March 25, 2013 at 9:53 am

I tried this recipe last week and it was a little bit of trial and error. It tasted a little salty but I think that was operator error. I started a new batch yesterday and it was PERFECT!!! Rose just the way it should and even the DOUGH smells delish! I’m so impressed already at how easy it is to have delicious, homemade bread in my house EVERY DAY! We also make home crafted beers, do hydroponic gardening and make our own cheese so in no time at all we will be totally self sufficient! Thank you for this fabulous addition to my recipe book!

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LynnK March 22, 2013 at 2:17 pm

Has anyone ever tried making this with rice flour? My neighbor’s daughter is allergic to gluten and almost never gets bread as it’s a pain to make. I’d like to know if it’s possible before I go spending the money as rice flour can be pretty expensive. Thanks in advacne!

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Alexandra Kulseth March 21, 2013 at 12:02 pm

I’m not sure if I have ciliac disease or not but I do feel better if I stay away from wheat. Is ther a gluten free/wheat free bread recipe out there that actueally tastes decent?

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JudyS March 17, 2013 at 8:56 am

This recipe is incredible – LOVE it! I’ve made it about 4 or 5 times now and it’s always come out great. My family gets together fairly regularly for dinner and they really look forward to this bread being part of the meal. One gathering got cancelled after the bread was already started. When it was done (and after I cut off a small hunk for my husband and I), I wrapped it in foil and froze it (I didn’t have a ziploc bag large enough). It was still good a couple of weeks later when I took it for the next family meal. This recipe is definitely worth the price of my new dutch oven!

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Mary S March 17, 2013 at 5:58 am

I love, love, love, this recipe! Have made it several times, given it out to friends who helped clean out our driveway due to snowstorms, and they loved it too!
Took it to our ‘cowboy church’ (Open Range Fellowship, held at the Ransomed Heart Ranch in Lone Jack, Mo.) last night for our weekly pot luck. It was a success, left several copies of the recipe, and have been asked to put the recipe in our upcoming Open Range Cookbook!

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Danuta March 17, 2013 at 3:26 am

@ Tony, it works well in almost every pan if you can cover it and can take the heat. But look and think, can you handle it easy when it is hot, take away the cover safely etc. An old Dutch oven from a yard sale will do as great as a verry nice shiny expensive new one :) I use a verry low budget real dutch oven so I can use it in my oven, on my woodstove in winter and in the summer outside with coals under and on top of it, cost me about 30 $ new.

@ Heather. Most realy whole wheat breads are verry dense because of the weight of the particels and the moisture they capture. If you want to have some more fibers in your bread, just do the 50//50 whole wheat and bread flower, add some wheat bran and or seeds (quinoa, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower etc) to it. Also do some of the bran and the seeds into the mixture of flour etc you use to cover the breaddough. It realy tastes verry good and gives it a beautifull appearance.

Kind regards

Danuta (Austria)

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Toni March 13, 2013 at 5:40 pm

My sister recommended this recipe to me. She loves it! I don’t have a dutch oven though. I do have regular Pyrex Casserole dishes as well as metal bread load pans. I see some people have used the Pyrex, but then it would be in a square. Any idea if it would work in the metal pan if it was covered?

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Amy March 12, 2013 at 2:48 pm

Trying this right now….Bread is in the oven, I’m just worried that my 5 qt dutch oven (didn’t realize the size until it was too late) is too small for the recipe….fingers crossed.

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Jann Swanson March 12, 2013 at 11:13 am

Patricia – I live alone so the full recipe is a bit much and I also find the dutch oven hard to handle when hot so I always halve the recipe and cook it in a covered Pyrex casserole. I cut everything in half and proceed per directions although I do use an instant read meat thermometer to make sure it is done as it seems to brown a little more quickly than the one time I made it in a dutch oven and want to make sure it is truly done. At 200 degrees internal it is always perfect.

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Michelle March 12, 2013 at 4:55 am

This is a great recipe and one that actually worked for me! I tried this recipe a few days ago with white spelt flour and I thought I would need more than 6 cups of flour but I didn’t. I was worried it would be too loose but when I put it on the counter to raise 2 more hours but it felt good and was raised well (didn’t look it in the pan much). When I took the lid off after 40 minutes I couldn’t believe how good it looked! When I took it out afterwards it looked exactly like the picture above! I have been trying to find a good recipe for bread for a long time so I was pretty excited even calling my husband in to come look and he liked the taste of it as well. Will try it with wheat next time maybe…need a good wheat recipe.

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Patricia March 11, 2013 at 8:44 pm

I tasted this bread at a friend’s house and it was so yummy! My dutch oven is 3.5 qts (i think), so I’m thinking I’d better half the recipe. Have you already tried halving it? I’m wondering if I simply divide everything in half, or if there are any tips or tricks I should be aware of! Thanks!

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Stephanie March 12, 2013 at 5:56 am

I have a 5 qt, and instead of halving it, I make two loaves. I do everything just like the recipie says to, until the 2nd rise time. The 2nd time I split the dough in 2, and let it rise. One will continue to sit while the first one cooks, but I’ve never noticed a difference in the texture between the loaves. Hope this helps!

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ReNae March 8, 2013 at 2:38 pm

Wow. I found you on Pinterest and I started the bread last night and baked it today. I used 100% whole wheat (freshly ground in my mill), 1/3 C gluten and 3 T molasses as you suggested. My one problem was I didn’t dust my towel enough and the bread stuck and I thought I would have a flat, hard, rock of a loaf after baking, but it turned out great. I even took the dough that had stuck to my cloth and threw it on top and it still puffed up and baked wonderfully. I didn’t have a round pot, but an oval caste iron and it baked like a charm. Thank you for this unique and tasty recipe. This is our new favorite bread for when we have soups, grilled cheese, etc. My daughters are already saying they may enter it in the fair.

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ReNae March 8, 2013 at 2:38 pm

Wow. I found you on Pinterest and I started the bread last night and baked it today. I used 100% whole wheat (freshly ground in my mill), 1/3 C gluten and 3 T molasses as you suggested. My one problem was I didn’t dust my towel enough and the bread stuck and I thought I would have a flat, hard, rock of a loaf after baking, but it turned out great. I even even took the dough that had stuck to my cloth and threw it on top and it still puffed up and baked wonderfully. I didn’t have a round pot, but an oval caste iron and it baked like a charm. Thank you for this unique and tasty recipe. This is our new favorite bread for when we have soups, grilled cheese, etc. My daughters are already saying they may enter it in the fair.

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Maria March 8, 2013 at 2:12 am

Well, it is in the oven, but I had the same problem as some other fellow bakers…. it was too wet and running away.
I used 3 cups of rye whole grain and 3 cups of wheat whole grain flower. It seems that I should use more flower next time?
Also, the instructions ask for 3 cups of whole grain flower. Does that mean I should use 3 cups of white flower and 3 cups of wheat flower?
Might post an update later, as it just rang to remove the lit.

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Melissa March 6, 2013 at 1:57 pm

This is a great recipe, and so simple! I made it even simpler by omitting a step. I use King Arthur Flour organic unbleached bread flour. I also bake it in the Lodge cast iron 5 quart Dutch oven. I often make two loaves at a time. I mix the ingredients in my Kitchenaid until it forms a ball around the dough hook. I store it in a Pyrexr four quart glass bowl with lid for two days. I then plop it out on a floured surface and flip it once and quickly tuck the ends under. I don’t spend much time on it, I only want to give it a coating of flour so it is not sticky and I place it in my dutch oven. At that point I put it right in the oven and let it sit in there for 2 hrs. to rise at 150 degrees.When the timer goes off, I bump up the temp to 425 degrees for the 40 minute cook time, and take the lid off and cook another 10-15 minutes

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Sandra March 5, 2013 at 5:18 pm

I would love to know if there is a gluten-free version too!

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Emily March 6, 2013 at 2:18 pm

Here’s an option, that I haven’t personally tried. http://glutenfreegirl.com/i-am-stubborn-i-dont-give-up/

Anyone else?

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Krisellen March 5, 2013 at 12:46 pm

Ok- I’ve tried it twice and both times it has come out VERY dense. . . . almost gooey inside. My teenage boys still devour it, but it isn’t exactly what I was hoping for. I have never gotten the bread to the first stage of bubbles and darkening, even after 24 hours on the counter. Any suggestions??

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Tori March 4, 2013 at 7:01 am

Wow…the bread looks beautiful!! and so simple!! I LOVE IT! Some of us in our family have had to go “gluten-free”. Any chance you have the no-knead recipe in a gluten-free version? :)

Thanks again! Beautifully done post!

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Sandra March 5, 2013 at 5:17 pm

I would love to know if there is a gluten-free version too!

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Nicole Van Zandt March 3, 2013 at 11:57 am

Thanks for this amazing recipe! It has worked like a charm for me and the bread is delicious. I have never felt so empowered to bake bread. I think I’m going to call this “gateway” bread since it has inspired me to try other recipes. I do recommend using the wax paper instead of the flour-coated tea towel for the second rise and the flip. For some reason when I tried a tea towel the dough really got stuck, even though I covered the towel copiously with flour beforehand. It’s not easy washing raw dough out of fabric, as I’ve now discovered.

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Peanut Lady March 2, 2013 at 6:19 am

Hi! Thanks for the recipe!

How do you think this could be modified with oat or coconut flours? In my early experiments with other recipes, I’ve found you need to add a lot more liquid. I have not been able to perfect this, though, and am hoping that someone has some suggestions?

I have a few cups of each leftover from a previous recipe and thought they may be incoporated here. Thanks!

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KKB February 28, 2013 at 6:48 am

Wondering about the temp while it is on the cabinet – thinking making it while camping and how warm is too warm for it to set out overnight. We only use the fireplace in the winter for heat, and its not uncommon for it to never get above 60 degrees in their. How temperamental is this going to be? Can’t wait to try it!

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Heather February 26, 2013 at 10:52 pm

Hi,
I have been searching all over the Internet for an artisan recipe that
Can be made with whole wheat. Have u tried this recipe of
Yours with whole wheat? The recipes i found are just to dense. they dont have the chewey texture or air pockets. Maybe do half white half wheat? I also
Am wanting to make loaf artisan. I love the simple dump into Dutch oven
But would like loaf bread for sandwiches. How can I go about that?

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Emily February 27, 2013 at 8:34 pm

I’ve never made this recipe with 100% whole wheat, though I know others have. I usually do 50/50 with whole wheat and white flours to give it a slightly lighter texure. Whole wheat bread is dense so you might have to pick what you want – whole wheat or air pockets.

I use this bread for sandwiches, toast, whatever. You could easily cut the recipe in half, shape it into 1-2 loaves and baked it in a loaf pan. It won’t have the same exact qualities as this rustic-style artisan bread, but it’ll still be a delicious loaf of bread!

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Vosskkb February 23, 2013 at 10:41 pm

This is the best bread ever!!! I make it at least twice a week and now add garlic,rosemary and herbs de Provence to it every time. DELISH

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Sara February 23, 2013 at 7:09 am

It looks great, but my husband mentioned it smells like home-made playdough. Now I can’t stop thinking that when I eat it. I made the wheat version and only used all purpose flour. I wonder if bread flour would make a difference in the playdough smell taste? Or maybe I didn’t bake it long enough? I’ll try a new one this week and see.

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Bruce Carrie February 21, 2013 at 1:18 pm

I enjoyed the no-knead bread recipe so much, especially the crust, I tweaked it into rolls.
For the final rising, I cut the dough into 16 balls and pre-heated stoneware bowls instead of a dutch oven.
Baked dough in the bowls for 20 min at 425°.
It took two batches, but the rolls were easy to lift from the bowls when they were done. (Careful, they’re hot!)

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Liz February 21, 2013 at 12:06 pm

My family loves this bread!! Thank you so much for the recipe we are making it about twice a week, love it so easy. Can you add other ingredients to it like shredded cheese for different flavors or would it ruin the recipe? Thank you!

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Emily February 21, 2013 at 1:26 pm

Yes! Check out our FAQ’s for some add-in ingredient ideas, including cheese. http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/

Mix any add-ins into your dry ingredients (flour, salt, yeast), stir to combine, add water and proceed as written.

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kristin February 21, 2013 at 5:10 am

I made this a couple Weeks ago and it turned out delicious! I do not own a Dutch oven so I baked it in corningware with a lid and it turned out beautifully. I also have mini bowls so I literally used scissors to cut the dough and made bread bowls. They were awesome! Thought I would share if anyone else wanted to do the same:-)

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Eileen February 20, 2013 at 9:41 am

FANTASTIC!! Just like the bakery. My friends loved it. Will be a staple from now on.

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Stephanie Morton February 19, 2013 at 6:29 pm

I am about to make this bread, but with a husband who eats bread like its going out of style, I was wondering if you can freeze these loaves after they are baked? Or should I just make a new one each time we run out?

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Stephanie Morton February 19, 2013 at 6:56 pm

Nevermind, i just read the FAQ’s

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Leslie Sweet February 18, 2013 at 11:13 am

I cannot wait to try this! And glad I found your site. I love having fresh baked bread around, but a baker I am not…so you may have just made my day! Thanks!

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Emily February 19, 2013 at 9:19 pm

Glad you found us, Leslie. You can totally do this. Let us know how your first loaf turns out!

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Taryn February 17, 2013 at 6:50 pm

Hi! Thank you SO MUCH for posting this… I’ve never made bread before and now I am TOTALLY HOOKED! My hubby was so proud.

I do have a question or need your advice, rather. Have you made different flavors using this recipe? Any tips on how to do that? Spices, cheesy bread, etc. Thanks again!!

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Emily February 19, 2013 at 9:34 pm

I’m so happy you are hooked on baking bread from scratch!! Check out the FAQ’s for some add-in ideas. http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/no-knead-bread-answers-to-faqs/ You could really add any combination that floats your boat!

Add any extra ingredients to the dry ingredients (flour, salt, yeast) and stir to combine. Then add the water and proceed as written.

Happy baking!

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Brianne February 16, 2013 at 8:12 pm

Great tip storing the bread in the dutch oven. I’ve been making no knead bread for years, and this is prob the best tip I’ve learned. Makes total sense to store it in the pot it was baked in!

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Bernie February 15, 2013 at 4:06 pm

I’ve tried to extract the recipe from this explanation but cannot fully do so. I do not see the recipe at the bottom of the post. If you can, please let me know what it is. I would love to try it! Thanks!

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Cal February 28, 2013 at 10:08 am

6 cups bread flour (recommended) or all-purpose flour, plus more for work surface
1/2 t. instant or active-dry yeast
2 1/2 t. salt
2 2/3 c. cool water

In a large bowl, combine the flour, yeast, and salt. Add the water and stir until all the ingredients are well incorporated; the dough should be wet and sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest 12-18 hours on the counter at room temperature. When surface of the risen dough has darkened slightly, smells yeasty, and is dotted with bubbles, it is ready.
Lightly flour your hands and a work surface. Place dough on work surface and sprinkle with more flour. Fold the dough over on itself once or twice and, using floured fingers, tuck the dough underneath to form a rough ball.
Generously dust a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with enough flour, cornmeal, or wheat bran to prevent the dough from sticking to the towel as it rises; place dough seam side down on the towel and dust with more flour, cornmeal, or wheat bran. Cover with the edges or a second cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours, until it has doubled in size.
After about 1 1/2 hours, preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place a 6-8 quart heavy covered pot, such as a cast-iron Dutch oven, in the oven as it heats. When the dough has fully risen, carefully remove pot from oven. Remove top towel from dough and slide your hand under the bottom towel; flip the dough over into pot, seam side up. Shake pan once or twice if dough looks unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes.
Cover and bake for 40 minutes. Uncover and continue baking for 10-15 more minutes, until the crust is a deep chestnut brown. The internal temperature of the bread should be around 200 degrees. You can check this with a meat thermometer, if desired.
Remove the bread from the pot and let it cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

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Carrie February 14, 2013 at 7:18 pm

Would it be possible to use glass loaf pans instead of the dutch oven?

thanks!

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Jann Swanson February 15, 2013 at 5:56 am

You would need to cover the loaf pans – although putting a pan of water in the oven might have the same results (pre-heat pan, pour in water after placing bread on rack, immediately close door) – but the glass part is not problem. I halve the recipe and use a covered Pyrex casserole, reducing the heat to 380. Turns out just like the pictures.

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Carrie February 15, 2013 at 6:44 pm

Great, thanks for the information, Jann!

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Luisa February 13, 2013 at 1:18 pm

What is the secret to the crust? I mean, what part of the recipe/instructions is responsible for creating the wonderful crust I see in the pictures? Our bread (following this same recipe) has not turned out nice and crusty like that in all of our tries.

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Emily February 14, 2013 at 10:01 pm

Hi, Luisa- Do you bake it in a heavy lidded pot? The pot traps the steam from the dough, resulting in a nice, crisp crust.

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Luisa February 14, 2013 at 10:21 pm

Thanks for the reply! Yes, we got a Lodge Logic Dutch oven (non-enamel) and follow all the instructions. The bread tastes great—but seeing the great crust on the pictures here make our attempts look like ‘duds’ by comparison. We’ll keep on trying!

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Brooke February 12, 2013 at 12:54 pm

I was just about to buy one of the lodge Dutch ovens and would prefer to get one of pretty glazed ones but in the info it states that the lid handle is only oven save to 400 degrees. Has this been a problem for anyone?

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Emily February 12, 2013 at 4:12 pm

Hi, Brooke – I cover my Lodge handle with foil just to be safe. You can also buy replacement knobs that look much better: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/online-deals/dutch-oven-replacement-knobs/

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Nichole February 10, 2013 at 7:49 pm

Hello :) I’ve made this bread a few times and love adding things to it. I haven’t quite figured out cinnamon raisin yet. I was wondering what other bread add ins have been done.

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Nancy March 13, 2013 at 12:07 pm

I have added fresh grated parmesan cheese and dried dill and it was delicious!

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Kristen March 15, 2013 at 10:59 am

I make a version of this bread that has slightly different ingredient amounts, but should be close enough that the add-ins would still work out fine. Here’s our favorites so far:
Feta and fresh rosemary
Blue Cheese and Caramelized Onion
Cinnamon Raison (need to add a little sugar)

I’m also planning to try a cheddar jalapeno at some point. And after reading Nancy’s suggestion, will also be trying the parmesan dill. :)

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Robin February 9, 2013 at 7:10 pm

I used my soup pot, and right now, its taking all I’ve got to wait for it to cool to enjoy :)

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Julie February 8, 2013 at 6:57 pm

Could you use a stoneware baking bowl with a lid to make this bread? Looks Delish! I’m excited to try it.

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Emily February 8, 2013 at 10:35 pm

Hi Julie! I am almost positive people have left comments reporting success using covered stoneware dishes. I would just double check that it is rated for such high heat.

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Laurie March 6, 2013 at 3:57 pm

I absolutely love this recipe! I found a used clay cooking pot with a lid at a thrift shop. Pampered Chef has a no knead recipe on their website that explains how to use a clay pot. However the recipe on this site is so much easier to make so use this one!

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Lisa February 8, 2013 at 10:28 am

I have a smaller Le Creuset – is it possible to halve the recipe to make a smaller loaf? I feel like sometimes when I bake, halving or doubling doesn’t work well. Thoughts? Thanks!

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Laura, SW Pdx February 8, 2013 at 10:47 am

I did half a few days ago and it turned out fine. Lid on apx 30 and then off last 10 or so. I only wished I had a smaller Le Creuset so it would have been fuller – less flat. So, that is now on my shopping list!

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Lyninnm February 9, 2013 at 8:39 pm

Hi, Laura – Wanted to let you know that I make half the recipe like this: I put a cake pan inside my Dutch oven, cover it and preheat it. Then I plop the dough into the ungreased cake pan which is in the Dutch oven and bake. It comes out with nice sides and a high, round top. My cake pan is a “real” cake pan,
2-1/2 inches high and 7 inches in diameter. (David Lebovitz did a whole riff on “real” cake pans!) The Dutch oven is 6 inches high and 10 inches in diameter. I hope this helps you – it sure helped me – too bad it took me forever to think of it.

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Kristina February 7, 2013 at 5:00 pm

I have been wanting to learn to make my own bread for awhile and finally convinced myself to spend the $80 on a dutch oven to try out this recipe :) I picked up some flour and yeast on the way home and was finally going to give it a try.

Well I realized when I got home I picked up Bob Redmills “Whole Wheat Pastry Flour” instead of bread flour. I have never used pastry flour before, in fact I have never even heard of it. Do you know if this will work with pastry flour?

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WVBonBonQueen February 4, 2013 at 12:00 pm

I tried this recipe, it is wonderful!!! My hubby loves it and it stays fresh a long time, longer than my usual homemade bread does.
It is great toasted, or just with butter.
I love the crust, it is exactly what I like in bread, a bit tough but very tasty and lots of crunch.
I have tried “sour dough” bread before, this one is the easiest of all.
Just had to tell you how much we like this bread and hope to see lots of different recipes that I will use here as I go thru the site and glean info from it. Thanks for the recipe!!!

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Jacqueline Grimes February 3, 2013 at 9:06 am

I have used your recipes a couple of times and have loved it. I recently prepared it using a levain or wild yeast. LOVE IT!

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paula February 3, 2013 at 8:33 am

Hi!

I have my dough rising right now. I just had a question. I had to use a lot more than 2 2/3 c water to hydrate the 6 cups of flour. Comparing photos of my dough and the pictures, I have double the amount. I followed the recipe (for whole wheat molasses). So I used the written amount of yeast and salt. Is this alright? Did anyone had problems hydrating 6c of flour with the written amount of water for recipe?

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Emily February 3, 2013 at 10:11 pm

Hi, Paula! This dough is slightly different every time I mix it together. The heat and humidity of your home, the flour you use, and the way you measure your ingredients can all affect the moisture level of the dough. Simply add water as needed to create a wet, but manageable dough. See the FAQ’s for more. Hope that helps!

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Michelle March 5, 2013 at 9:21 am

I use about an extra 2/3cup water every time I make this (4th time today)

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Matt B February 3, 2013 at 6:58 am

So I got a new glazed Dutch oven and the loaf stuck to it like a kid to his mother in a barber shop. I didn’t see anything about greasing the Dutch oven. Help?

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Chris February 3, 2013 at 10:33 am

Did you preheat the Dutch oven along with your oven? The pot is so hot that it sears the bottom of the bread when you dump it in. I have made about a dozen loaves and have never once had it stick. Try the parchment paper method.

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Matt B February 3, 2013 at 9:12 pm

I pre-heated it with the oven, starting cold then to 425. Maybe I should let it heat up uncovered?

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Amy K February 17, 2013 at 8:41 am

I crinkle up a piece of aluminum foil, uncrinkle, put in bottom of dutch oven, rise my loaf on parchment drop the whole thing in the pan, i don’t flip it or anything tricky, bake it and it turns out perfect every time!

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Emily February 3, 2013 at 10:08 pm

Hi, Matt B! If you have issues with the dough sticking, you can either quickly wipe the hot Dutch oven with some oil before dumping the dough in (I personally do this) or you could use a square of parchment paper between the dough and the bottom of the pot. Either option works great!

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judy February 1, 2013 at 6:01 pm

I just killed a 200 dollar le Creuset. I have made this bread 15 times and it is different every time. This time it was super sticky and I don’t think the pan was preheat ed enough. My bad.

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Julie February 1, 2013 at 6:08 am

I just made this and it turned out wonderful! Looks just like the picture. The only thing I did different was after letting it rise, I flipped it from one piece of parchment to a 2nd piece (floured) and then just lifted the whole thing into the hot pan. That way when it was done, all I had to do was lift the paper out, bread and all, then slide it onto a cooling rack. It’s cooling now and I can’t wait to get into it. BTW…the house smelled sooooo good! Everyone needs to try this one. So easy a caveman could do it. :)

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Carrie January 31, 2013 at 10:19 am

I am going to try this recipe, but I want to use a wheat flour. You mentioned substituting it for 3 cups of the all-purpose flour. Does that mean I should still use 3 cups of bread or all-purpose flour with the 3 cups of wheat flour? I am not an expert baker and have never made bread from scratch.

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Emily January 31, 2013 at 4:05 pm

No problem, Carrie! I need to fix that wording, as that question comes up frequently. If you want to use wheat flour, I’d recommend 3 cups wheat and 3 white. Happy baking! You can totally do this.

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Daisy January 30, 2013 at 1:26 pm

I’ve messed the recipe up somehow! :( After 18 hours, the dough in the bowl looked just like the photo – but when I tried to work it into a ball, it just ran like a blob all over the place. I used white spelt flour, active dry yeast (new jar), sea salt and filtered water. I want to try again – but I don’t know what to do differently next time. Has anyone else run into this problem? Thanks!

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Nathalie January 31, 2013 at 7:25 am

Hey Daisy I have the same problem but I will still pop it one the oven. How did yours turn out ?

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Paula January 31, 2013 at 11:59 am

Spelt flour is very fragile – you can;t overwork it or your dough will just fall flat. Try using all-purpose flour or even freshly ground whole wheat first, and gradually replace some of it with spelt in future loaves, until you are an expert at handling it gently!

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Emily January 31, 2013 at 4:13 pm

Hi, Daisy – Did you try baking it, even though it was tricky to handle? I’m 99% sure it would have still turned out great. If your dough is too wet and, well… blobby, just add 1 T. of flour at a time (see the FAQ’s for more) until it is still wet but easier to handle. Blobs are fine; you just don’t want it so runny that you can’t work with it. Hope you give it another shot!

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Daisy January 31, 2013 at 8:43 pm

After about 24 hours, I poured it in the pot and baked it. Although the finished piece looked pathetic ;) it had the texture of a nice, dense loaf and good taste (my kids ate every bit that wasn’t stuck to the pot.) I’m glad to learn that the problem was likely my handling of the spelt – I am definitely going to try it again with a hard wheat flour. Thanks, everyone, for your help!!

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Daisy February 4, 2013 at 3:19 pm

So….it must have been the spelt flour b/c I’ve made the recipe three more times now with a hard wheat and it worked wonderfully!! (I can’t believe the difference – the spelt “dough” was like pancake batter when I poured it the pan to bake.) This experience also helped me with a (spelt) sourdough starter that was limping along – it’s doing much better now that I am feeding it bread flour :)

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Paula February 4, 2013 at 3:24 pm

I am glad it’s working with regular flour! My MIL gave me a lot of spelt last summer, and it was a learning experience, I tell you! I tried making baguettes, but they were more like elongated pan cakes until I learned how to use spelt! LOL!

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cher February 12, 2013 at 3:53 pm

When using spelt flour I’ve found that I need about 1/2-1 C extra flour….it is lighter/pound than wheat, so the measurements are off…if you’ve done it with wheat and know what the texture was, do it with spelt adding more flour until you get the same consistancy….It is still a little harder to form into a loaf but, I also think that spelt gives the finished product a lighter texture.

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Ellen January 29, 2013 at 11:45 am

Perfect!

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Harmony January 29, 2013 at 5:04 am

Yes actually I was the 1 who said to turn your oven on 400 degrees for 1 minute then turn it off and turn the oven light on. The oven will then be the perfect temperature for your bread to rise I know that 400 degree seems like a lot but trust me it works.. my house never gets above 68 degrees so I use this trick all of the time! The short time the oven is on 400 degrees is not enough to cook the bread.. good luck with it!

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Pegg January 28, 2013 at 11:11 am

Actually preheating the oven to 400 and then turning it off should do the trick. Just keep the oven closed and the interior light on. I heat my oven to 100 and do the same thing. If I need to repeat it half way through the rise time it’s not a big deal. It works wonders. I would worry about it being at 400 because that is near cooking temp. We only want to stimulate the yeast!

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Skye January 28, 2013 at 10:50 am

My house is cooler than 55. I saw someone state leave oven on 400* for one min. and turn off to rise. I assume the meant one hour but not sure. I don’t think 1 min.will do it. Any other ideas please for bread to rise in a very cool house. Thanks.

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Shelley January 28, 2013 at 9:58 am

I cannot wait to try this out!

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Chris January 27, 2013 at 10:50 am

I finally made this into rolls. I used 1/2 a recipe (3 c. flour). After the initial rise I divided the dough into 12 dinner rolls. Let them rise for 2 hours and then baked them in a large diameter dutch oven (some rolls were slightly touching) at 425 for about 25 minutes, then 5 minutes with the top off. They are just as wonderful as the bread.

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Bethany January 25, 2013 at 6:01 pm

I have a well earned reputation as a bread baking failure. I ruined my reputation with this recipe today. :)

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Lauren January 22, 2013 at 10:13 am

I tried this over the long weekend, and LOVED it! Such a huge loaf, and it was definitely better than anything you can buy in a store.

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Danielle January 21, 2013 at 10:44 am

I LOVE THIS RECIPE!!! I make at least 1 loaf per week. But I have been wanting to go Gluten free for a quick spell – has anyone made this bread using Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Flour? If so, how much xanthan gum and/or other additives do you use?
Any help is appreciated – the flour is super expensive, so I don’t want to screw it up too much. =o)

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Clare January 20, 2013 at 6:14 pm

Just wanted to say, THANK YOU!!! I have made 6 loaves so far since Christmas, including white, cranberry/pecan, rye/caraway & whole wheat. Loved all the tips from fellow bakers. All are favorites of family and friends. I now own 2 dutch ovens a 6 qt & 3 qt (a thrift shop find). Have many family & friends buying dutch ovens & making the bread too. This recipe is truly AMAZING.

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Sedef January 20, 2013 at 12:00 pm

Thanks so much for sharing this, I’ve made the bread three times and it was perfect. Today’s batch I split into two and added roasted garlic to one and black olives to the other. I added the flavorings after the first rise and they came out great!

It’s so easy and so yummy, I can’t imagine buying bread ever again.

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Megan January 19, 2013 at 8:50 pm

Thank you so much!! Made this today and my family fell head over heels in love!! So super easy….I even stirred the flour, yeast and water with a baby in one arm! Can’t wait to make another loaf :)

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Lorna January 16, 2013 at 3:15 pm

Have you tried to do this with gluten free flour?

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Donna January 17, 2013 at 4:03 am

No I haven’t…I did try making another loaf with the bread flour again. I mixed it a little more than my first loaf…we’ll see later today. If it doesn’t work I’ll try gluten free, thanks.

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Doinna January 16, 2013 at 6:48 am

My first try at making this bread was not a complete success. The loaf looked beautiful and the taste was great, but the bread was very heavy…what did I do wrong? Are u measuring the bread flour by cup or by weight?

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Emily January 20, 2013 at 8:52 pm

If the bread was dense and gummy, it’s probably a sign that it wasn’t baked quite long enough. I’d try increasing your bake time by at least 5 minutes. Also make sure the dough is wet and the rise time is long enough. And yes, I measure flour by cup. Hope that helps!

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kelly January 14, 2013 at 8:52 pm

This recipe …and your blog excite me! I love a good recipe on the cheap. Can’t wait to try it!

xx Kelly

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harmony January 14, 2013 at 7:39 pm

JEANNE here is what I do because my house is never above 68 degrees all year, I read this somewhere and do it all the time & it works perfectly. Turn your oven on 400 degrees and set the timer for one minute, when the timer goes off turn off the oven and place your bowl in there for the amount of time needed. It works really well and sometimes I leave the oven light on for a little extra warmth! Try it and see if it works for you :)

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Billie January 14, 2013 at 5:28 pm

Jeanne… I’ve used a heating pad on low.

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Jeanne January 14, 2013 at 5:14 pm

I live in Northern Nevada and it is REALLY cold here right now, only 25 during the day today. My house is not that warm. Will this bread take longer that 18 hours to rise because of that, or is there something I can do? I have an electric oven, so no pilot light to “keep it warm”.
Thanks!

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Jann Swanson January 12, 2013 at 11:29 am

I made the bread two days ago and, although I am an experienced bread maker and dough handler, this was the hardest dough I have ever worked with because it was so wet. It was raining which may have been the problem. I worked in a lot more flour but If I hadn’t already decided to use the parchment paper suggestion above for “flipping” reasons I would never have been able to get it off the floured towel and had problems pulling it free from the parts of the towel that covered the top.
Having sufficiently bitched and moaned, the results were sensational. While I have loved the 5-minute artisan bread and will continue to make when I don’t have a lot of lead time, it it doesn’t have a crackling crust like this one nor does it appear to have as long a shelf life.

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Jann Swanson January 12, 2013 at 11:28 am

I made the bread two days ago and, although I am an experienced bread maker and dough handler, this was the hardest dough I have ever worked with because it was so wet. It was raining which may have been the problem. I worked in a lot more flour but If I hadn’t already decided to use the parchment paper suggestion above for “flipping” reasons I would never have been able to get it off the floured towel and had problems pulling it free from the parts of the towle that covered the top.
Having sufficiently bitched and moaned, the results were sensational. While I have loved the 5-minute artisan bread and will continue to make when I don’t have a lot of lead time, it it doesn’t have a crackling crust like this one nor does it appear to have as long a shelf life.

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Stephanie January 12, 2013 at 10:08 am

I am getting ready to make my fourth loaf of this bread for my family! I cannot explain just how happy I am that I found this amazing recipe that is both easy and truly the best bread my family has had in a long time! So satisfying to make myself. Thank you thank you thank you!!

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SuzieQ January 10, 2013 at 6:58 pm

I was going to try the bread bowl idea as well. This is such a great recipe. Made it once with rosemary and another time with Italian seasoning. Tastes really good days later.

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Pegg January 10, 2013 at 5:50 am

Has anybody tried making this into bread bowls? I think it would be awesome as such! If so can you share some pointers? Thanks

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Chris January 9, 2013 at 10:26 am

Has anyone tried making rolls out of this recipe? I was thinking 12 rolls out of half a recipe. I just don’t know how long it would take to bake them.

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Kelly January 9, 2013 at 10:23 am

Oh my gosh. I know you posted this a year ago, but I just found it, and I’ve just received my first ‘real’ dutch oven! (it’s an 8qt, oval one, so excited (>.<) )
So after following your recipe it turned out gorgeous!! I have tried other ones, and for some reason, they did not turn out as good as this one! I used All Purpose flour though, because that is all I had.
Thank you very much for posting this wonderful recipe with the instructive pictures too!

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Dusty January 8, 2013 at 1:09 pm

Hmmmm…. Just set my first batch to rise, but realize now that I may not be able to get to forming stage for 24 hours or so. Anyone know if the dough can sit, risen and ready, for a bit without drying out or getting otherwise funky? Thanks!

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Emily January 8, 2013 at 6:03 pm

Hi, Dusty – As long as your house isn’t super warm, you should be just fine! Others have left comments of success with a first rise of 24-36 hours! Just keep it covered until you’re ready to shape it, and it won’t dry out.

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Sheebs January 7, 2013 at 10:19 am

Wonderfully easy and so good. Made with white flour this time, I think I’ll be trying it with wheat & rye in the near future.
I’ve been making our bread for about 10 years now and these no knead recipes are just the best. You can’t beat the crust!

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Christie January 7, 2013 at 6:43 am

Hi! Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I am baking bread again! My question is this: can the dough be stored in the fridge like artisan bread, and if yes, how long should the proving time be prior to that?
Thanks!

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Susan Locke January 7, 2013 at 2:12 am

I am eating this as I type… amazing and easy!!! Mine sat on the counter for almost 36 hours… didn’t look ready so I just let it hang out, and its sooooooo good! Thank you for this recipe! I also bought my dutch oven for this, too :)

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Gracie January 6, 2013 at 7:58 pm

I just made this bread and we love it. just started my second batch. i like the fact that it is so dense and still chewy. i’m going to spread this recipe to all my friends. and for all the people that claim they can’t make bread, they should give this recipe a try.

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Jen January 6, 2013 at 2:46 pm

Amazing recipe! Simple too!
I made wheat bread from this recipe and it turned out fantastic. :) This will forever be my go to recipe for home made bread!

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Maria Telegdy January 6, 2013 at 5:59 am

Hello,
I just found your blog (webpage) and I like the photo demos of making the no-knead bread. I did use the 12-18 hr. method of rising the dough for the last 4 years, luckily for me, my very first bread I baked this year, I did not had the time to let it rise overnight, so I mixed it and baked it, only after 3-4 hrs of rising, and of course 1 extra hr. before baking, and my bread was the best so far. I will never again go back to 18 hr. rising time. I need to mention I live at an altitude of over 5500ft. in beautiful Colorado and for high altitude baking I use the so called “Hungarian flour” that was especially formulated for high altitude baking. I think all recipes are valuable and the results can be wonderful, only if someone takes the time to change a little bit here and there, if the original recipe doesn’t works. I’m proud to say, I cook since I was 6 years old (baking I took up about 10 years ago, so I’m not afraid to experiment a bit. For me what works is more important than, to follow the recipe to the dot and not having a successful result.
Otherwise, the 3 cup flour no-knead recipe is enough for 2 people in my household for 2 days, so I’m baking every other day, sometimes every day, if I feel like dropping off a loaf to my neighbors.:-)

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Lyninnm January 6, 2013 at 4:18 pm

Hi, Maria! I am at the same altitude, but in New Mexico. I have had fabulous results with this recipe, but am going to try your method this week. Our house is really, really cold at night and the oven light doesn’t provide enough warmth either. It will be fun to try to complete the process during a sunny day. The house is passive solar and is toasty in the daytime. Thanks so much for the tip.

Emily, thank you for your terrific version of this recipe and for keeping this thread going. The comments are extremely helpful and are fun to read!

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Michelle January 6, 2013 at 1:12 am

Hi! I’ve made this recipe a dozen times & love it! I have dough rising right now but for the first time I cut the recipe in half. Does the bake time remain the same?

Thank you!

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Emily January 6, 2013 at 2:32 pm

Hi, Michelle! Glad to hear you’ve had such good success with this recipe.

Bake a half recipe at 425 for 30 min. covered, 5-10 min. uncovered. (check for golden crust and 200-degree internal temp.)

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Kristi Niclas January 5, 2013 at 9:13 am

oooh! i am so excited to try this! has anyone tried a gluten free recipe using this method?? my husband and i try to go that direction as often as we can.
i see that “Alyssa-Queen of Quinoa” has a gluten free recipe that you used?? would you be willing to share? :)

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Sarah January 4, 2013 at 3:38 pm

I have the first batch rising now. The only yeast I could find was traditional yeast. I just added it to the flour, will that increase rising time, and have to be close to the 18 hour mark? I’m hoping to make it tomorrow before I go to work, (there might be some left when I get home) I guess I’ll just watch the dough and see how it rises. I can’t wait. I used to do needed bread and get 4 small loaves but we would have the bread gone in no time. I’m eager to try this and maybe make a loaf every day or so.

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Liz Donahower January 4, 2013 at 11:23 am

Leave the final rise ON the cornmeal covered parchment paper and LEAVE it on the parchment paper while baking in the pot, that way you don’t have to take the chance of burning yourself on the hot pot during the flip.

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Emily January 4, 2013 at 3:26 pm

Yes, this can be an easier, neater option. I’d also recommend slashing the top of the loaf with a sharp knife. The benefit of flipping the dough is that it flips the bottom seam onto the top of the loaf to create the beautiful, cracked top crust. You lose out on that when you just lift and set it into the pot.

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SANDRA January 3, 2013 at 11:07 am

Believe it or not, Big Lots often has Bob’s Red Mill products very cheap! (including Organic!)

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Lynn January 3, 2013 at 3:30 pm

Ty for that info. Did not know that and it is a mile away!

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Max January 1, 2013 at 3:23 pm

I made this and it was brilliant. No issues with rising, even on a cold metal countertop. Took about 12 hours.

I used fresh refrigerated yeast blocks instead of dry powder. I just used half a 50g block (so 25g). Seemed fine.

Also, I only had a glass pot, but I just turned down the heat to 425 instead to compensate.

It was SO much bigger than I expected (not a baker). I’d love to do it half the size. Is it better to halve the recipe, or cut off smaller chunks of the big dough?

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Max January 26, 2013 at 12:46 pm

400, not 425

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Emily January 26, 2013 at 4:27 pm

Hi, Max! I would just halve the recipe if you are looking for a smaller loaf. Those are close to the original amounts anyway. Bake for 30 minutes covered, 10 uncovered.

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Marianne December 31, 2012 at 12:16 pm

Where do you buy your groceries that you find Bob’s mill flour for less than 75 cents for six cups?

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Emily December 31, 2012 at 2:23 pm

I stockpile Bob’s flour whenever I can get 5 lb. bags (16.5 cups) for $2. So, about .12/cup of flour (6 cups = about 72 cents). I’m not sure how much Bob’s unbleached flour is in Winco’s bulk section?

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Jann Swanson December 31, 2012 at 9:10 am

I have been baking from the 5-minute cookbook for about 9 months to rave reviews so am anxious to try this one. I know the recipe I am using requires a non-stick loaf pan which is then heavily oiled. Is the cured cast iron so impervious to sticking that no oil is needed? I have never found mine to be quite that good.

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Emily December 31, 2012 at 2:30 pm

Hi, Jann! If you are nervous about the dough sticking, feel free to add a small amount of oil to the hot pot. Just rub it around quickly with a paper towel before flipping the bread in. I have rarely had issues with sticking, but if my dough is really wet, sometimes I use oil in the pot just in case.

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Jann Swanson December 31, 2012 at 4:03 pm

Thanks – am anxious to try (as soon as the current 5-minute Artisanal loaf is eaten.)

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Charmante January 11, 2013 at 11:13 am

I find that if I don’t heat the Dutch oven (cast iron with no enamel) a full 30 minutes before throwing the dough from the above recipe in, then I have problems with sticking. But if I heat it correctly, the bread easily flips out without any greasing.

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Alyssa | Queen of Quinoa December 31, 2012 at 7:58 am

I use this same method for my gluten-free breads and it works beautifully every single time. Crusty on the outside, soft and pillowy on the inside. Your bread looks sensational!

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Rita December 31, 2012 at 8:17 am

What recipe do you use for the gluten free? Quite a few questions regarding this………….. Thanks!

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Rachel January 15, 2013 at 4:54 pm

I would also like any info on using this method with GF bread

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Emily January 15, 2013 at 9:17 pm

I haven’t personally tried it, but here’s a GF recipe using this baking method: http://glutenfreegirl.com/i-am-stubborn-i-dont-give-up/

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Rita January 16, 2013 at 7:38 am

Thank you Emily! I will try this!

Jennifer December 31, 2012 at 5:26 am

I found in the FAQs that some readers have tried some additions (cinnamon and raisins for instance), but it doesn’t say when to add them. Do you just add them when you first mix the dough? Thanks!

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Emily December 31, 2012 at 2:45 pm

Jennifer, here are two previous comments to answer your question. Hope that helps!

From Gaille: I always add to the dry ingredients before adding the water to make the dough. Comes out perfect!

From Heather: I made this recipe, but I added two bunches of rosemary and 1 1/2 heads of garlic in with the flour and yeast. I didn’t pre-roast the garlic and the recipe turned out amazing.

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Hosanna December 30, 2012 at 6:43 pm

I received my first dutch oven for Christmas and have had this recipe of yours bookmarked for a long time. It’s the first thing I made in it and it came out PERFECTLY! MY husband raved and raved and raved about my first dutch oven loaf of bread and I plan on experimenting with different flavors and sizes of bread using this recipe this upcoming week. Thanks for sharing!

-newly minted, happy bread baker

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Fatima December 30, 2012 at 12:57 pm

This is my 2nd time doing this bread and I love it. It is so easy . Thanks.

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Ana Rpo December 30, 2012 at 11:54 am

Just finished patting myself on the back after baking my second loaf in 48 hours! My father is the bread baker in the family and with the family in town for the holidays, well, we definitely had some bonding to do. I will be experimenting with different flavors soon. I followed the recipe exactly as stated. I used Fleischman’s Active Dry Yeast, NOT the Highly Active Yeast they make. I guess Ill be giving my Papi a run for his money :)

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Laurie December 29, 2012 at 5:36 pm

Here is a website that has a comparison of yeast. RapidRise and instant yeast are the same thing. The bags of yeast that I get at Sam’s Club are labeled “instant”. I think both would work. You should open the packets and use just a 1/2 teaspoon. If you can find a jar, it’s much easier to use. Keep it in the freezer and it will last forever!http://www.breadworld.com/rr_vs_ady.aspx

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Laurie December 29, 2012 at 5:35 pm

Here is a website that has a comparison of yeast. RapidRise and instant yeast are the same thing. The bags of yeast that I get at Sam’s Club are labeled “instant”. I think both would work. You should open the packets and use just a 1/2 teaspoon. If you can find a jar, it’s much easier to use. Keep it in the freezer and it will last forever!

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Dara December 29, 2012 at 2:21 pm

I’m no bread baker, that’s for sure, so when I saw this recipe it sounded like something even I could do. The first batch came out great, but like someone else said, it was REALLY sticky! The second batch was pretty much the same except it was even wetter and stickier than the first, and didn’t rise as much. It still was a huge hit and had great flavor.
One thing that has me confused is the yeast. The only thing available around here in my rural Kansas town is Fleischmann’s RapidRise Highly active Yeast packets, 1/4 oz in each. Now, on the back it says: “1 envelope dry yeast (1/4 oz) = 2-1/4 teaspoons = 1 cake fresh yeast (0.6 oz)” To me, that is saying that this packet contains 2 – 1/4 teaspoons, or 1/2 tsp, of yeast. But, it is clearly more than 1/2 teaspoon in the packet. So, because I was confused, I have been using a whole packet. Am I assuming wrong? Should I be using the 1/2 teaspoon instead and just seal up the rest in a baggie?

Thanks for taking the time to post this and even more, answer all of our questions :)

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Katy December 30, 2012 at 3:10 pm

A packet of yeast contains 2 and a 1/4 teaspoons. A lot of recipes call for a packet of yeast but if one calls for less, than you will need to measure out the amount you need and save the rest.

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Jennifer December 29, 2012 at 10:27 am

Thanks so much for this recipe. I went out and bought a dutch oven just so I could make this bread. It is just done baking- it looks beautiful and the house smells amazing. Can’t wait to take it for our friends’ dinner party tonight and try it!!

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Jennifer December 30, 2012 at 5:17 pm

The bread was fantastic! I already made another loaf for us to have here at home and have dough on the counter for another loaf I will bake tomorrow to take to a New Year’s Eve party. Thank you!

Can’t wait to try some other variations!

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claraboo December 28, 2012 at 12:14 pm

Do you have any suggestions on how to make a “flavored” bread using this method? I would love to make the garlic bread I’ve bought at Fred Meyer that has the full-sized cloves of garlic in it. I’ve never made bread before but this method looks like something I could handle!

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Emily December 28, 2012 at 5:47 pm

Hi, Claraboo – I love that kind of garlic bread! And yes, lots of readers have tried different add-ins, from sweet to savory. Check out the comments or FAQ’s for more details! If you want to roast the garlic first, here are the directions for that: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/how-to-roast-garlic-3-easy-steps/

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Rachael January 29, 2013 at 1:55 pm

Try the website Simply So Good. She posted this recipe a while ago and has offerred about 30 different flavor pairings she has made at the bottom of the post.
http://www.simplysogood.com/2010/03/crusty-bread.html

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Eric Bostrom December 27, 2012 at 7:49 pm

Thank you so much this bread was amazing, we all loved it!

Cooked my first batch this afternoon and I already have a second batch rising.

To all others, heed the 70f warning, our house dips to 60f at night and only ever gets to 68f max… Had to leave first batch in furnace room to get it to rise. Took 24hrs.

Second batch is rising in the oven with the oven light turn on for warmth.

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Ann December 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm

Have you tried it with rye flour?

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Emily December 28, 2012 at 8:56 am

Hi, Ann! I haven’t personally used rye flour for this bread, but someone else left a comment that they had tried it with great success. Here’s what they did: use a 1:2 ratio. (1 c. of rye for every 2 c. of regular flour). Optional: add 1 T. caraway seeds

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Angie December 27, 2012 at 10:48 am

I’m sorry for what might sound like a ridiculous question, but I’ve never baked before. Does t = teaspoon or tablespoon in your recipe?

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Emily December 27, 2012 at 10:55 am

Good question, Angie!

t = teaspoon
T = Tablespoon

This recipe is a great place to start. Let us know how your bread turns out!

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Susan December 27, 2012 at 8:13 am

I have just made batch #2 with this awesome recipe! Instead of a Dutch oven, I used two standard loaf pans, buttered. I let the dough raise in the loaf pans (for Step 3) and baked for 25 minutes, uncovered. Perfection! The loaves will be a bit flat on top, not rounded like regular kneaded bread, but the taste and texture are amazing!

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Kristina S December 25, 2012 at 1:16 pm

I asked for a dutch oven for Christmas and made this bread for the first other day. AMAZING! The only problem was that it started drying out before we could eat it all. If I split the loaf could half be frozen to bake later?

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Emily December 26, 2012 at 7:58 pm

It would probably just be easier to cut the recipe in half if you have a hard time eating it before it starts to dry out (Cut all ingredients in half and bake at 425 for 30 min. covered, 8-10 uncovered). The bread is generally soft on days 1-3. After that it starts to dry out. If you have leftovers, it works great as French toast, toast, grilled cheese sandwiches, breadcrumbs, croutons, etc.

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Laurie December 23, 2012 at 5:33 pm

My family was extremely pleased when I finally gave the ok to try the bread. There wasn’t much left for dinner! I borrowed a neighbor’s Lodge pot and now I really need to get one of my own since this is my new favorite bread. If you buy the large bags of yeast at a wholesale club, they will forever (at least 18 months past the use by date!) if you keep it in the freezer. Sometimes I get lucky and find bread flour at Sam’s Club at a good price. Thank you!

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Colleen December 23, 2012 at 8:36 am

I am so glad that I found your recipe. I love to bake bread on the weekends for my family and experiment with different recipes. This is the easiest bread I have ever made. I used a pampered chef pot to bake the bread…it is perfect. My mother owns several dutch ovens and she bakes bread all the time the conventional way. I can’t wait to share this with her. Thank you.

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Eddie December 22, 2012 at 2:30 pm

Took it out of the oven about and hour ago. Came out wonderful. Looks exactly like the loaves above. Has a great crust and nice airy inside. So easy — will make many more. Thanks

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Leslie December 21, 2012 at 2:57 pm

This is a great recipe for crusty Artisan bread. I have tried many bread recipes & it always comes out tasteless! I omitted the plate and just added a little more flour & turned it several times on the parchment paper. I then flopped it into my ungreased Dutch oven. I will be making this again with garlic, onions, rosemary, & black pepper seasoning. Thank you!

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Lynn December 20, 2012 at 10:36 am

Try reading all the comments before asking questions! I read thru them all so that I could make sure I wasn’t repeating myself. Emily has done an amazing job answering them! Also you can check to have the comments come to your email so that you can read the suggestions and comments for new ideas!

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Jolindy December 18, 2012 at 1:47 pm

Hi Emily – I use almond-flour (am gluten-intolerant, and am experimenting with flour options). Can I substitute almond or even potato flour with the ordinary flour used in this recipe?

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jude December 17, 2012 at 10:17 am

My second loaf and I did it w half wheat flour. Amazing! I am wondering if I can form small rolls and cook them the same way in the dutch oven or will handling the dough ruin it.

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Harmony December 16, 2012 at 8:54 pm

I’m making this bread now, my uncle sent me almost the same recipe but its just half the recipe and the temp is 450 for 30 mins & 10 mins w/lid off, I let it rise 21 hours, it didn’t seem to rise like I expected but it bubbled and it double from original size. I only have a 5 quart oval Dutch oven. Has anyone used an oval one before? Also mine didn’t really shape into a ball but spread out on the parchment a little but it’s in the oven now so we shall see! I’m so excited to taste it and I only hope it looks half as gorgeous as yours :) next time ill double the recipe

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Leila January 11, 2013 at 12:39 pm

I actually think an oval one would make it more sandwich friendly than round. Good luck!

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Cindy December 16, 2012 at 8:17 pm

Dumb question I know but, do I need to sift the flour? I’m asking for a Dutch oven for Christmas. :0). Looking forward to trying this.

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Emily December 31, 2012 at 2:33 pm

Hi, Cindy! No need to sift the flour!

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Rebekah December 16, 2012 at 7:10 pm

How many servings does this make? I’m thinking of making individual loaves (somehow!) for bread bowls.

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Emily December 16, 2012 at 8:20 pm

Hi, Rebekah! This recipe will give you a large 2.5 pound loaf. I would say 24-30 half slices (12-15 large slices) of bread? Trying bread bowls is next on my list, too!

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Jamie December 15, 2012 at 9:52 am

What would happen if i use self rising flour? That is all i have right now.

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Deb December 14, 2012 at 9:23 am

We keep our home very cool (62-65) will the dough rise okay?

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Leila December 13, 2012 at 5:27 pm

I came across this post on Pinterest. My 4 year old and I assembled the ingredients this evening. My dough wasn’t wet though- very sticky but not wet. I added about 1/4 cup more water, is that a bad thing? Also, I noticed there isn’t any fat in the bread, but all my other recipes include EVOO or butter (oh! and sugar!)- what gives? And finally, I just want to be sure- the recipe you posted is your double recipe right? There was so much of it, I had to switch to a bigger mixing bowl midway. I am a little worried I won’t be able to bake it all in my dutch oven, can I cut it to make two loaves? Thanks so much!

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Emily December 13, 2012 at 7:22 pm

Hi, Leila! Glad you are trying this recipe.

The dough will turn out a bit differently for everyone depending on the temperature and/or humidity in your home. How you measure ingredients can also make a difference. Sometimes I need to add extra water, sometimes I don’t. Your wet dough should be just fine! If it is too wet to handle after that initial 12-18 hour rise, just add a little flour, 1 Tablespoon at a time, until you can quickly form it into a rough ball with your hands.

There’s no fat in this recipe. Adding butter or oil makes a bread softer/more tender. This bread has a soft, chewy interior but it dries out faster than your typical sandwich bread or rolls.

No sugar either. I have added molasses or honey with great results. I know others have added a little sugar for bigger air holes in their bread. I like it just fine without (traditional baguette/rustic bread: just flour, water, yeast, and salt).

And finally, this does make a large loaf. A 5-7 quart Dutch oven works great. If yours is smaller, you could split it into two loaves when you shape the dough for the second rise. You can bake them at the same time if you have two pots.

Hope that helps!

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Leila December 14, 2012 at 5:35 am

Thank you so much!

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Leila December 14, 2012 at 10:07 am

Eeek! It worked!! Its so pretty!! Thanks again!

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Leila December 14, 2012 at 1:34 pm

And we tasted it! Awesome. I think you are my new favorite person.

Lisa December 11, 2012 at 11:16 am

Pretty sure THIS is one of my biggest accomplishments in life…being able to make my own bread :) Thank you so much for sharing.

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BSN December 10, 2012 at 1:41 pm

Found this on pinterest and made it today! AMAZZZZING!! It’s SOOO beautiful and tastes great! Thanks so much for sharing!

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Gina December 10, 2012 at 8:54 am

When do I add cheese and herbs?? I can hardly wait to make this bread!!

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vonda fry December 8, 2012 at 1:59 pm

has anyone had success with gluten free flour?

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Annette December 6, 2012 at 8:37 pm

This to a lot longer on the initial rise, but it was beautiful and tasted good too!

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jude December 7, 2012 at 6:06 pm

I am totally miffed by this recipe. i will never bake any other bread, ever! Coolest thing ever and i have been cooking professionally for 30 yrs.

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jude December 6, 2012 at 6:13 pm

I didn’t pay attention to the time given for the dough to sit. Can I go over the 12 to 18 hours?

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Emily December 6, 2012 at 7:33 pm

Hi, Jude – Yes, you can go over 18 hours and it shouldn’t be a problem, especially if your house is cooler. The dough is very forgiving. Someone left a comment pushing 24 hours and said the bread still turned out great. It might impact the flavor a bit. Let us know!

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jude December 7, 2012 at 4:56 am

Thanks!

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Chris Sheely December 6, 2012 at 12:06 pm

My house is really chilly-my kitchen rarely gets over 65. Would this affect the rising part? Let it rise longer? Sometimes it’s 60 at night. Would that be too cold for this bread to rise properly?

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Emily December 6, 2012 at 1:36 pm

Hi, Chris -
You should be fine! Just don’t get stuck on times too much. Pay attention to the signs that it has risen enough. You will probably be at the higher end of the rise time, 18+ hours. Let us know how it turns out!

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Jana December 4, 2012 at 9:33 pm

Can you share what changes you had to make when you doubled the recipe? Thanks!

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Emily December 4, 2012 at 10:46 pm

I just doubled the ingredients, decreased the baking temp, and increased the baking time. Check out Jim Lahey’s book, My Bread, for the original recipe (it’s all over the web, as well).

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JUNE LEE December 4, 2012 at 1:54 pm

can this be made without any salt or less salt?

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Emily December 4, 2012 at 2:32 pm

Sure! Check out the FAQ’s for some salt alternatives. Some have omitted it altogether and added herbs for flavor instead. Up to you!

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Lisa December 1, 2012 at 5:52 pm

I just made this bread (the wheat and molasses version) and it came out sooooo good. I did a different no knead recipe a few days ago that wasn’t as good. This loaf was so good-looking and delicious! I had been making loaf bread before having my 2nd child in Jan this year, and am finally getting back into it. Excited to experiment with smaller loaves and flavors. Thank you!

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Stacie @ No Idle Bread December 1, 2012 at 3:57 pm

This bread was easy to make. . .even in the midst of 4 children running around, a one hour errand that turned into 2, dogs barking, telephone ringing. . .you get the idea! What thrills me is that it is no fuss AND I don’t have to worry about keeping the dough warmer than room-temp. Now, I’m just waiting on it to cool so I can have that first slice! Thanks!

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Tary December 1, 2012 at 12:00 pm

It may be just a tad hyperbole to say this bread is life-altering….in a good way! I have to express my gratitude for sharing this wonderful recipe on your blog. I’ve tried making no-knead bread in the past and failed miserably those 3 times. Your picture of the risen, bubbly, darkened dough was invaluable.

But I do have one confession to make. I added one tbsp of sugar, and increased the years to 1 tsp (just because that’s what was left in the package!). The bread tastes just like my favorite bread from a local bakery. I feel like I just learned the best secret around!

So thanks again to you, and thanks to Pinterest for helping me find you!

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Kiwe December 1, 2012 at 6:19 am

Have you had any experience making this with Bob Red mills gluten free flour?? Wondering if I need to alter the recipe in any way!

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Emily December 1, 2012 at 9:38 am

Hi, Kiwe! I have looked and heard from a few people who have tried GF variations/flours. So far, no one has been thrilled with the results. I would love to hear if anyone has had success making this GF! Sorry I’m not much help in this department. Maybe I need to start experimenting? Let us know if the Bob’s works for you!

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Em December 1, 2012 at 6:01 am

Thanks a lot for your reply, Emily. I live in France so I’ll try to find the equivalent to your yeast. I can’t wait to try it out!

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Lyninnm November 30, 2012 at 5:19 pm

Emily, this bread is fabulous! There is something inherently wrong with the bread here and we have not had sandwiches since 1996, and I am not kidding you. It is either squishy wet or all dried out and hard. It also seems to have no salt. (Salt police, it’s too late for us, we’re fine, thank you very much). I have had grilled cheese and DH has had hot turkey sandwiches each day since I made this on Monday. See my comment to Zahra above. Also, I wiped my Dutch oven out with olive oil and it imparted a wonderful, subtle flavor. I will be making a half recipe twice a week and trying lots of combinations. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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Joanie November 30, 2012 at 4:32 pm

I made this about a month ago and couldn’t believe the big beautiful delicious loaf it made with really no work! I’ve been making bread from scratch for 35 years and it involves much work- needing, making sure the temp is just right so you don’t kill the yeast etc. This bread reminds me of the bread we had in France-yummy! Thanks so much for sharing your recipe. I have another batch stirred up to bring to my sister’s cousin reunion tomorrow and am excited to have them taste it with her soup. :)

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Amy Baijens November 30, 2012 at 4:08 am

Thanks for sharing this recipe, I’m definately going to try this!

I was just wondering; are the degrees in this recipe fahrenheit or celcius? My oven (I live in the Netherlands) displays the temperatures in celcius, but I have no idea if it’s the same for US ovens, and I don’t want to end up with a blackened or underdone loaf :p

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Gaille November 30, 2012 at 9:59 am

U.S. uses Farenheit as heat measurement…. try googling (or bing’ing) it (ie. farenheit conversion to celcius) to get your info.

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Gaille November 30, 2012 at 12:07 am

Does anyone have experience making small “boules” out of this recipe/method? I’m wanting some to hollow out and serve clam chowder in. Would I just cut the sticky dough into pieces, roll them in flour, then let raise as usual, and space a bit apart in parchment-lined dutch oven ? I’m thinking a ½ recipe should be perfect amount to make 4 boules. Hopefull they wouldn’t end up attached to each other, like sweet yeast rolls & need to tear apart….

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mercedes December 4, 2012 at 7:15 am

This recipe makes wonderful boules! I bake them separately in small 1 quart lidded pots. The small pot gives them the right size for to serve soup in them.

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April November 29, 2012 at 8:09 pm

I have a 5 quart one but it’s not cast iron.

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April November 29, 2012 at 8:01 pm

can I cut this recipe in half? My dutch oven is only 3
1/2 quarts.

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Gaille November 29, 2012 at 11:54 pm

Yes, ½ recipe works just fine. I only do ½ on purpose, as there’s only 2 of us to eat the bread & don’t want it to spoil – we usually eat up the smaller loaf in 4 days. If not, I put in ziploc in fridge. By the way, I use my 6 qt. dutch oven for the ½ recipe – doesn’t affect the outcome at all :-) Also, makes sense to do just ½ recipe when I’m experimenting w/ addition of “extra” (herbs, cheese, nuts, different flour, etc.) Have fun & enjoy!

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Amber Wardell November 29, 2012 at 3:57 pm

can’t wait to try this!

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Mandy November 29, 2012 at 3:09 pm

Do I need to spray the dutch oven with pam to prevent the bread from sticking?

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Gaille November 29, 2012 at 5:15 pm

I just keep the same piece of parchment paper under it that dough rises on for those last 2 hrs. This also makes it so easy to pull the loaf out of pot after baking – just hold onto the corners & pull out of blasting hot pot!

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Lyninnm November 30, 2012 at 5:26 pm

Mandy, I didn’t use parchment paper, but I wiped the Dutch oven out really well with olive oil and the bread came out great. The oven temp is high enough so that the loaf just popped right out. Good Luck, This is really easy once you get going!

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Carole November 29, 2012 at 8:08 am

I have my first batch of no-knead bread rising on the counter. When I heard about this I found this website, the original Mark Bittman article and follow up and the Rose Berenbaum website where it was discussed. Mark Bittman said to use 430 grams of flour and Rose Berenbaum said to use 468 grams of flour so I got out my kitchen scale. To my surprise, my 3 cups of flour weighed about 360 grams! So I might not be measuring it the same way they do. If your dough is really wet you might try weighing your flour to see if it is about what Mark Bittman recommends.

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Liza November 28, 2012 at 6:48 pm

Hi!
I in high school (but an experienced baker- I plan to open my own someday) and made this for a school project. It was so easy I actually thought I was doing something wrong as I have never made yeast bread before, but it seems this bread is pretty foolproof. It turned out great despite the longer rise time it had while I was at school/ afternoon activities and I am waiting for it to cool so I can try it! It smells delicious!!! I was wondering if you think it would work to bake in muffin tins as dinner rolls? I know it would eliminate the lid option so maybe make it softer? Just wondering what you thought! thanks for the great recipe!

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HeyCupcake December 19, 2012 at 9:26 pm

This deserves a reply IMO

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Kate December 19, 2012 at 9:45 pm

Emily might have just missed it. There are over 600 comments on this post. I’m sure she’ll reply when she gets the chance.

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Crystal November 28, 2012 at 10:24 am

hey when you say subsitute wheat flour for 3 cups of the other do you mean in place of. Like 3 wheat and 3 white or just 3 whole wheat for the entire loaf. Cuz everytime I use whole wheat flour in a white recipe it is way off.

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Emily November 28, 2012 at 11:35 am

Hi, Crystal! You would substitute 3 cups of whole wheat flour for 3 cups of white flour, keeping a total of 6 cups of flour (3 wheat, 3 white). You may need to add a bit more water, depending on your altitude, humidity, and/or house temp. Hope that helps!

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Crystal November 28, 2012 at 11:54 am

Thanks so much can’t wait!

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Em November 28, 2012 at 6:04 am

Hi everyone,
I’ve never made my own bread and I’m tempted by this recipe! Could anyone help me out with the active-dry yeast, please? What does it look like? some sort of powder? Do you just mix it as is to the flour, or do you have to “prepare” it some way (I read somewhere you have to mix it with warm water first…)
Does liquid yeast work as well for this recipe?
Sorry for these silly questions, but I’d like to do things well! :)
Thanks a lot for your help!

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Emily November 28, 2012 at 11:43 am

Hi, Em! Don’t worry, these are great questions. Making bread can be intimidating, especially if you are new to the game. This recipe is a good place to start.

Lahey’s original recipe calls for instant or other active dry yeast. You can buy this in packets in the baking section. I buy my yeast at Costco for the best price, but it’s a lot of yeast. Dry yeast looks like tiny tan-colored granules, slightly larger than salt or sugar.

Just follow the recipe, mixing the yeast in with the flour and salt, then adding the water. Because of the long, slow rise, you do not need to proof (mix it with warm water and often sugar) it first. I’ve never tried liquid yeast. I’d stick with dry yeast, then once you are comfortable with the steps, experiment away!

Go for it! I can’t wait to hear how it turns out.

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Gaille November 27, 2012 at 9:18 pm

No, have never tried using a true sourdough starter. But if made according to directions, it ends up w/ a bit of sour taste anyway.

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Beth November 27, 2012 at 7:58 pm

Has anybody tried a sourdough version of this?

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Gaille November 27, 2012 at 9:19 pm

No, have never tried using a true sourdough starter. But if made according to directions, it ends up w/ a bit of sour taste anyway.

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Laura, SW Pdx November 27, 2012 at 6:26 pm

I’m so excited! I made the bread and it turned out perfectly! It’s gorgeous! Thank you. Now I have something homemade to impress company! What else do you have for us Emily? I would love to try another recipe that is as successful as this one! A real winner. Thank you!

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Nicole November 27, 2012 at 8:15 am

I have a stainless steel pot that would be perfect to use but wondered if anyone experience sticking of the bread after baking in anything other than a dutch oven. Should I grease it before baking or would it be ok to just bake it as directed?

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Morgan November 27, 2012 at 8:44 am

Hi Nicole,
I use a stainless steel casserole pot with lid – I bought it especially as it’s hard to find dutch ovens in the UK! It’s been an odd experience. The first 2 or 3 times I made the bread it popped out perfectly, however from then on the bread started sticking and I’d have to spend ages digging it out of the pot, leaving most of the sides and bottom behind. Now I do the second rise on a sheet of parchment and lift the parchment and dough straight into the pot then cook it with the parchment in there. It pops straight out now with no problem at all.

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Samantha November 26, 2012 at 6:02 pm

This was probably the best, tastiest and most beautiful loaf of bread I’ve ever made. It may take a long time to rise, but it was so easy to make and was well worth the wait! Thank you!

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Zahra November 24, 2012 at 1:42 pm

By the way, I did not use a towel. After letting the dough sit in a bowl for 18 hours, I just floured a plate and put the dough in it, let it rise for another 2 hours (covered it with a regular towel). when it was time for baking I put the dutch oven on the plate and flipped the plate so the dough got transferred to the pot. no mess and no extra flour required.

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Jennifer November 29, 2012 at 9:16 am

How long and at what temp do you bake it?

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Ellen November 29, 2012 at 10:50 pm

Zahra, I made this Monday your way. No mess. Thank you so much. I really think that whole step can be omitted.

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Lyninnm November 30, 2012 at 4:58 pm

Zahra, I also skipped the towel and flour part. Thank you, I was considering it, but your post gave me the confidence to go ahead. The bread was outstanding and I am going to try multi grain next. BTW, I am at altitude and baked at the temp called for, but used convection. It came great. The dough wasn’t hard to handle at all and I measured very carefully. Maybe because its so dry here in NM? Also, I made it Monday, kept it in the Dutch oven, and it’s still fine today. Thanks again!

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Zahra November 24, 2012 at 1:36 pm

*****
I love baking and I found this recipe on pinterest. I have to say that this is by far one of the best breads I have ever made. Next time I am going to add some rosemary and olive oil and see if I can make a rosemary bread. I love love love the crust as well as the chewiness of the bread itself. this is a keeper. Thanks for sharing.

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Lynn November 24, 2012 at 1:42 pm

I use rosemary and sunflower seeds. Gives a hearty taste to the bread. I made this for Thanksgiving, and made cranberry butter to go on it. Way good! Also try tomato paste (3-4 T), parmesan cheese and basil. Makes an awesome grilled cheese and the tomato soup is already in the bread. Really good with all kinds of herbs. Pasta sprinkle works good, too.

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Christie {Pepper Lynn} November 23, 2012 at 9:42 pm

Hi Emily! First of all, this bread looks delicious. :) Can you help me understand what the advantage is of using the dutch oven instead of a baking stone? I’ve been using the Artisan in Five method for a few years now (and love it!), so I’m intrigued by your comment that you prefer the Lahey method over that one. Does cooking it in the dutch oven have to do with trapping moisture, perhaps an alternative to baking on a stone and adding hot water to a separate pan? Thanks so much!

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Emily November 24, 2012 at 1:13 pm

Hi, Christie! I prefer this method because it’s less work for a superior loaf of bread.

The Dutch oven acts like an “oven within an oven.” The moisture released from the dough creates steam inside the Dutch oven, giving you that rustic-quality crispy exterior and chewy interior. A baking stone is awesome for many things, but to get similar results with bread you have to spray water on the dough or put that extra pan of water in the oven. More labor intensive and you won’t get the same crust and crumb as with a Dutch oven. Hope that helps!

If you are interested in trying it, December is a great time of year to look for Dutch oven deals!

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Christie {Pepper Lynn} November 26, 2012 at 12:03 am

Thank you for filling the details, Emily. I actually own a dutch oven already, so I think I’ll give this recipe a try soon. Thanks!

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Carla M November 22, 2012 at 9:18 pm

Is this bread only good for munching or would it be good for sandwiches also?

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Kate November 22, 2012 at 9:22 pm

If you cut it thin enough then it would be great for sandwiches.

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Sue November 21, 2012 at 9:45 am

This is on my counter as of this writing. I’ve ALWAYS been afraid of working with yeast but giving this a whirl … it looks so tasty and I love crusty bread! Anxious to taste!

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Micha November 21, 2012 at 8:37 am

I made this for the first time, also my first time ever to bake bread. I changed the recipe to whole wheat flour and substituted one cup for one cup of seeds ( sunflower, pumpkin and flax) I don’t have a Dutch oven so I used a ceramic baker with a lid and it came out fantastic. I will never buy bread again.

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Gaille November 21, 2012 at 12:37 am

Groaning…… am eating way too much of this delicious bread! Because it’s just me & don’t want bread to mold, am making smaller loaf, using 3 cups flour, 1½ cup h2o, ½ tsp yeast & 1 tsp salt, letting it sit for 18-20 hrs. Love, love, L.O.V.E. this bread. Have to make myself wait a week before making more! Keep it in ziploc w/ piece of dry paper towel over the cut edge. Oh, yah, awesome toast!!!

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Julie November 20, 2012 at 1:03 pm

AMAZING! Thank you! My first un-cake-like bread ever turned out great! Made the wheat, it’s really 1/2 wheat since there is still 3c white flour, needed to add more liquid after mixing it. I also let it rise longer, about 22 hours, because it hadn’t risen much at 15 hours then I had to go out! lol It all worked out ok though…came out perfectly.

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Lynette November 18, 2012 at 5:38 pm

I used to make this a lot so I thought I’d throw out a couple of tips that worked for me. One is to use King Arthur bread flour. It gives such a nice texture and elasticity. It costs significantly more but when you break it down it’s still not that much for a loaf of bread and it’s so darn rewarding!
The other thing is for those with no dutch oven or similar pot. I used a cast iron skillet for the bottom and inverted a mixing bowl over it to create the dutch oven-style environment. Worked great!

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Cakeymonster November 21, 2012 at 8:45 am

@Lynette-thanks for the advice. My dough is already rising and I was trying to figure out the best way to cook it without a Dutch oven. I just went thru my whole pot cabinet and found a cast iron skillet but it has no cover. Then I read your comment and problem solved! Happy thanksgiving!

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Don November 17, 2012 at 3:59 pm

Can you freeze these loaves?

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Emily November 18, 2012 at 5:05 pm

Hi, Don! Yes, you can. Wrap well in foil, then a large plastic bag. Reheat in foil in a hot oven.

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Jennika November 17, 2012 at 7:38 am

I used to beak bread with my grandfather growing up, and I remember what an onerous and time-conusuming process it all was. No wonder we only did it twice a year!

I found this recipe about a month ago and have made 5 loaves so far and have three planned for Thanksgiving! The process is so simple, and the results are amazing! I’ve even staret experimenting with new flavors (though we are Huge fans of the plain whole wheat). My favorite so far is lemon (zest), rosemary, and garlic.

Thank you so much for the detailed instruction and for turning me onto what my husband calls his favorite hobby of mine!

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Bruce November 16, 2012 at 8:55 pm

Tried this for the first time. Initial dough ball seemed dry, so I added water by the tablespoon until it felt “sticky.” (It took 2 tbs) Otherwise, I followed the recipe to the letter. The floured dough did not stick to my dutch oven, and the finished loaf rolled out easily.
Loaf had a good hard crust and a chewy center. Just what you would expect in a rustic bread!

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Greg November 15, 2012 at 9:06 pm

To make it look even better, you need to score the dough just before closing the lid of the dutch oven (just don’t burn your hand!)
If you don’t have a rasor blade, take a very sharp knife, tip the blade in water (to prevent it from sticking to the dough) and give energic and quick slash to your dough.
This way it will be easier for the dough to raise while baking, and the inside will be lighter.

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CAROL GANDOLFI November 15, 2012 at 7:21 pm

JUST MADE THE NO KNEAD BREAD AND IT IS BEAUTIFUL W/ THE PERFECT CRUNCHY CHEWY CRUST OERFECT SOFT TEXTURE INSIDE I USED THE PAMPERED CHEF STONEWARE CASSEROLE AND IT WORKED BEAUTIFULLY AS SOON AS I TOOK IT OUT OF THE OVEN AND SAW THE RESULTS I STARTED ANOTHER ONE GREAT RECIPE THANK YOU I FEEL LIKE A BAKER!

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Mikki November 15, 2012 at 6:21 pm

I made this and it was soooo good. As to the issue with wet or dry. Mine has turned out a little dry in the initial mixture and I just added a little water at a time until it was the right consistency. I have had trouble with sticky dough after the second rising as well but i just scraped it off and it turned out just fine. The second time i made it I added garlic and onion with cracked black pepper and it is heavenly.

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Billie November 15, 2012 at 11:56 am

@Karen Hall… I have the same winter issue, I sit the bowl on a heating pad on low. Works great!

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Colleen K. Peltomaa November 15, 2012 at 10:35 am

I am going to see how this recipe works out using Einkorn flour from the Jovial people.

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clarissa November 15, 2012 at 9:16 am

Just wanted to say thank you! I’ve never made bread before,It was soo easy. always wanted a dutch oven, so I bought the blue one & made my dough….it was super sticky after letting it rise, no matter how much flour I kept adding…decided to scrape it into the dutch oven…. I was worried, but out came the best bread ever!!! I was so happy. Thanks again…

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Karen Hall November 15, 2012 at 7:39 am

Looks great and we have already gotten new yeast and bread flour. Haven’t made bread in a long time.
I am concerned about the rising on the counter and how the room temperature affects that. The typical temperature in my kitchen all winter runs from a high of about 65 down to as low as 55 overnight. My stove does not have a pilot light which might have helped. Any suggestions on this?

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Emily November 15, 2012 at 3:13 pm

Hi, Karen! My house runs about the same temps. I’d focus more on the signs your dough is ready (I tried to include as many of these details in the post as I could) than the exact times. Your dough will probably need the longer rise time because of the cooler house, more on the 18 hr. end.

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Linda November 14, 2012 at 8:53 pm

Hey Lynn -
Re: your dry mixture… Are you sure you used 2 2/3 cups of water to the 6 cups of flour? If you used 2/3 cup water that would def leave the mixture too dry. Can’t wait to try this recipe. =)

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Denise November 22, 2012 at 9:19 am

I use a little bit more water.. about 1/3 more to make it a little more sticky. It will be very sticky but works great if you flour your hands and the countertop well. I make this all the time!

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lynn November 14, 2012 at 8:21 pm

I just ran to the kitchen to make this and it’s still sitting there, can’t even mix it together it’s soooo dry…. are you sure it’s 6 cups of flour? Nothing sticky about it, will have to double up on the rest of ingred…. maybe it’s supposed to be 3 c. of flour?

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emmetts November 14, 2012 at 5:26 pm

So so glad I found this recipe again. I made it last year and it was beautiful and yummy!!!!

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Jessica November 12, 2012 at 10:51 pm

So I have not seen any responses to the gf questions? Is there a blend that you can use to make it gf? Would love to try it, I miss bread soooo much : (

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kerry November 12, 2012 at 10:39 pm

I’ve tried other bread recipes but this was the easiest and BEST one I’ve tried so far! I made it as is (scooped the flour, wasn’t being too precise) and the dough was sticky but I just went with it and it worked fine. I floured the final resting bowl and the dough popped right out into the dutch oven. Hubby LOVES the bread, I can’t wait to try the whole grain and start doing add-ins. THANK YOU!

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kerry November 12, 2012 at 10:41 pm

BTW, I wonder if oiling the first bowl will help the stickiness, or does that change the consistency of the dough, thus the final result?

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Lynda November 12, 2012 at 9:20 am

I can only find fresh yeast here in Spain. Will that work. Google says to use 5 gms to 1 tsp dry. Has anyone tried using fresh yeast? Anything special I should be doing? Can´t wait to try it in a minute…

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Chelsea November 11, 2012 at 9:17 pm

I don’t have a large pot with a lid, could I use a slow cooker?

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SapphireMoon November 18, 2012 at 3:12 pm

I made my first batch using the ceramic shell in the oven and it worked for me.

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Jen November 11, 2012 at 3:08 pm

The most perfect round loaf of bread! It is the easiest bread I have ever made and I thank you for the wonderful recipe.

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Tuti November 11, 2012 at 6:04 am

My dough was very wet and sticky. I added at least another 1cup of flour to just be able to handle or fold the bread. What am i doing wrong? It is resting right now and I haven’t baked it yet, but did I add too much flour? Help!

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Emily November 11, 2012 at 4:03 pm

Hi, Tuti!

The wetness of the dough will depend on the temperature/humidity of your kitchen. It will be slightly different for everyone. I recommend following the recipe as written the first time, then making changes as you get more familiar with the process. However, if your dough is too wet to handle, just add 1-2 T. of flour at a time until you can quickly form it into a rough ball. It should still be a wet, slightly sticky dough. I bet your bread will turn out just fine! It is incredibly forgiving.

Hope that helps! If you have more questions, check out the FAQ page. Happy baking!

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Ali_R November 11, 2012 at 5:50 pm

It could also be how everyone’s measuring their flour. If the recipe, as written, is assuming a scooped out measuring cup and the next person uses a sift to measure, they’re going to be light on flour. At KAF they say you get 1/8 c more per scooped cup over a sifted cup. (Obviously humidity is a big difference, too- when I was living in Mexico I didn’t need to add water to my pasta recipe it was that drippy wet!!! )

Just out of curiosity, do you scoop or sift to measure?

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Emily November 11, 2012 at 9:07 pm

Good point, Ali_R! That would make a difference. I scoop the flour with one measuring cup, dump it into the other, and level with a knife. And my husband always gives me a hard time for being so precise. :)

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Amie November 24, 2012 at 12:45 pm

That’s funny, that’s how I measured and mine was too dry. I added a little more water to make it sticky. I live in Virginia Beach.

erin November 10, 2012 at 12:22 pm

SOMEONE HELP! I do not have a dutch oven – or anything other than a metal cooking pan with a lid…… is there anything else I can cook it on? i have posted before and got no feedback. Could I cook it in a bread pan? metal or glass??

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Stephanie November 10, 2012 at 1:23 pm

My friend made this in a stainless steel pan with a lid and said it turned out as good as in the dutch oven. The only thing you need to be careful with is that the knobs and handles are heat proof at this temperature. Enjoy! This is the best bread I’ve ever made, so versatile and everyone loves it!

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Morgan November 10, 2012 at 3:39 pm

I’ve been making it in a stainless steel casserole with a glass lid and it works out perfectly. I cover the handles and lid knob with kitchen foil to ensure they’re safe at such a high temp but the cooking container itself is fine. Go for it!

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SapphireMoon November 18, 2012 at 3:10 pm

While perusing a thrift store in search of something to bake in for this particular recipe, I came upon a naked crock pot ceramic shell. I bought it and it produced a great bread. So those with crock pots might want to give it a try. Cheers.

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betsy November 6, 2012 at 3:32 pm

hi, im definitely planning on making this. but im wondering if you think it would work the same if i added in roasted garlic cloves, kalamata olives, or other savory add-ins? anyone tried yet?
thanks and happy baking!

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Lynn November 6, 2012 at 4:02 pm

I add rosemary and sunflower seeds; parmesan cheese and 2 T tomatoes paste with basil, ( makes great grilled cheese sandwichees) or garlic and onions. The imagination is your only limit!

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Gaille November 20, 2012 at 11:34 pm

Did you add the extras at the very beginning? or carefully folded into dough just before baking? Has anyone else added extras? I’m wanting to do orange zest (maybe sub some marmalade for H20), dried cranberries, & pecan for Thanksgiving.

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Jennika November 21, 2012 at 8:50 am

Gaille,

I always add to the dry ingredients before adding the water to make the dough. Comes out perfect!

P.S. Jalapeno and Asiago was a big hit at our pre-Thanksgiving Thanksgiving on Sunday!

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Gaille November 27, 2012 at 9:32 pm

I’m SO excited!! This time of year, think of putting cranberries, oranges and walnuts together… have a quick bread and have done waffles with those flavors. How, I wondered, would this no-knead bread taste? Well, am pleased to report it’s fantabulous!!! 1st off, all extras were mixed in w/ yeast and flour at very beginning. I replaced 3/4 cup of water w/ 3/4 cup “melted” marmalade (fine cut). The marmalade was too warm, so the 3/4 cup water was quite cold from the tap, which brought liquid to room temp. Also added 1 cup chopped walnuts and 1/2 cup dried cranberries. The resulting loaf is chock-full of flavor, but not really sweet – in other words, not like a dessert :) Yes, was concerned about the sugar in marmalade changing outcome, but rising time & rising level of dough were the same. Only thing is the sugar causes crust to brown more rapidly, so be sure and do not bake longer than directed (1/2 hr covered, 15min. uncovered). So far have only tried w/ butter, but will get some cream cheese tomorrow & try that. This is un-sweet enough to be included w/ savory meal as the only bread. My next trial will be with rosemary & roasted garlic.

Heather November 27, 2012 at 9:44 pm

For Thanksgiving this year, I made this recipe, but I added two bunches of rosemary and 1 1/2 heads of garlic in with the flour and yeast. I didn’t pre-roast the garlic and the recipe turned out amazing. It’s been requested for all future family gatherings in place of regular dinner rolls!

Dani November 6, 2012 at 9:45 am

I am very new to baking. I do not have a Dutch Oven, but I do have a very large cast iron pan with a secure lid. Will this work?

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Emily November 6, 2012 at 3:35 pm

Hi, Dani! Any 4-6 qt. heavy-duty lidded pot that is rated for such high heat will work.

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Liza November 5, 2012 at 7:48 am

What about freezing any leftovers?

And any thoughts on the calorie count?

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Genevieve Haag November 4, 2012 at 5:20 pm

I’m so excited to try this bread! I just finished mixing it and have it sitting to rise, but, I just realized I won’t be able to touch it again for more like 21 hours.. will this be a problem?
Thanks for the recipe!!

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Liza November 5, 2012 at 7:52 am

I let mine sit for about that long and it was fine – though I didn’t see the bubbles that are shown in the above picture but i went ahead and it turned out great.

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Stephanie November 4, 2012 at 3:54 pm

It worked!! Even in high altitude Colorado!! Thank you so much for the inspiration!

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Emily November 2, 2012 at 7:23 pm

I have made bread before, but never so easily or with such delicious results! WOW! I think a Dutch oven with this recipe would be one of the best house-warming, birthday, wedding, holiday, etc. gift ever!

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Alexia Higbee November 2, 2012 at 7:03 pm

I started the dough last night and finished it today. I have only mad bread once before years ago and it was not so good. This bread was so easy and is just amazingly good! Love the crunchy crust! I will make this again and again!

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Meagan Guidry November 2, 2012 at 2:23 pm

Oh my gosh, I made this today and it was delicious! I’d never baked bread before and I’m not much of a baker in general, but this was delicious. Nothing better than warm, homemade bread! My dough was really sticky the entire time but it still came out wonderfully.

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Ivy November 1, 2012 at 7:59 pm

While camping, if you like to cook and bake outside in a dutch oven with coals, this recipe works fine, just be sure to preheat the dutch oven. If it is very cold, you may need to help the bread rise, by putting 2 or 3 coals on the dutch oven while it is rising.

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Another Emily November 1, 2012 at 3:06 pm

I hope you got permission from Mr. Lahey and his publisher to use his recipe on your website.

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l November 1, 2012 at 7:41 pm

Another Emily – Get a grip and enjoy the recipe…

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Kate November 1, 2012 at 8:52 pm

The recipe has been adapted from his and you are allowed to use a recipe as long as you give credit to the original source.

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Mark Z November 1, 2012 at 2:17 pm

I`ve made bread the old way and sometimes when it`s not as warm out as i like i have turned the oven on low 125 and let it warm up then shut it off , then put my dough in just like you would on the counter. and it takes half the time to rise. i don’t know if it would make a difference with this recipe.

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Kelli November 1, 2012 at 4:37 am

Hello,
I just wanted to say thank you so much for posting this. I have wanted to make this exact bread for a long time however haven’t been able to find one as EASY

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Kelli November 1, 2012 at 4:39 am

as this one (sorry I hit the wrong key). My daughter (3yr) helped me and I love getting her involved when I can. Thanks again.

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Deb October 31, 2012 at 10:57 pm

My cousin is severely gluten allergic. She has posted experiments in cooking, with her hubby as test subject. She’s in the UK but I’ve seen her ingredients on amazon, though I’ve not tried any. Look here: http://blissglutenfree.blogspot.com/

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Holly October 31, 2012 at 4:30 pm

I made this bread tonight and it turned out awesome!!! I actually made two batches, the first one I followed the recipe exactly. With this batch I thought that it would be too dry, but left it as the recipe instructs. The second batch I added 2/3 of a cup to the dough to see if it would make a difference. Both turned out amazing! The second batch came out a little lighter in texture and colour. So happy I tried this recipe!!

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Amy October 30, 2012 at 4:11 pm

This bread is delicious and so easy to make. Can this bread be frozen?

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Jessica Booth October 29, 2012 at 5:14 pm

Hi there,
Found you via Pinterest. Just letting you know I posted a picture of bread made using your recipe on Facebook, and on the CA Olive Ranch olive oil page – and it’s caused a ruckus! Everyone wanted the recipe, so I’ve pointed them here. Thanks for sharing this awesome bread!! My wallet, my pregnant belly, and my family thanks you! :) https://www.facebook.com/CaliforniaOliveRanch?fref=ts

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Angela November 1, 2012 at 8:37 pm

Wow! Thanks for the link love, Jessica!

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Beth M October 29, 2012 at 11:12 am

I’ve made this twice in the past three weeks. My dough is really gooey and hard to handle. No matter how much flour I put on the towel, after two hours of resting it sticks. Badly. The second time, I lined the towel with parchment heavily dusted with flour. Stick city. I’ve been baking bread for 30 years and never run into this problem. There has to be a better way. Suggestions?

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Melissa October 29, 2012 at 6:53 pm

My dough is really sticky too :( I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. Its sticky after the 12-18 hrs and after the rising in the towel. Any suggestions out there? Does anyone ever use more yeast, use warm water or proof the yeast?

Thanks

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Emily October 29, 2012 at 7:57 pm

Hi, Beth M & Melissa – That’s strange that it’s giving you trouble. Don’t give up!! :)
If your dough is super sticky, feel free to add 1 T. of flour at a time to the dough. It is supposed to be a wet dough, but you should be able to handle it and form it into a rough ball on the floured towel. I am now using a square of parchment paper on the towel. I still dust the parchment paper with enough flour that the dough doesn’t stick. Even if it does stick, just flip it into the pot and scrape the sticky dough on top. It might look strange going into the oven, but it should still bake up nicely. Hope that helps!

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jennifer November 6, 2012 at 2:48 pm

Mine is sticky as well but it comes out tasting great. I’ll try adding more four to see if that helps. I wonder if it’s living in the damp pacific nw?

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Lee November 8, 2012 at 3:52 pm

Bread dough reflects the amount of moisture in the flour you’re using; if your dough is sticky, use more flour–a little at a time–until it feels (or looks) like the photos posted. If your area is very humid, you’ll need more flour than where relative humidity is looooooooooooooooow.

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Nancy October 29, 2012 at 8:21 am

I substituted 1 cup sour dough starter for: 1 cup bread flour, the yeast, and ~1/2 cup water. It worked really, really well. Thanks for this great recipe.

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Laura, SW Pdx November 27, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Nancy, or anyone out there… I do want to try this as sour dough. I’ve never made bread (until this recipe) so I’m scared to try sour dough. No yeast is used with sour dough starter? Sounds like I just buy that and make a few adjustments and I’ll have sour dough? Yum!

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Pat October 28, 2012 at 7:03 am

Should the Dutch oven be oiled? I make other bread in my Dutch oven, and I always oil it. Thanks!

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Emily October 29, 2012 at 3:02 pm

Hi, Pat! Because of the high heat, it doesn’t need to be oiled, but I don’t think it would make a big difference if you want to do it.

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Candy October 27, 2012 at 12:25 pm

Are there any special high altitude directions? I live in Colorado Springs so our elevation is about 6500 ft.

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Lynn October 27, 2012 at 1:07 pm

Nope, I am right there with ya and I didn’t change basic recipe for the altitude. Works great.

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Courtney October 26, 2012 at 7:10 am

Hi Lisa,

I am a professional baker and what you are experiencing is the gluten in the bread. By letting this rise for over 12 hours, it is letting the gluten develop on its own, hence not needing and kneading. What you are perceiving as rubbery is actually just the texture of the proteins in gluten when fully developed.

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erykah October 26, 2012 at 4:46 pm

Courtney:

Can u recommend a flour that I may be able to use for this? Because of allergies, I cannot even use glueten free flour so I’ve been using coconut flour, tapioca flour, or garbanzo bean flour. I havent made the bread yet, but im wondering will it rise just the same or even at alk

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Lisa October 25, 2012 at 8:02 pm

I just made this for the first time and I have never made bread before. It was very good but the texture seemed a little rubbery. I let it cool almost completely, so what do you think happened. Is this the was it is suppose to be? Or did I do something wrong? I did exactly what the recipe said and then I let it rise for 13 hours. Then folded it under, wrapped it and let it sit for another 1 1/2 hrs then baked it on 430 for 50 min plus 10 uncovered.

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Anna October 25, 2012 at 1:58 pm

Hi there! Love love love this recipe and am excited to try it tonight. A question— will it get beautifully golden all by itself, with no egg-wash required? I’m had breads bake really well in the past but just not get golden (sort of stayed a pasty death-white. haha) Help! :)

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Emily October 26, 2012 at 1:37 pm

Hi, Anna – There are no hidden steps or trick photography here, I promise! :) I make my bread exactly as written and it turns out exactly as photographed. Leave a comment and let us know how it goes!

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Greg November 15, 2012 at 8:59 pm

It stayed white because you baked it outside of a dutch oven. Try the dutch oven, it’s the secret to great looking home baked bread.

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Kristen C. October 24, 2012 at 9:44 am

Oh my God! I did it! It’s sitting on my counter crackling right now. It’s beautiful! Besides my kids, it’s the prettiest thing I’ve ever made! First time making bread, followed the directions to a T, when i pulled it out of the oven and stuck in my thermometer–DING! 200 Degrees! It’s like everything is right in the world… I will try not to eat it until dinner tonight, with pasta, wherein my family will gaze upon me adoringly and say, “Mom, you’re the best!” Thanks for the recipe. Apparently, I am now a bread-baker. :-)

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Stephanie October 22, 2012 at 4:52 pm

Well, it’s four weeks now since I first made this bread – see my comment September 26th. I loved it then, now I just adore this recipe and how versatile it is! We had guests for dinner and they ate it all!! I’ve used it for pizza. I’ve added raisins and spices for fruit bread. I’ve added sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts. Every bread is delicious. The bread lasts a few days and is still fresh to the last slice – it might last longer but not in our house! It toasts well and last night my husband made french toast. I can’t recommend your recipe enough and have shared it with quite a few people. How can I say thank you enough? Thank you thank you thank you :)

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Carla M December 16, 2012 at 8:58 pm

How did you use it for pizza?

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Mary Christie October 20, 2012 at 11:17 am

I made this bread overnight – next time, I’ll start at night and finish in the daytime! :-) I made it exactly as the recipe called for. Had to get my husband to help me mix it to the wet dough because of my arthritis, and he got it mixed really well. It did not stick to the towel – I made a big old mess with the flour! It is huge, popped right out of our Dutch Oven (Lodge cast iron). It went perfectly, even though it was a little cool in the house (upper 60s). We managed to let it cool before slicing. It is absolutely delicious – we love the chewy texture, and the crust is wonderfully crunchy. It’s now wrapped in a towel on the counter, and it’s about all I can do to stay out of the kitchen! Thanks, and I’m passing this on!

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Tuende October 19, 2012 at 3:07 pm

I made this twice now and it tastes amazing!!! However both times I had a problem with it sticking to my dutch oven… but I have to admit I overread the part about preheating the duch oven with the oven and I think I added too much water this last time.
How AMAZING though!!! I will bake my own breads from now on!!!
THANK YOU

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Morgan Holden-White October 19, 2012 at 3:04 am

Thank you so much for this post. I’m very excited to try it. However, being in the UK, I’m struggling to find a pot big enough, which can be heated above 180deg! It’s virtually impossible to find a Dutch oven and those I have found are ridiculously expensive. So I was thinking about halving the recipe but have no idea how long it would need to bake for. Any thoughts would be very very welcome! Thanks.

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Emily October 20, 2012 at 9:35 am

Sure, just cut the amounts in half, follow the directions as written, and bake at 425 for 30 min. covered and 10-20 min. uncovered (until internal temp of 200 and golden brown crust). Hope you are successful in tracking down a pot that will work!

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Morgan Holden-White October 20, 2012 at 11:14 am

Emily, thanks so much for your swift reply. Apologies though, I just saw you answered a similar question on 6th October but there are so many comments that I hadn’t read them all! Anyway, that’s very helpful and I’m going to attempt it with a Pyrex dish and lid, I think, or I may zip to TK Maxx to try and get a cheap casserole now I know I can get a smaller one. Anyhoo, very excited to try it!

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Morgan November 19, 2012 at 6:25 am

Hi Emily,

The bread making has been going extremely well, thanks so much for your post and tips. I purchased a stainless steel casserole and have since tried a half batch, full batch and 3/4 batch! The 3/4 recipe seems to work best for me in my casserole. Unfortunately I’ve hit a snag the last 3 times I’ve made the bread. I think it’s something to do with the casserole. The bread has stuck solidly to the dish at the bottom and sometimes on the sides too. It didn’t happen the first few times I made the bread so I’m wondering if it’s something that’s changed since washing the dish several times. Is there anything I can do to stop the sticking without compromising the makeup of the bread? Can I spray with oil? Line with parchment? What would you recommend. It’s so depressing as the bread turns out wonderfully but I have to stab, jab and poke the sides and bottom to get it out and generally the bottom crust is left stuck to the pan. *sigh* Help!

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Emily November 19, 2012 at 10:25 am

Hi, Morgan —
That is frustrating. I’ve had it happen a couple times so I totally get it. I’m wondering if it’s your pot, though, since it’s happening so often?

Here are my suggestions:
1) Make sure you are preheating the pot for the full 30+ minutes.
2) Lightly oil the pot or do the 2nd rise on a square of parchment paper and, instead of flipping the dough into the pot, just lift and place the dough in with the parchment paper on the bottom.

Hope this helps!

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Morgan November 20, 2012 at 12:03 pm

It must be the pot, can’t think why else it would suddenly be doing it when nothing else has changed. I had been heating the pot for at least 30 mins until this last time when I tried putting it in cold to see if that would make a difference (it did, actually stuck slightly less!) Thanks for the suggestions. I already do the second rise on parchment so will just place the dough and parchment in the pot together and see how that goes. I do have to say that my dough looks nothing like yours though! Yours is nice and…er…handle-able! Mine is soooo sticky that I have to peel it out of the bowl, peel it off my hands and onto the parchment. I can’t even mould it or turn it over or anything. I’m lucky if I can pass it from one hand to the other a couple of times. It doesn’t sit nicely in a ball ready to rise, it just is a gelatinous pile of gloop. And when putting into the pot it just hangs off the parchment until I painstakingly peel it off! And yet it still turns out wonderfully and tasty! It’s pretty much a foolproof, failure-proof recipe! All the comments are testament to how fabulous it is. So I just want to say a huge thank you for posting and for taking the time to respond to posts.

debbie October 17, 2012 at 8:11 pm

Ok, so…yeast scares me, never made bread but thought I’d give this a go. Forgot to mix dry ingredients before adding water. Due to family tragedy, dough sat out for 24 hours. By the time I got around to baking it I was so tired that I only let it rest for 11/4 hours. Only had pyrex to bake it in and only had oven to 425. All that and it still came out great. Cooling on rack now. 1 plain, 1 cinnamon raisin. Smells great, can’t wait to try. Apparently, you can not kill this bread!

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Emily October 17, 2012 at 8:40 pm

Ha! Your comment made me laugh out loud. Good to know that this bread can take a beating and still work.

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marina October 17, 2012 at 1:46 pm

Do you need to oil or spray the dutch oven?

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Emily October 17, 2012 at 2:34 pm

Nope! Just preheat the pot in the oven as written. It will create a crust on the bread, and the loaf should pop right out when finished baking.

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Julie October 17, 2012 at 12:18 pm

How much should the dough have risen after 12 hours? My grandma baked THE best bread, and I’ve always been afraid to try bread, because I knew it could never compare (just like Das’s fried chicken and potato salad). So I really want this to work, just so
I know that I CAN make bread, even if it’s not the same as Grandma’s.

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Emily October 17, 2012 at 2:15 pm

It’ll depend on how warm your room is. I mixed together a batch yesterday afternoon, let it rise all night (18 hours), and baked it this morning. My house was around 67 degrees and the dough didn’t rise as much as in the summertime, but the loaf still turned out great. I like letting it rise for the longer time, but I usually just check the dough around 14 hours to see that it is covered with bubbles, smells yeasty, has risen, and darked slightly. Follow the directions as written and you should be pulling beautiful loaves of bread out of your oven on a regular basis!

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Beth M October 16, 2012 at 11:11 am

I just took it out of the oven. It alone could be dinner tonight. It’s gorgeous! I don’t have a cast iron Dutch Oven so I used a hand thrown ceramic bowl covered with foil and topped with a cookie sheet. My dough stuck to the towel. Next time, I’ll heavily flour the towel. Thank you so much for this recipe. It’s going to be my new favorite!

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Emily October 17, 2012 at 2:17 pm

Way to be creative! Love your solution and glad it worked out well. I’ve started using parchment paper on top of the towel, then lightly dusting the paper. That way it doesn’t stick and I don’t have to use as much flour. Hope that helps!

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Erin October 13, 2012 at 9:05 am

I’m so bummed– my dough didn’t rise at all, and I wasted a bunch of bread flour! I followed the recipe exactly. I did comment to my husband, however, that the dough did not look wet and sticky in the beginning. Should I have added more water?

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Radeana October 13, 2012 at 11:45 am

I’m not the writer of this blog, but I thought I’d jump in. I’ve made this a couple of times now and both have turned out wonderful. I followed the recipe exactly. I read other comments of people adding water, but I didn’t. I did stir a LOT in the first step to incorporate all the ingredients. I kept stirring and stirring and finally everything came together.

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Emily October 17, 2012 at 2:28 pm

Is your yeast fresh and your room around 65-70 degrees? Each batch is slightly different. If the dough seems too dry to you, you can add water 1 tablespoon at a time. You don’t want it so wet and sticky that you can’t handle it or form it into a rough ball.

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Jennifer October 11, 2012 at 3:21 pm

I have been baking bread for years and just tried this recipe the other day, it came out perfect!! My only problem was the high temp caused my Dutch Oven to smoke a bit in the heat up stage. I wonder if you have had this problem. I give my oven a thin coat of fresh oil after every time it is used. I also thought the water content a little low, I am going to add in 1 Cup of Sourdough starter to today’s without changing anything else, will let you know how that goes.

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Jen October 10, 2012 at 8:13 pm

Thanks so much for the recipe! It was my first time ever making bread! All was great except it came out super salty. I used tablespoons I stress.. Oops!

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Ibegrandma October 10, 2012 at 5:57 pm

THANK YOU for this great recipe. I’ve made 2 loaves and still have a problem with it being ‘doughy’ in the center. I checked to make sure it was 200 degrees, using a thermometer and still confused. It looks beautiful and the crust is amazing….just too darned doughy. The first time I used the exact amout of water. The second time I added an extra 2/3 Cup. Am I doing something wrong that you might know of? Thanks for any help!

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Emily October 10, 2012 at 8:29 pm

Huh, I can’t imagine what’s happening unless your oven temp or thermometer isn’t accurate. Are you following the baking times and temps exactly as written?

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Ibegrandma October 11, 2012 at 1:01 pm

Yep…followed everything to the “T”. When I went back to read the blog after the 1st one was done I noticed folks were adding more water. So I added 2/3 more on the 2nd loaf. I’m wondering if I should bake it longer…..Gotta make this work! Too easy to fail me now! It’s a BEAUTIFUL loaf so I HAVE to perfect this!

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Regina October 10, 2012 at 1:03 pm

This was so easy to make and delicious! I’ll be making it every week from now on. Thanks for posting it!!

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Eryn October 8, 2012 at 2:36 pm

My first try is in the oven right now. It stuck horribly to my heavily floured towel! Any ideas on what went wrong? I did have to add a bit more water – but I added a little at a time.

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Sally October 8, 2012 at 2:12 pm

Baked this today. I used 3C white & 3C wheat flour and following the rest of the directions including adding the molasses. The loaf is huge! Crisp and crunchy on the outside and moist & chewy on the inside. I will certainly make this again. The only thing I will do differently is to NOT use black strap molasses. It gives a slight burnt/bitter taste. Next time regular molasses. I might also try baking just 1/2 the recipe in a smaller dutch oven.
Overall – 2 thumbs up!
THANKS for a great recipe.

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Valerie October 7, 2012 at 2:19 pm

OMG!! I just made this… it is AWESOME! So very easy.. the hardest part was waiting for it to cool enough to cut! We are big bread people & very picky.. this tops the list!

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Michael October 6, 2012 at 9:25 pm

I’m making this bread for the first time. I decided to experiment with the base recipe…I added in some sharp cheddar cheese, fresh roasted garlic, and Italian seasonings. If it doesn’t go as planned, I’m out a whoppin $2.00 ?!?!

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Emily October 10, 2012 at 8:36 pm

That sounds like a delicious combination!

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Radeana October 13, 2012 at 11:39 am

How did your bread turn out? I’ve been wanting to experiment with some herbs & cheeses.

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Lauren October 6, 2012 at 6:54 pm

Just wanted to say THANK YOU for this awesome recipe! I’ve tried another one before, but it didn’t work out for me – much too wet of a dough. This was perfect on the first try, AND I used a large stainless steel stock pot with no issues (was at my mom’s, and she doesn’t have a dutch oven). I’m planning to make a bunch of half-sized loaves for an upcoming bake sale since this is so painless – might even experiment w/ some mix-ins…

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Emily October 10, 2012 at 8:35 pm

Yay! Glad to hear it. And thanks for the comment about the stock pot. Good to know!

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Alice October 5, 2012 at 6:05 pm

Is it okay to use a 4 Qt. iron dutch oven. Just got a new one for the recipe but didn’t know I needed 6 to 8 qt. size. I can hardly wait to get started.

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Emily October 6, 2012 at 1:43 pm

I’m not 100% positive. Might be too small? You could always try half a recipe first and see what you think. Cut amounts in half, follow the directions as written, and bake at 425 for 30 min. covered 10-20 uncovered (until internal temp of 200 and golden brown crust).

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Dilly Arts October 5, 2012 at 1:01 pm

I just finished baking this. The loaf is currently crackling on the counter and the house smells amazing. Can’t wait to taste it.

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Radeana October 4, 2012 at 7:19 pm

Loved it! Made it on Monday and have used it for sandwiches, garlic bread, and ate it with simply with butter & honey. I’m ready to start another one. Is it absolutely necessary to add molassas with the wheat flour? Just wondering what would happen if I tried it without.

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Radeana October 4, 2012 at 7:25 pm

Nevermind. I do have molassas. Can’t wait to try the wheat.

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Emily October 6, 2012 at 1:46 pm

Great! It would be fine to omit the molasses, if you prefer! Molasses & whole wheat are nice partners, and I like the touch of sweetness with wheat bread. Up to you!

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Karin October 4, 2012 at 8:52 am

Great easy recipe. I have been using for about four years. Try adding 1/4 cup of anise seed and 1 Tbsp coarse ground pepper for a great tasting bread for pasta dinner.

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Esther October 3, 2012 at 6:59 pm

I can’t wait to try this!!! Thank you for sharing! Also, for those of you who have a Dutch oven that does not have a handle that can withstand high heat…here’s a tip; My husband got me a Lodge Dutch oven that was well priced, then bought a Le Crueset knob on ebay and replaced it so that it could withstand higher temperatures. I just thought that was really smart, and much cheaper than going with the more expensive Dutch oven.

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Tony October 2, 2012 at 11:17 pm

Beautifully documented, I’ve been using Lahey’s recipe for years…respectfully if I may your bread looks perfect except for the crumb which looks a little tight. The original recipe is one of high hydration ( at least 75% by weight) and it looks like you’ve cut back on the quantity of water perhaps to make handling easier? In Jim’s original video for the NY Times he’s barely able to fold the dough over a couple of times it’s so wet and this as well as very high oven temp (500 deg +) is the key to getting good oven spring, an open crumb and it not sticking. Best wishes.

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Emily October 3, 2012 at 8:57 pm

Nope, I didn’t change the hydration. I doubled the entire recipe, including the amount of water from Lahey’s book, My Bread. In that, he uses 1 1/3 cups of water. I just checked out his NY Times recipe (which ran in ’06) and that lists 1 5/8 cup of water. Interesting! And I plan to post some better, updated pics of the crumb soon; these do make it hard to tell what it really looks like. Thanks for the comment!

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Rychelle October 2, 2012 at 11:08 pm

Just made this receipe and it turned out picture perfect! I did not however, read the comment about resisting cutting into it before it had cooled (oops) and was a little disappointed. My crust was very thick and hard. I am using my oven on convection. Should I do less time or temp? This was my trial run before making it for my family for thanksgiving (Canada) this weekend so hoping next time it’s perfect. Anyone else have a problem with a very hard, thick crust?

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Emily October 3, 2012 at 8:54 pm

That crust is typical of this type of artisan bread. If it’s not to your liking, you might want to try a recipe for a softer (still using yeast) dinner roll? It sounds like you’re doing it right; hope that helps!

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Carlana October 2, 2012 at 1:45 pm

I tried this with a mix of white and wheat flour. I had to add in more flour. I let it rise for 16 hours and everything went ok until it was time to take it out of the cast iron pot and it did not budge. I baked for 40 minutes then I removed the cover and did it for 5 more. Not sure what happened. At the top it looks so pretty and perfect imagine how my heart sank when it did not slide right out.
That aside, I’m willing to try it again this weekend.

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Emily October 2, 2012 at 2:09 pm

In the dozens of times I have made this recipe, I have had it stick in the pot three times. Two times I added too much water and one time I did not preheat the pot for long enough. I know how frustrating that is. If you run a rubber spatula around the outside and shake the pan, it eventually pops out. But trust me, that is not normal.

For your first time, I would recommend sticking to the recipe as written and see how it goes. If you are still having the problem, let me know and I’ll do some troubleshooting.

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Bethany October 8, 2012 at 12:11 pm

Am I reading this correctly? You need to put the bread in the pot WITH the towel, place it in the oven, then preheat the oven. After it is hot then you take the towel out from underneath and put it seem side up in the pot? Also is it ok I’m using a no stick dutch oven not a cast iron?
Sorry all the Q’s I’m new to baking.

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Brenda October 9, 2012 at 2:39 pm

Bethany, you will put the pot in the oven empty so it can heat up at the same time you are heating up the oven. You want the pot to be hot when you put the dough in it. She then says to slide your hand under the towel( with the dough still on the towel) and flip the dough into the hot pot. I hope I expained it well enough.

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Carolyn October 1, 2012 at 4:25 pm

I made this recipe and it turned out great, but with a few changes (sorry!) because I only have 100% whole wheat flour, and no AP flour in my house. I chose to add gluten for the stretchiness and so it can rise properly.

I halved the recipe because my dutch oven is much smaller (4 qts, I think). I used 3 cups whole wheat flour and added 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten per cup of flour. I had to use considerably more water (probably 1/2 cup more than half of the recipe) probably because of the added gluten and the wheat flour. I also used active dry yeast, and choose to proof it first, because I wasn’t sure it would work without doing this, and I couldn’t tell from the recip eif I should.

With those changes, the bread rose perfectly and is delicious! This was so easy, thank you!

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PattyP October 1, 2012 at 4:20 am

My hub made this yesterday after I found the recipe here and printed it off. Once he had mixed it and left it until the next day, I tucked under the dough, floured the towel, etc. I have to say I am very impressed how easy it all was and how beautifully the loaf turned out. My mouth is watering and I want to taste-test it, but we are waiting to cut right before family arrives for dinner tonight.

Oh yeah, he added another cup of water to the recipe. I thought it might be too wet, but it turned out great – large and puffy, just like the picture. We used 1/2 whole wheat, but not actual “bread” flour.

Thanks so much for sharing the recipe!

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Leslie September 30, 2012 at 7:03 pm

Can I double this recipe & still bake it all together? I am cooking for a group this weekend & would love to make more that the one loaf.
Thanks!!

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PattyP October 1, 2012 at 4:14 am

Leslie, I just made this and the loaf comes out *huge*. You could only double this if you used two dutch ovens, one for each recipe. I would mix each recipe separately if i was making two.

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Emily October 2, 2012 at 2:11 pm

This recipe does make one huge loaf! I served this bread at a big party and baked two loaves, one with some whole wheat and one all white. Just double the recipe and keep the loaves separate through all the steps. You should be able to fit 2 Dutch ovens in your oven at the same time. If you don’t own 2, then bake one and give the second a longer initial rise time (just time it to work with the first loaf).

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Kathleen September 29, 2012 at 10:09 am

I just baked, cooled and tasted this bread and it’s awesome! It’s going into my recipe book for sure.

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Linda September 28, 2012 at 7:25 pm

Sorry, but I have another question. Can you make rolls with this recipe? Again, Thanks……….Linda

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Linda September 28, 2012 at 7:23 pm

Can the dough be frozen? Thank you.

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Dre September 28, 2012 at 10:21 am

I just want to make sure I’m reading it correctly– if using whole wheat flour, use only 3C of whole wheat flour and 3tbsp of molasses in lieu of the 6C of reg flour, yes?

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Emily October 1, 2012 at 9:48 pm

No, you would substitute 3 cups of whole wheat for 3 cups of unbleached. So you still are using 6 cups of flour total. Hope that helps!

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Robyn September 27, 2012 at 12:44 pm

Let me just preface this comment with my bread-baking skills: They’re nonexistent. I’ve ruined everything from breadsticks to cinnamon rolls before… no matter how easy they seemed. This is the FIRST bread recipe I’ve ever tried that’s ever actually baked looking anywhere near the recipe. It turned out beautifully. Thank you so much for sharing! :)

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Stephanie September 26, 2012 at 2:56 am

Thank you so much for this recipe which I tried for the first time today. The texture is similar to ciabatta, which is just what I wanted. The method was really easy – I didn’t seem to have any of the problems with dryness or sticking to the towel that others have had. I halved the recipe – maybe I didn’t cook it enough as it was not as crispy as I expected. I’m looking forward to experimenting with this as a base recipe for other varieties. Cheers from New Zealand!

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Carolyn September 25, 2012 at 8:27 am

This is great, thanks! I was wondering if you (or anyone) has tried with 100% whole wheat flour – maybe I should add vital wheat gluten?

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Louise September 25, 2012 at 4:41 am

Thank you so much for this amazing recipe, my whole family loves it! Easy and gorgeous!

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Anndi September 24, 2012 at 8:50 am

I had to add more water too–To the white flour.
The Rice four recipe didn’t work, no rise at all after 15 hrs.???
Not sure why, afraid to try the oat flour becasue the rice didn’t work.

I cannot have gluten so I guess I need to find another bread recipe for these flours???

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Lynn September 24, 2012 at 9:13 am

Costco, Sam’s Walmart have gluten free flour that I have used in other bread recipes for my granddaughter.

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erykah September 30, 2012 at 10:14 pm

Just came across this recipe and I dont know if it will work but u can also try coconut flour or tapioca flour…both r glueten free. I use those bc I cant have eggs, wheat, or soy..hope it works

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Rita October 1, 2012 at 8:25 am

I’d be interested to see if this works… Please update if you do make it… Thanks

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Trudie September 23, 2012 at 7:30 pm

I was so exited to make this bread, but the 2 2/3 c water was not enough to make a moist dough with the 6 c of flour, I added 2/3 c more water, will see if it rises, help ?

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sarah tuco September 29, 2012 at 12:02 pm

I agree. I have made similar breads in the past but decided to try your recipe. The 6 cups of flour with 2 2/3 cups water was not enough so I also added an additional 2/3 cup water. Hope it works. Any pointers???

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sarah tuco October 1, 2012 at 4:18 pm

Update: my bread turned out awesome by adding the 2 2/3 cups of water!!

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sarah tuco October 1, 2012 at 4:20 pm

Oops…I meant 2/3 cups water extra

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Dannielle September 23, 2012 at 3:37 pm

Thank you so much! Made this overnight and baked today. It looks absolutely wonderful!!!

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Audrey September 23, 2012 at 10:55 am

Is there a high altitude variant that you are aware of?

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Lynn September 23, 2012 at 12:04 pm

I am at
6000 ft. No problems

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Audrey September 23, 2012 at 12:30 pm

Thank you kindly!

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Lynn September 23, 2012 at 12:59 pm

No problem, enjoy!

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Shannon September 23, 2012 at 8:49 am

How will this work with fresh ground whole-wheat flour?

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Tammy September 22, 2012 at 9:24 pm

I have made it with no problems using whole wheat bread flour.

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Anndi September 22, 2012 at 8:38 pm

Can it be made with oat four or rice flour?, I use gluten free foods

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PattyP October 1, 2012 at 4:10 am

I doubt that it would work with non-gluten flour. Gluten is what makes the dough stretchy so the yeast can make the bread rise with lost of tiny air pockets.

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Pamela G September 22, 2012 at 7:24 pm

I was just wondering, do you make or have a whole wheat version of this recipe? That would make me a VERY happy camper! If not I guess I could try it with whole wheat pastry flour?

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Jessica B September 22, 2012 at 7:12 pm

Is it necessary to coat the Dutch oven with something to keep it from sticking to the pan?

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Linda V September 22, 2012 at 6:36 pm

thanks for sharing this interesting recipe and great pictures and details!

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tesla4all September 22, 2012 at 4:52 pm

Thanks for your fine post on a wonderful product!…

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Yvonna September 22, 2012 at 2:59 pm

I grind my own wheat and with adding molasses, can you taste it?

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Billie September 20, 2012 at 9:57 pm

For those having trouble with the bottom being to dark. Try putting something between the pot and heat. You may have put your rack down to accommodate the taller pot, placing the bottom of the pot close to the heat.

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Andra September 19, 2012 at 11:41 am

Hello! I tried your recipe yesterday, and it turned out pretty well! I used half of the amount because my dutch oven is smaller. However, the bread wasn’t very fluffy nor full of holes. I used white whole wheat flour. What would you recommend for getting the nice, airy bread as shown in your pictures?

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Emily September 19, 2012 at 5:03 pm

Whole wheat flour will give you a more dense loaf of bread. Use unbleached white (bread is recommended) flour for a lighter, chewier loaf. You won’t necessarily get a “fluffy” interior with this recipe.

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Lynn September 18, 2012 at 8:36 pm

Made my 8 th loaf today! Wanted to try a different bread recipe on pinterest, but decided to just add those ingredients to this one. 2 T tomato paste, 1/4 c parmesan cheese, up to 1/3 cup basil. Yum! Turned out great and the grilled cheese sandwiches were to die for. Going to try the spinach artichoke grilled cheese tomorrow. Thank you for this great recipe. We all have our favorite varieties!

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Emily September 19, 2012 at 5:00 pm

Lynn, those variations sound so delicious. Thanks for feedback!

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Carissa September 17, 2012 at 8:51 pm

Tried this recipe out two days ago, and I was pretty happy with how it turned out for a first attempt! (Especially because it was my first time ever making bread.)
Just wondered if anyone had tried halving the recipe?? If so, how did it turn out, and what modifications on rising times and baking are recommended??

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Emily September 19, 2012 at 4:58 pm

Yes, Lahey’s original recipe is half this amount. I doubled it to achieve more bread-to-crust ratio.

Cut ingredients in half; follow directions as written. Bake at 425 for 30 minutes, remove lid and bake for another 15-30 minutes (until internal temp is 200 and it’s golden brown).

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Sarah September 17, 2012 at 4:13 pm

I just made this tonight and I have to say…..I CAN’T BELIEVE IT IS HOMEMADE…..It is the best bread I have ever made. Thanks for the great recipe!!

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Cheryl September 17, 2012 at 2:34 pm

Do you have to let it rise in a metal bowl?

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Rebecca September 17, 2012 at 5:06 am

Well i’m a little disapointed with my bread… The bottom was way to hard and i never heard any crackling noises as it cooled.. Any words of advise. Must be 2 Rebecca’s on this site. I did let it raise the 18 hours that it called for?????

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Deborah September 20, 2012 at 5:55 pm

Just finished my first attempt and mine came out the same way Rebecca. Wish someone would post advise. The inside was so good but the outside, especially the bottom is just too hard!!

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Rebecca September 20, 2012 at 6:17 pm

Deborah…. I agree with you….It would be nice to know what to do about this problem…..My bread also had a big hole all the way thru it just below the top crust. I have made a lot of bread in my life and thats why i was so excited to try this one…..

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Emily September 20, 2012 at 9:42 pm

Thanks for the comments, Rebecca and Deborah! This type of artisan bread will have holes in the interior and a thicker, chewier crust. (If you check out Lahey’s book, his crusts are dark and almost charred looking.) To “fix” this problem would take away what makes this bread unique.

That being said, as long as the interior temp is at 200 and the crust is a nice golden brown, pull it out of the oven. Try decreasing your baking time a bit? I also wonder if a sheet of foil under the pot would give you a lighter bottom crust? I’ll try that with my next loaf and let you know.

If that still doesn’t meet your expectations, try a different recipe, like this one for hamburger buns (make in any shape you want) that will give you a thin crust and soft, light interior: http://www.frugallivingnw.com/frugal-homemaking/making-homemade-hamburger-buns-basic-yeast-dough-recipe/

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Rebecca September 22, 2012 at 10:40 am

Thank You for your help…. I will try making it again this week

Rebecca September 16, 2012 at 7:32 pm

I baked the bread today and it turned out great! I love the crispy crust and moist texture of the inside. Thanks for the recipe!

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Rebecca September 15, 2012 at 6:15 pm

Well i’ve my bread dough together at 5pm. Excited to see the out come..The only thing that bugs me is the amout of salt. Guess we will see what happens……………

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Melissa September 15, 2012 at 3:00 pm

Yep, best ever… the kids, husband, and I just inhaled half of the loaf for a snack, we just couldn’t stop eating!!!

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Dee September 15, 2012 at 1:47 pm

Thanks so much for posting this recipe. I just made a loaf and it is easily the best bread I’ve ever made!

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Rebecca September 15, 2012 at 9:17 am

I’m going to try this recipe tonight…..Finally could work out the time that i could spend directly with the process. I’m excited LOL. Let you know how it came out. Going with a few of the reviews also…

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Jen September 15, 2012 at 8:51 am

Just took my first try out of the oven. Its crackling as I type. I caanot wait to try it out. Thanks for the great pictures and amazingly simple steps.

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Fran September 13, 2012 at 1:54 pm

I made this AMAZING bread two days ago after buying a 4.5 litre enameled cast iron casserole (did not have one and needed an excuse) which was on for 60% off! The bread was ready to put into the pot when I got home, but I thought was a bit small for the recipe. I baked 3/4 of it in the new pot and 1/4 in a small heavy stainless pot I had.. The bread was half whole wheat and half regular flour and when it came out of the oven we could not wait to let it cool to have it with some chicken soup we were having for supper. We tried the smaller loaf and it was the best bread I ever made according to my husband. The crust was crunchy and the texture of the bread was nice, similar to the photo. We tried the second loaf yesterday and my son also said it was the best bread he had ever had – need I say more! I plan to try this with different flours (may try 1/4 rye, 1/4 whole wheat and half white flour next) and caraway on outside (my husband is of German descent). Will also try sesame.

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Cathy September 13, 2012 at 1:14 pm

I wonder if there’s any way to make this in a loaf pan? Thanks!

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Debbie September 13, 2012 at 11:08 am

Could this bread be made in a bread machine?

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Missy September 13, 2012 at 10:12 am

I can’t wait to try this recipe. We are a family of 5, which includes 2 teenage boys! This will definitely help our budget!!! I did have a question though….Have you tried any other versions of bread other than wheat? For instance gluten free bread, bread made with arrowroot flour, or sour dough?

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katie September 12, 2012 at 7:27 pm

I have a 3 quart dutch oven and a glass dish with a lid that is a similar size/shape. Would I need to make any adjustments on baking time/temperature if I need to divide the dough into two loaves to bake separately?

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Emily September 12, 2012 at 7:35 pm

The original recipe by Lahey is half of this recipe. He calls for baking it at 475 (I prefer 425) for 30 min. Then take the lid off and do 15-30 minutes more.

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Diane September 10, 2012 at 7:17 am

Emily, Can you give me the recipe for the smaller size you spoke of. I made this and it is teriffic, but I would like to make the smaller size
Thanks!

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Emily September 12, 2012 at 7:57 pm

No problem! For a smaller loaf, just cut these measurements in half. I would bake it at 425 for 30 minutes with the lid on, then 10-20 minutes with the lid off. Look for an internal temp of 200 and a golden brown crust to know when it’s done. Happy baking!

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Dawn September 7, 2012 at 9:55 am

I just saw your comment about higher elevations maybe not needing as long to rise. I live in a high elevation and have been giving it about 18 hours. I did read your instructions about the bubbles, etc., but guess I didn’t realize that meant to not keep it rising after seeing bubbles. Duh! :-)

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Dawn September 7, 2012 at 9:48 am

I love this bread – however I am having problems with the dough, such that I dread making it. When infinish stirring the dough together, it is fairly dry. However, after it rises and ferments for 18ish hours, it is SO WET I can barely do anything with it. I put flour all over my hands, and the dough still sticks to them like crazy, as well as to the bowl. It’s very difficult to get it out of the bowl and there is no way I can turn the edges under. Then, I flour the towel pretty heavily but the dough still sticks to it. When I finally get it into my cast iron pot and bake it, it is WONDERFUL though – sigh… Help??? (also, I am an experienced bread maker)

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Annette September 6, 2012 at 4:16 pm

do you have to prep the oven or the lidded pan? I have only used my cast iron lodge twice. thanks.

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Lynn September 6, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Light oil with paper towel before and after keeps it from rusting. Don’t wash in soapy water! Enjoy!

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Heidi September 6, 2012 at 9:57 am

Can I add sugar to this recipe? My grandma’s raisin bread recipe has sugar in it. I honestly don’t have the time or patience to make her recipe,but I’ve had incredible success with this recipe. Most recently, we made “everything” bread with dried onions, garlic, poppy and sesame seeds…

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Emily September 12, 2012 at 8:03 pm

I have added molasses but not sugar yet. I’m sure it would be fine! It would add some sweetness, and I’ve also read a comment saying it produces larger pockets/bubbles in the bread. Makes sense! Let us know how it turns out!

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Ivonne September 5, 2012 at 3:12 pm

These looks so fabulous! I have never baked bread before, and I tried two times these recipe, but I can not make it wright. The first time I thought I measured bad, the second I realized that there is something wrong because I had the exact same outcome: the dough is like “melting” and it’s not as sticky as I think it should be, I can’t even form a ball after the first rise. I live in Mexico city, which is really high, I don’t know if it has something to do. Can you please help me??

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:19 pm

If you are in a higher, warmer location your dough will rise faster. Adjust the rise times accordingly. It’s best to go by smell and sight rather than be get stuck on exact times. I tried to include as many of these hints as I could (smells yeasty, darker color, large bubbles, etc.) so I hope that helps! Also, don’t be tempted to add too much extra water if it looks dry. This can result in dough that is too wet. Once you are trying to form your ball, use well floured hands and work quickly. Hope the third time’s the charm!

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Ivonne September 7, 2012 at 4:21 pm

Thank you very much! I will try that way, cause the dough it’s too wet after the first rise, it won’t even take form, I’ll let you know how it goes, thanks again!

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Rachael September 4, 2012 at 7:34 pm

I tried making the dough tonight and it was SO dry. Like, I couldn’t even get all the flour mixed in. I threw it out after adding more water and then it was too watery. Anyone else have this problem and/or what should I do different so it’s not dry dough? I KNOW I used the right amount of flour…

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:25 pm

Stick with the amounts and try it again. You could always knead it by hands a few times or add just a tiny bit more water, too, if that helps the dough come together. Once it sits for 12-18 hours for that first long rise, it will make a big difference. When I first started making this bread, I thought the same thing: It’s too dry! I added more water to get a wet dough, and it stuck to the pot. Not cool. So give it a shot as written the entire way through and see what happens!

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Brooke September 3, 2012 at 12:20 pm

First off I want to say this is amazing bread, so easy and cheap! And it tastes like $5 expensive bakery bread.

Just wondering, you could probably make these and freeze them right? I wonder what the best way to freeze would be.

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:30 pm

Thanks for the comment! That’s great!

For freezing… I bake the bread as directed, cool it, wrap it in foil, then slide it into a reusable plastic bag. The trick would be finding a big enough bag… Maybe cut the recipe in half if you want to freeze it? Then I just slide the foil-wrapped loaf into a hot 350-degree oven while I’m making dinner, 30ish minutes. It should be hot and ready to eat with the rest of dinner!

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Brooke September 6, 2012 at 5:48 am

Awesome, thanks for the freezing help!

I just made loaf #2 in one week. I can’t get enough of this stuff. Thanks so much for the easy, delicious recipe!

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Mary September 3, 2012 at 7:11 am

I have my mom’s old Dutch oven which has a glass lid. Would it be safe to use a glass lid at that temperature?

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:32 pm

Good question! Is there any way you could check the temp rating for that pot/lid? Is is still sold anywhere?

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Carrie November 13, 2012 at 10:01 am

I use an enamel 5 qt dutch oven, and it has a glass lid. It works beautifully! I have to break myself the habit of peeking in the oven to see how the bread is doing through the lid! But the lid does just fine.

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Lynn September 2, 2012 at 5:52 pm

Can’t have salt, I don’t use it and it is awesome! Use herbs-, rosemary, basil, whatever, they all come out good!

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Renea September 2, 2012 at 10:17 pm

Thank you for the info, Lynn. I will try it!

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Renea September 2, 2012 at 5:50 pm

My husband is on a low sodium diet. Is there any way to cut the salt without risking the integrity of the bread? This sounds so good!

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Bart September 2, 2012 at 9:32 pm

I use either salt substitute – potassium chloride (KCl) or the Lite Salt which is half sodium chloride and half potassium chloride. Both work equally well.

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Renea September 2, 2012 at 10:16 pm

He can’t have the salt substitutes because the medication he is on raises his potassium levels. I think I will try it without salt. Thanks!

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Mary September 2, 2012 at 10:53 am

I have my mom’s old Dutch oven which has a glass lid. Would it be safe to use a glass lid at that temperature?

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Gina September 2, 2012 at 4:37 am

I don’t have a dutch oven, can I make this in something else?

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:34 pm

Any large, heavy lidded pot would work as long as it is rated for higher temps, in the 425 range.

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Gina September 1, 2012 at 10:14 pm

I don’t have a dutch oven, is there another way I could make this?

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Lynn September 2, 2012 at 2:18 am

Cheap on amazon and use it for lots of other meals! Pays for itself in a month!

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Fran September 13, 2012 at 1:49 pm

I made this two days ago, and bought a Le Creuset type enamel cast iron pot that was 4.5 or 5 litres. I used 3/4 of the bread dough in this as I was not sure if the pot would be a bit small, and the other 1/4 dough I put in a small lightly oiled stainless steel saucepan with a lid. It turned out just as nice as the bread in the heavier pot. It baked faster as it was a smaller loaf. Make sure the handle and lid can go in the oven – mine was all stainless steel.

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Jamie September 1, 2012 at 7:56 am

I have ZERO experience in making bread. And I LOVE cooking! That being said, this is the easiest and most delicious recipe EVER. I felt so proud of myself when I opened the oven and found a big, beautiful golden brown loaf in there just waiting to be eaten by my friends & family. THANK YOU for sharing this recipe! If my mother had never found it and share it with me, who knows, I may have never tried to make bread (OH NO!) I’m not sure if I can ever go back to store bought bread again! I encourage everyone to try this recipe for themselves, it’s too delicious not to.

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Celeste Harned August 30, 2012 at 12:04 pm

I NEVER comment on recipe posts because I’ve never found one that after attempting the recipe I didn’t want to make some major alterations.
Until now!
This is absolutely fantastic. I never would have attempted homemade bread before I found this recipe on Pinterest and now I’m so glad I did.

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Emily September 5, 2012 at 9:38 pm

I am the exact same way, Celeste. Glad it to hear it worked out so well for you!

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Alicia August 30, 2012 at 10:28 am

This is sitting on my countertop, ready to be sliced up tonight for dinner (paninis). My house smells so good! The recipe was so simple and took very little active time. My bread slid right out of my le creuset 5 qt dutch oven when the bread was finished, no oiling necessary.

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Angie August 30, 2012 at 8:34 am

When I did the original stirring of the measurements, mine was not wet and sticky. It was wet enough to get the dough to form, but almost on the dry side. I’ve checked and rechecked the measurements and I did them right, but obviously I did something wrong. Is the flour supposed to be sifted first? Maybe there was too much flour because I didn’t sift it?

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Bart August 30, 2012 at 10:37 am

Angie;
Several factors are involved with the moisture in dough. Other folks might say their dough came out too wet. It depends on the moisture or humidity on your kitchen. If you live in the deserts of Arizona then you probably have low moisture content in your flour. Add a tablespoon of water at time to your recipe. If you add a tablespoon of water next time and if it still seems that the dough is dry, and you don’t want to waste the dough, add another tablespoon. If you can stir it, fine, otherwise knead it lightly, just enough to get the moisture into the dough ball. Over time and with the yeast doing their thing the moisture will spread through the dough.

BTW, when I did the wheat version (I posted above) I ended up with 3 cups liquid and might need more. I live in Northern California and on the day I did this it was hot and dry.

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@patrickarcement August 22, 2012 at 3:36 pm

5 STARS! I really enjoyed this bread. I used it with Honey and meatballs.
My family was very impressed. Thanks for having this here – this will be a part of my family dinners for a long time to come.

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Billie August 21, 2012 at 4:16 pm

I have never attempted to make bread outside of a bread machine. Today (started last night) I made your recipe. My husband has used the WOW word over and over again while eating it. Thank you for sharing a recipe easy enough for a beginner and good enough it will become a staple in our house.
The recipe caught my eye due to the usage of the dutch oven. My bread was cooked today in a 50+ year old dutch oven that belonged to my husbands Grandmother (just one of the many we own). We love to cook in them camping using briquettes for heat.

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Cheryl August 21, 2012 at 9:37 am

Has anyone used a clay pot to bake this loaf? I don’t have a dutch oven, but I do have a romertopf type of clay pot. Do you think I can use that? Other sites have had mixed reviews about how to use the clay pot for baking bread. Some say the top and bottom must be soaked in water for 15 mins. Some say don’t soak at all. I am a little concerned about preheating the clay pot so I might skip that and adjust the baking time.

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Cheryl August 23, 2012 at 11:39 am

I tried it. I made 1/2 the recipe so that I would have a smaller loaf. I used my 3 quart romertopf clay pot. I might have been able to use the full recipe because the lid would have left plenty of room to rise, but I decided to play it safe with the smaller amount. I went ahead and put both parts of the pot in the oven when I preheated it. I did not pre-soak the pot. I was a little concerned that the wet dough would be too cool and cause the pot to crack so I placed the dough on to parchment paper and then put it in the bottom of the pot. I made the recipe with 100% whole wheat (with some gluten and honey as suggested). It had a great flavor, was real moist and my family loved it. I would still like to get bigger airy holes in the loaf, but I may not be able to get that without using more or all white flour. Anyway, the romertopf clay pot worked fine!

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Lynn August 23, 2012 at 11:42 am

Try 1/2 t of sugar for larger holes

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Bart August 19, 2012 at 10:51 pm

My ovens are deep 12″ (12 qt.) ovens for camp cooking. Too big for this so I used one of the Springform pans I keep as a nested set in one of the ovens. Comes out of the oven easily and I didn’t have to buy a smaller one.

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cris August 19, 2012 at 10:18 pm

COOKS magazine or Americas Test Kitchen has the same method. But like another commentor you use parchment paper and eliminate the towel. The prportions are different but it dies make great bread.

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Bart August 19, 2012 at 4:21 pm

Finally made the craisin and walnut wheat version. Rally good bread. Here are my ingredients:
3 c. unbleached all purpose flour
3 c. whole wheat
6 tbls. Saco’s Buttermilk Powder
3/4 c. chopped walnuts
3/4 c. craisins
2-1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. yeast
2-2/3 cup water plus 1/3 cup honey for total of 3 ups liquid**
**If I do this again I am going to up the liquids to 3-1/3 cups – maybe more water/honey mix.

I had two concerns about this bread – with ‘no knead’ I wanted that nuts and craisins to be distributed somehow. So, as always, I whisked all my dry ingredients together first, then I whisked my liquid together, then I stirred them together. This dough was a little dry but the bread is great. Because it was dry I did several folds at the first, not necessarily kneading, but about 8 folds.

I was scared the long rise might let the yeast eat the sugars from the craisins, but that was not the case. The crust was thick and maybe a little chewy because I have this really bad habit of basting the top with melted butter just before the end. I like the texture – good even crumb.

Full 18 hour rise at 80F. Remember that the wheat version will not rise as far or as fast. I had to keep telling myself that.

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Rebecca September 13, 2012 at 7:50 pm

Try some Vital Gluten. It helps the riseing action because of the Wwheat Flour. I got mine at Walmart………….

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Skye August 19, 2012 at 10:52 am

What size dutch oven is that?

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Lynn August 19, 2012 at 5:47 pm

5 quart. I bought mine on Amazon, $29.00, no shipping with prime membership. Lodge, cast iron with cast iron knob on top. WEasy to clean! Then, with left over bread I made chicken and stuffing in the same dutch oven!

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Tim Colman September 22, 2012 at 10:12 am

Thanks!

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amandaelles August 19, 2012 at 10:51 am

What size dutch oven is that?

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Kimberly August 18, 2012 at 4:42 pm

Has anyone made this using 100% whole wheat flour (all 6 cups)? What modifications were needed?

I’ve recently embraced the clean-eating life style and white-flour is a big no, no!

Thanks!

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Emily August 18, 2012 at 5:24 pm

Hi Kimberly! I’ve made this with 100% whole wheat flour several times. I just substitute 1/3 a cup of the flour for 1/3 a cup of vital wheat gluten. You can add molasses if you want, I haven’t. You may need a hair more water, but it should be ok. I also cook it in my bbq that has an external temperature gauge. I cook it the exact same way, but it doesn’t heat up the entire house. Hope this helps!

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Kimberly August 18, 2012 at 4:42 pm

Has anyone made this using 100% whole wheat flour (all 6 cups)? What modifications where needed?

I’ve recently embraced the clean-eating life style and white-flour is a big no, no!

Thanks!

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Lynn Blackburn August 18, 2012 at 12:32 pm

Made a loaf with rosemary and sunflowers, and after a few days made stuffing with it- yum! Just finished making a loaf of tomato basil (subbed 2/3 cup stewed tomato juice for the water) and with melted cheese it is like tomato soup with grilled cheese sandwiches! Sooo easy,love this recipe!

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Lynn Blackburn August 18, 2012 at 12:31 pm

Made a loas with rosemary and sunflowers, and after a few days made stuffing with it- yum! Just finished making a loaf of tomato basil (subbed 2/3 cup stewed tomato juice for the water) and with melted cheese it is like tomato soup with grilled cheese sandwiches! Sooo easy,love this recipe!

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Amy August 18, 2012 at 10:05 am

Made this for the second time today. So easy! The first time i made the whole wheat version, It was very good, but the bottom was a bit tough. I searched a few other sites and found some good ideas. Crinkle a bit of foil and smooth it out to fit the bottom of the dutch oven and do the second rise on a piece of parchment paper cut a bit larger than the pot. You can even cut longer pieces on the end to use as handles to lift out the bread when it is done! This worked great and there was no sticky towel to wash! Love this recipe, I am hooked!

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Adrienne August 16, 2012 at 9:40 pm

I entered a loaf of this bread in our local county fair (along with sheep) and WON!! Not only did I win, but a gentleman (also entering his sheep) won the same award for the exact same bread!!!
We found it interesting that we both won the Washington State Wheat Grower’s assoc award for the same bread and were sheep growers as well :)

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Emily August 19, 2012 at 10:05 pm

Love it! Thanks for sharing. :)

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deborah crowe September 1, 2012 at 6:40 am

did u marry? maybe the stars aligned.. <3

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Adrienne September 2, 2012 at 11:00 pm

HAHA, already married :)
Also, use sesame seeds on the cloth, yum!!!

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Lauren August 16, 2012 at 4:34 pm

gosh I feel so idiotic asking this, but in the recipie, what does T stand for? tablespoon or teaspoon? I’m new, please forgive me!!

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Beth Miller August 16, 2012 at 7:15 pm

Lauren, the only way to know something is to ask, believe me I know that from years of asking.
a lower case t is always teaspoon.

Hope this helps and I made the recipe today and it is great!

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Beth Miller August 16, 2012 at 2:00 pm

I made this bread for the first time today and all I can say is, WOW!
I make bread often with a sourdough starter recipe but this is better and much simpler. The only issue I had was the bread stuck to the well floured towel but it didn’t seem to matter to the end results.
I even bought a 7 qt cast iron Dutch oven just to make this recipe and it was well worth the money. YUM and thanks.

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Amanda August 14, 2012 at 5:45 pm

Can you add Rosemary and other spices into the dough, or would it alter the results?

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Melissa August 14, 2012 at 2:22 pm

Hi!
I love this recipe and I’ve been using it for a while now. My husband loves rye and wanted me to try it out using this recipe. The first time, I used all rye flour….way too strong! So, I tried again, and it was perfect! I make smaller loaves (3 c. flour) so, I do a 1:2 ratio. One cup of rye to every two cups of unbleached all purpose flour. I also add one TB of caraway seeds. This is such a great and versatile recipe! Anyone can do it and it really impresses my friends and family! :)

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Lynn August 14, 2012 at 10:41 am

How about some tips for high altitude? I am a mile high and didn’t rise quite like I wanted. Also, love ol

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Lora August 13, 2012 at 5:09 pm

I put the dough together last night and when it was ready, I cut off a hunk and spread it out to experiment with it as a pizza crust. This made a delicious Pizza Margherita! My husband absolutely loved it. Can’t wait to get the bread baking, but I’m waiting for my daughter to deliver her Dutch oven. I wanted to borrow hers instead of investing in one before I knew if I could do this, or not. If the bread is anything like the pizza, I will be buying one making this regularly. Thanks!

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Bart August 13, 2012 at 4:56 pm

If you want to make any bread taste richer use some Saco’s Buttermilk Powder. In this recipe I would start with 6 Tbls. and adjust from there.

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rena August 13, 2012 at 4:21 pm

Finished making this today. Unbelievably easy, baked up with a beautiful crust and crumb (I live at 7000 feet and had to bake this for 70 minutes), but it’s lacking something in the flavor. Maybe a touch of sugar or a bit more yeast? It’s rather flat. Also, I didn’t oil the pot. Big mistake. It’s stuck firm.

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Marcia Goldman August 13, 2012 at 9:41 am

I recommend making your own artisan gluten free flour mix from a book my Peter and Kelli Bronski. The piecrust is incredible and the gf flour is worth putting together.Should do a GRAND bread.

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Bart August 13, 2012 at 5:52 am

As a rise time reference – I made this wonderful recipe and I subbed 2 cups whole wheat for 2 cups of the unbleached all-purpose flour. I added 1/4 cup honey. I whisked the dry ingredients first. After stirring in the water and honey I felt the dough was ‘unformed’ which is my way of saying it looked a little dry. I didn’t add anything but I did fold it over about 8 times then started the rise in a bowl sprayed with Pam.

My kitchen started at 79F and went to 82F over the 13 hour rise period. I kept looking for the dough to get “Darker” but it didn’t appear to darken at all. What I DID see as I looked closely were the many bubbles just ready to burst through the dough – because of the wheat flour you have to really look for these – but they look like the un-popped bubbles on a pancake just before you flip it.

That dough rolled right out of the bowl. I did fold it again 4 times and then did the tuck but it came out just as smooth a ball of dough as you have ever seen. Another rise of 2 hours. After baking the bread had the most uniform grain to it and disappeared in a day. ‘Course one of the eaters is our son, a 21 year old U.S. Marine, sooo….

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Tim August 13, 2012 at 4:25 am

This recipe is so good. I have made it several times to rave reviews and I have passed it on to several people. Really good as cinnamon toast. Thanks for making a baking idiot look like a master.

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Quina August 10, 2012 at 3:18 pm

Ok, This bread is amazing! First time ever making bread of any kind and it came out perfect.

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Bart August 10, 2012 at 12:16 pm

Adding ingredients to make different types of bread –
To those of you adding ingredients – when and how do you add the ingredients in the process?

At the beginning by stirring it in? After the first rise by kneading or folding them in?

I am thinking of making the whole wheat variety with craisins and chopped walnuts. Any thoughts as to when best to add?

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Tammy August 10, 2012 at 7:39 pm

I added my ingredients (except the jalapeno which I put on the outside of the bread) at the time I mixed it all up. When I used the steel cut oats I toasted them a bit before I added them at someone else suggestion. When I used jalapeno I put it all over the outside on the second rising.

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Bart August 10, 2012 at 10:11 pm

Thank you, Tammy. I think I will try adding the ingredients at initial mix, as well. Will leave results here.

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Tammy August 10, 2012 at 10:50 pm

Love the idea of walnuts and craisins! Keep us posted on how it comes out :)

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Bart August 10, 2012 at 12:14 pm

To those of you learning how to bake bread…recipes are nearly exact in the amount of ingredients… but the timing and temperatures are merely guidelines. (Well, I DO use a thermometer to check for doneness.)

Room temperatures vary in my house by up to 15 degrees in a day. That is huge for a rise of 10+ hours.

Oven temperatures vary also – I check my oven for accuracy using a digital thermometer and I check it at 300F and at 450F to see if or how it varies. In my case, even with a “digital control panel” I find the actual temperature is 5 to 7 degrees warmer than the control. It’s what you get when you work with mechanical stuff.

Go with the descriptions of when the rise is done and you will probably not have an issue with the “slimy, runny mess”. If you are seeing free liquid on top of the rise my bet is you went too long.

A suggestion might be to print the recipe and make notes – for instance the room temperature when you set the dough to rise – especially if you make it during different seasons. I take pictures of my bread baking – so I have a visual reference for it. The neat think about this recipe is you don’t have to learn the feel of kneading (though I enjoy it, actually).

Anyway, thoughts on when in the process it is best to add ingredients in this recipe? To those of you adding ingredients – when and how do you add the ingredients? I am thinking of making the whole wheat variety with craisins and chopped walnuts. Any thoughts as to when best to add?

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Bart August 10, 2012 at 12:08 pm

To those of you adding ingredients – when and how do you add the ingredients? I am thinking of making the whole wheat variety with craisins and chopped walnuts. Any thoughts as to when best to add?

To those of you learning how to bake bread…recipes are nearly exact in the amount of ingredients… the timing and temperatures are merely guidelines. (Well, I DO use a thermometer to check for doneness.) Go with the descriptions of when the rise is done and you will probably not have an issue with the “slimy, runny mess”. If you are seeing free liquid on top of the rise my bet is you went too long.

A suggestion might be to print the recipe and make notes – for instance the room temperature when you set the dough to rise – especially if you make it during different seasons. I take pictures of my bread baking – so I have a visual reference for it. The neat think about this recipe is you don’t have to learn the feel of kneading (though I enjoy it, actually).

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Tammy August 10, 2012 at 11:44 am

I have made it with Steel cut oats, wheat berry and even a jalapeno cheese variety. It is awesome!

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Susan August 10, 2012 at 11:28 am

Just made this today for the first time. I used 2 cups of white whole wheat flour and 4 cups of bread flour. After the overnight rise, it was very wet as some have said. I kneaded in enough more flour to give it more body, then proceeded as the recipe says. It came out great! Can’t wait to add herbs etc another time.

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Tammy August 10, 2012 at 8:56 am

Mine doesn’t pour out and it is sticky too. I have to put both hands in and pull it away from the bowl and then fold it over and put it on the floured towel. It sticks on the side but not enough usually to worry about.

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Tess August 10, 2012 at 8:19 am

Hi –

I’ve got this bread on the second rise now and am SO excited to try it! I bake bread all the time – in my breadmaker. I’m really looking forward to trying this one without the breadmaker.

One problem though – when I tried to “pour” it out of the bowl it had risen it, it was SOOOOO sticky and a lot of it got left in the bowl. Should I have greased the bowl before I put the dough in it? I just used the same bowl I mixed it in… should I have used a different greased bowl?

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Gail August 8, 2012 at 7:21 pm

Another way to ease it into the hot dutch oven is to let is rise on a piece of parchment paper that has been cut to fit in the bottom of the dutch oven with a nice edge to grab to slip it into the hot pan. There are just two of us at home now, it’s easy to reduce the size of the loaf to meet our needs. Thanks for sharing.

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Dawnette August 8, 2012 at 4:16 pm

Anyone try gluten-free flour yet? And if so, how did it turn out? I’d love to hear feedback about this…:-)

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Adrienne August 8, 2012 at 10:54 am

May I add yet another tip…I ran out of cornmeal one day and used sesame seeds to keep the dough from sticking to the towel…oh man!! Use it all the time now!!

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Jen August 8, 2012 at 9:52 am

Absolutely Fantastic! I made the mistake of not reading all the comments before I started this, so I was using the suggested time for the first rise… not a waste, but VERY wet. After the 2nd rise, when going to put the bread in the pot I realized the dough had stuck to the towel…. again, not a problem, just got as much off as I could, covered & baked. Hardest part BY FAR was waiting for the cracking noises to stop so I could eat it! I’ll never use another bread recipe again! Thank you!! Next time I’m going to add some herbs, maybe some cheese… then, maybe cinnamon and brown sugar…. I can see no dieting is in my future!

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Brittney August 7, 2012 at 2:29 pm

I made this bread over the weekend and I have to say that it turned out beautifully! I even liked the long rise time as I was able to make the dough, leave it over night and then have the smell of fresh baked bread in the morning. Next time I’ll let it brown more at the end for a bit more of a hard crust but a fantastic recipe nonetheless!

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Anna August 7, 2012 at 1:01 pm

I would just like to say that I have now done this bread 3 times and it has come out insanely wonderful every single time! I found your step by step tutorial very helpful. I know this is going to be a staple in my house from now on!

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jacque August 5, 2012 at 11:06 am

I just made my first loaf….it was wonderful…thanks

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Deborah August 5, 2012 at 9:00 am

If the bread is getting too dark just cover it with a cloth to finish cooking .

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Angie August 4, 2012 at 7:56 pm

I was making this today- I originally used Mother Earth News’ recipe, but I remembered yours was roughly doubled and wanted to give it a shot since my dutch oven is bigger than the one called for and my loaves were always done long before the time was up. I added some whole wheat flour and was REALLY tempted to add some quinoa I had in my fridge for extra texture… but have never just “thrown” in quinoa with yeasted breads… any thoughts? Should I use it as a substitute for flour, or just add it in like you would herbs, cheeses, etc?

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Erin August 4, 2012 at 8:25 am

I have never made bread before, so perhaps maybe I just don’t know how to do it correctly..I followed this recipe to a T, and after 12 hours, i turned the bowl over it is a watery, slimy, runny, mess. I just put it back in the bowl & covered it again…. Is there anything I can do to save it??? Help please!!

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Sheila August 5, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Erin, see comments above on over-proofing. I am no expert but my experience has been that once the dough sits too long what you experienced happens. I have had limited luck saving it so just start over. Not so say you couldn’t try by adding more yeast and some flour to get it back to a stiff/sticky consistency.

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Giovanna August 3, 2012 at 12:33 pm

Hi! My family owns a bakery in Italy but when I moved to the States I missed the good family bread! I found this recipe almost one year ago and I LOVELOVELOVE it. I just want to let you know that if you dont have a dutch oven, you can cook the bread in a normal pan, I use a big one for pizza with no boarders so that the bread “feels free” to grow into the shape it likes! So as I was saying I cook it into a normal pan, for about 30-45minutes (it depends on the loaf) in a preheated oven at 400 degrees and I put in the oven a bowl (metal or pyrex) with some water and I leave it in there for the whole time (since I start preheating until I turn off the oven). The humidity helps the bread to get the nice golden color and keeps the humidity constant, this is a baker trick! Every one should try to make this bread even if they don’t have a dutch oven!

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Kasandra August 3, 2012 at 8:38 am

The bread is delicious but mine definitely burned! I had a hard time getting it out of the pan. I baked at 430 for 45 minutes and then 5 minutes without the lid. Next time, I’ll set the temp lower and only bake 40 minutes. Otherwise, amazing!

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Sheila August 5, 2012 at 6:31 pm

I set my oven at 420 based on other comments and 50 minutes covered and 5 minutes uncovered gave an excellent golden brown loaf. The type of pan that you are using (cast iron, cast aluminum or something else) will also have an impact. I used a cast aluminum pan. Experiment and you will quickly figure it out.

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Rebecca August 2, 2012 at 10:20 am

Ok, I tried this and I was so excited. I followed the recipe exactly and let it rise for 14 hours. When I turned the bowl over to put it On the counter it was a watery, runny mess. :( I didn’t have any cling wrap to cover the bowl, but the my mixing bowls have lids so I used that instead. Was that a mistake?

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Joie August 2, 2012 at 11:49 am

Could be it over-proofed. I find in the summer it doesn’t take as much time. Try 10-12 hrs.

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Sheila August 5, 2012 at 6:29 pm

I would agree with Joie’s assessment.

I made this for the first time last night/today and only let it rise for about 9-9.5 hours. Go more by the look and smell described than time. The temperature outside and in your house will make a big difference. With experience in making bread, you will figure it out!

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Rachel August 2, 2012 at 1:10 am

Sounds easy enough….thanks for posting! So, if I want to use whole wheat flour, am I supposed to use 3 cups whole wheat and 3 cups all purpose flour? Or just 6 cups whole wheat flour…along with the molasses…? Thanks for any tips…I’m a novice!

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candy August 1, 2012 at 7:18 pm

will glass cookware such as corning ware work instead of the cast iron?

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Amy August 1, 2012 at 7:04 pm

I just made this tonight, and I am seriously dying, it is so good!!! I have never baked my own bread before, other than banana and zucchini bread. I will never buy it again. Love it toasted with butter and strawberry preserves. Absolutely amazing, I cannot thank you enough!

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Michelle August 1, 2012 at 6:27 pm

Since I have posted, initially I have used my baking stone with wonderful success! I have tried LOTS of pinterest bread recipes and this one is by far our favorite. Especially love it as it doesn’t have the yeasty taste like some that require so much more yeast. Has anyone tried making it in a loaf pan? That may be my next experiment! Thanks for sharing this recipe …. I think I’ll be using it a lot!

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Erin August 4, 2012 at 12:29 pm

do you put a pot of water in the oven when you bake it?

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Emily August 9, 2012 at 3:43 pm

No need! The dutch oven (or lidded pot) traps all the steam (moisture released from the bread while baking), giving you that crisp crust that some recipes achieve by spraying or placing a container of water in the oven. Hope that helps!

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Sheila August 5, 2012 at 6:27 pm

Do you let it rise the second time on the stone or do you still put it in a towel, preheat the stone and then “flop” the dough on the preheated stone?

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Suzanne August 6, 2012 at 1:18 pm

Sheila, I think the official way to do it is to let it rise on a pull (a big flat wooden paddle) with some cornmeal/wheatgerm/flour underneath it and then slide it onto the stone when it’s ready. The stone is preheated in the oven.

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Nancy August 1, 2012 at 6:11 pm

Thank you so much for putting this recipe out there, Kim! Like another person who commented, I’ve tried a few bread recipes from Pinterest. This is the only one that turned out good and the whole family enjoyed it. I’d love to try it with Rye or by adding herbs. If anyone has tried this I’d love to know.

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Melissa August 14, 2012 at 2:25 pm

Hi!
I love rye! I tried it using a 1:2 ratio. One cup of rye for every 2 cups of regular flour. I also added 1TB of caraway seeds. It turned out great!

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katie October 18, 2012 at 6:18 pm

i tried it with rye flour (same 1rye:2white ratio) but i also added 3 tablespoons of brown sugar which gave it a sweet malty undertone! really good. my german housemate said it reminds her of bread from home.

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Ali July 30, 2012 at 4:59 pm

I made this tonight and it was so wasy and tasted incredible!

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Emily July 30, 2012 at 1:26 pm

Hey! I have made this bread 5 different times, I think it’s fool proof! I make it in my bbq that has a temperature gauge on the outside so it doesn’t heat up the whole house. I have made it 100% whole wheat, while exchanging 1/4 cup of flour with 1/4 a cup of vital wheat gluten. This was also in the bbq. Thank you so much! I make a loaf almost every day! ( The bbq cook times and temps are the same.)

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Shannon July 30, 2012 at 10:54 am

The bottom of my loaf gets too dark. I have adjusted rack height and temp with no luck. Suggestions?

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Valerie July 29, 2012 at 9:51 pm

Do you know of any changes for high altitude? I live above 5000 ft. and some recipes need a slight modificaion.

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Emily August 1, 2012 at 2:50 pm

No modifications are needed. Your rise times will likely be faster, but the recipe gives you a nice, long window so you should be fine! My sister made this recipe as written at 8,000 ft. with no problems. Hope that helps and happy baking!

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Larra July 28, 2012 at 9:56 pm

I made this with the white flour last week. I loved it, my husband loved it and my son loved it. SCORE! I mixed it with 3 cups wheat flour this time and the suggested molasses. I’m curious. Why molasses when using wheat flour?

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Emily August 1, 2012 at 2:53 pm

It’s not necessary, but we think the molasses flavor goes well with the heavier wheat flour. Adds a nice sweetness to a denser loaf. Feel free to omit it if molasses isn’t your thing!

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Laurilyn July 28, 2012 at 6:09 pm

Made this today. It was a huge hit! I can’t wait to experiment with adding herbs to the bread. I made the dough yesterday and let it sit overnight and baked it this afternoon. I WILL be making this one again. Thanks!

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Sam Jamieson July 28, 2012 at 8:45 am

Yay! I was so excited to watch my bread raise and bake and look like restaurant style bread!
I substituted 3 cups of white flour for the whole wheat flour and found I needed a bit more water – is that correct or did I measure wrong? Also, the crust was a bit chewy – is that a result of using the wheat flour?
Thanks for your great blog – I love pictures :)
Blessings,
Sam

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Emily August 1, 2012 at 2:57 pm

Sounds like you did everything right! Every now and then I add a bit more water or flour, if the consistency of the dough seems a bit off. It always comes together as it rises, though, so it’s hard to go wrong with just slight adjustments.

The crust will be crisp when you first pull it out of the oven. After the second day, it will be more on the chewy side.

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Cassi July 27, 2012 at 9:42 pm

I’m going to try this with my gluten free flour, I’ll let you know how it works. I really, really miss bread. Especially good bread. Also wondering if you’ve ever added herbs, minced garlic, etc, and with what success. I can’t imagine them changing it much. Also, I’m going to halve your recipe, what size dutch oven did it originally call for? I’m guessing 3-4 qt? Thanks for sharing, I can’t wait to try it.

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Emily August 1, 2012 at 3:00 pm

Lahey’s original recipe (half of this one) was developed using a 4 1/2 – 5 1/2 qt. pot. Something in that range should work just fine!

Also, I have added cheese, herbs, and roasted garlic with great results (as I am shaping it for the first rise on the towel)! This recipe is open to creativity!

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Rita Lockwood August 1, 2012 at 4:09 pm

Have you tried this yet? I miss BREAD and real pizza!

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Diana August 3, 2012 at 8:02 pm

Question for Cassi: Did you try it with your gluten free flour? How did it turn out?

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Michelle July 27, 2012 at 7:39 pm

Have you ever used a baking stone (with a pan of water on the lower shelf) instead of a dutch oven?

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Karin August 9, 2012 at 9:18 pm

Yes, Michelle. I use a baking stone with my grilling pan just below it. I fill it with about 2 cups of water and preheat the oven. Then I add another 1-2 cups of cold water just before putting the bread in and I do my best to trap the moisture in the oven. You can NOT preheat Pampered Chef stones but some others you can but I would check the manufacturer. I make this recipe into french baguettes with the stones and it is fantastic.

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Melissa July 26, 2012 at 4:19 pm

One more question. I bought a dutch oven today, didn’t pay attention to the size of the DO you put in your recipe. The one I bought is 5 quarts & that’s the only one they had at Walmart.

Will a 5 quart still work? I can look around for a 6-8 quart. I haven’t opened the DO yet, I can always return it. It seemed like a good buy @ $35 something

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Emily July 27, 2012 at 2:59 pm

That’s a great price. I’d hang on to it and give it a shot. If it turns out to be too small of a pot, you could always cut the recipe in half for a smaller loaf.

Take this advice with a grain of salt, though, as I have a serious weakness for Dutch ovens… :)

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kim goodlett July 26, 2012 at 3:43 pm

Do you put any oil in the Dutch oven?

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Emily July 27, 2012 at 1:58 pm

Tamara & Kim – No, you don’t add any oil to the Dutch oven. The preheated pot will give your dough a nice crust that will pop right out of the pot at the end of the baking time.

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rena August 13, 2012 at 4:18 pm

I recommend oiling the pot. I used a Le Creuset, and while it baked up beautifully, it stuck fast to the bottom.

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Tamara July 26, 2012 at 8:34 am

Do you need to grease or spray the cast iron pot before inserting the dough?

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Peg Miller July 25, 2012 at 10:06 am

Just gotta say it… found your recipe on Pinterest and if you look at how many bread recipes are on my Breads & Dessert board, you would be shocked. I have probably tried at least 10 of them and NEVER had success… until this one! Not only did it work, but it is TO DIE FOR! I substituted one cup bread flour for one cup whole wheat and added a tbl of molasses as you suggested, and WOW! I am so excited to finally have succeeded at making my own bread. I am now finally encouraged, instead of discouraged. I was about to give up but NOT NOW. What is funny is that my dough stuck to the towel and about a cup of it ended up staying there. After I got the dutch oven in the oven, I scraped it off the towel, made a ball out of it, let it rest for 20 minutes or so, and put it in a small cast iron skillet. I stuck in the oven for about 10 minutes AND WOW! It was as good or better then the original … in other words, this is almost fool proof. Thanks for sharing.

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Paula July 25, 2012 at 9:18 am

Just put mine in the oven. Didn’t have a dutch oven or oven safe pot, so I threw it on my pizza stone. We’ll see what happens!

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Tammy July 25, 2012 at 10:26 am

Keep us posted!

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Beth July 24, 2012 at 11:34 pm

I just took mine out of the oven. I listened to you…it is a work of art! Thanks.

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Brittany July 24, 2012 at 3:20 pm

Mine is in the oven right now. I’ve been looking for a good bread recipe. We love homemade bread but it’s really a pain to make even if it’s every couple of days. Other than the waiting times, my total invested time is maybe 10 minutes. So easy compared to traditional breads. I too found this on Pinterest. If this comes out half as good as I’m thinking, I can live with making this every couple of days. It’s that easy. My house smells amazing right now.

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Brittany July 24, 2012 at 5:33 pm

Oh my word!! This was the best bread ever!! My whole family LOVED it. Thanks for posting!

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Adrienne July 24, 2012 at 12:34 pm

Here are my answers to your questions, everyone has some different experiences, but…
I put my bowl (any type, I use a 2 qt.stainless steel bowl
into my oven and leave it overnight and well into the morning with the light on, that brings the temp up to near 95 degrees, also, no bugs, drafts, etc.
I cover the bowl with cheap Dollar store shower caps, they come in packs of 8-10, and are reusable.
For the cloth you will need a smooth linen or cotton cloth, color doesn’t matter, just as it is smooth (no terry)
For BEST results you will need a cast iron dutch oven with a heavy lid. It doesn’t matter if it’s domed or flat, but cast iron gives the best results. Others here have used many things and feel free to experiment of course, but the CI does it best. And no, the heat will seal the dough with a crust and it will not stick, so no need to oil (it will only smoke up your kitchen when you take the heated lid off to put in your ball of dough.
Cast iron dutch ovens or CIDOs are expensive. New can be as much as $50, but, compared to Le Crusets at hundreds of dollars it’s a bargain! And it will last a lifetime, several!!
Have fun!!

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Melissa July 24, 2012 at 5:38 pm

PERFECT!! Thank you so much!! My towels are terry, so I will pick up some smooth ones. Can’t wait to get what I need to give this a try. Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you!!

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Melissa July 24, 2012 at 11:00 am

I am SO excited to have found this recipe. I made some sour dough bread @ a friends house earlier this summer & all the kneading just stressed me out too much. I cannot wait to get a dutch oven to give this a try. Do have a few questions though….

1) We keep our AC set around 70-72, that makes for a deliciously cold house (which I love), but might not be best for rising bread. Would that alter the rise time of the bread? We have crickets, spiders, ants in our garage, I’d suggest putting the bread on top of our freezer out there to you, but the bugs. Perhaps inside my mini van?

2) Do you suggest using a metal bowl for the bread to rise in? I don’t own any, can you tell me the size of the metal bowl you use?

3) Should I get a white kitchen towel like the one in the picture to wrap the dough in to rise on the counter? All my kitchen towels are thick & solid colored.

4) Should you use only this kind of dutch oven to bake the bread in, or would one of those Le Creuset kinds work just as well? Also if I bought a black one like yours, does it need to be “seasoned”? Can you tell me the size of dutch oven to buy?

I know, I know, these seem like really strange questions to ask. I just really like to be prepared! Thank you so much. I hope you can help me.

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Mary July 24, 2012 at 2:49 pm

I let mine raise in a plastic bowl covered with plastic wrap. My ac is set on 70. I mixed the dough at 6PM and took it out of the bowl at 1PM the next day-19hours. I don’t have a linen towel so I used a cotton dinner napkin for the second raise. It worked like a charm. I have a Martha Stewart Dutch Oven-the cheap version of Le Crueset. It was perfect!

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Melissa July 24, 2012 at 5:33 pm

Thank you very much!

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Katie July 24, 2012 at 9:04 am

Have you ever tried to make this bread gluten free? If so, what do you change and how does it turn out? I would love a good recipe for GF.

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Sue July 24, 2012 at 7:42 am

Love this bread! A favorite at our house. Only, the recipie I use has a couple tablespoons of sugar (for a smaller 3 cups of flour loaf) and the bake time is 27 min. with the lid on and 15 with it off. I’m going to try your bake time to see if that helps with the crust thickness…? I do like it with a bit of sugar in it though…:)

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Tiffany July 23, 2012 at 11:09 am

My dutch oven can only tolerate 375 degrees because of the handles…could I use a turkey roasting pan with the same results?

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Samantha July 24, 2012 at 11:52 am

Tiffany, I made this bread today using a turkey roasting pan. It worked great! It is the perfect golden-brown.

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Emil July 23, 2012 at 7:03 am

This bread looks amazing! Fluffy and crunchy and tasty. Wow – I have to try this next weekend!

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Mary July 22, 2012 at 5:09 pm

I made this bread today and followed the recipe exactly. It is fabulous! I just couldn’t believe it would work. The loaf is absolutely gorgeous and it tastes yummy. It popped right out of the pot and Emily was right about how neat it sounds as it cools. I can’t wait to toast it for breakfast in the morning and I think I will make it again next Saturday for a french toast breakfast next Sunday. I am so glad I ran across this on Pinterest!

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debbi waits varnell July 21, 2012 at 10:08 am

Im with Sally M .can you make this gluten free ??? thanks so much . its a little hot
here in arkansas 1 02 up !! ygh !this fall for sure if I can make it gf !!

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Sally Mathis July 20, 2012 at 6:40 am

Any suggestion to make this gluten free..which type of GF flour may work best?

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Jen July 19, 2012 at 7:46 pm

Hi! I found this recipe via Pinterest and am really excited to try it because I have made it before, but this recipe doubles the ingredients, which means twice as much bread in one go (mmmmm).

I have made a slight variation of this recipe (that uses 1 T vinegar and 1/3 cup lager beer) that had a very helpful trick: on the second rise, instead of using a floured cotton towel, take about 24″ of parchment paper, place it on top of a frying pan, spray the middle with cooking spray, and then put the ball (seam side down) on the parchment paper. My bread didn’t really turn into a ball – it kind of poured/plopped onto the pan. (the recipe was half of this one and recommended a 10″ pan, so I used a bigger one for this batch). Lightly spray the top with cooking spray and cover with plastic wrap and let rise for two hours. Preheat the Dutch oven as per usual, and when it’s time to put the bread in, take off the plastic wrap, lightly flour the top and using a sharp knife, draw it 6″ across the top and about 1/2″ deep. This will give you a nice ‘seam’ across the top of the bread when it’s done. Take the edges of the parchment paper and use them as ‘handles’ to lift the entire loaf of bread, parchment and all, into the Dutch oven, letting the paper hang over the sides. Cover the lid (the paper should be hanging out) and bake as usual. When the bread is done, use the parchment paper to lift the bread out.

I’m assuming this doesn’t affect the actual baking of the bread – mine turns out wonderfully, albeit sometimes the edges are a little ‘bent’ where the parchment paper pushed in on the bread, but I haven’t had anyone complain about that. :)

Thanks for the recipe – mine is on the second rise now, can’t wait to eat it for dinner!

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christine July 19, 2012 at 1:22 pm

My 9yr old son and I just pulled our first loaf out of the oven. We can’t
wait to taste it! It looks awesome!

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Kate July 19, 2012 at 5:10 am

I am very eager to try this recipe. What amazes me is that I am not finding any reference to oil in this bread…am I missing something? Do you need to oil the dutch oven?

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Emily July 22, 2012 at 7:36 pm

No oil is needed in the dough or the oven! This will give you a different texture than doughs with butter or oil. It is very similar to an artisan, bakery-style bread. Enjoy!

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Tammy July 17, 2012 at 2:37 pm

It is Fahrenheit :)

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Inez July 17, 2012 at 1:48 pm

Hi, just discovered this recipe, just one question though, is that 425 degrees fahrenheit or celcius (I live in Europe, we use celsius) ? 425 degrees celsius is extremely high and ovens usually go up to 245 degrees celsius over here.

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Kate July 17, 2012 at 10:06 pm

Fahrenheit. That would be high in celsius! :)

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Inez July 18, 2012 at 10:28 am

that’s what I thought too, but I wanted to be sure, you never know :)
thanks!

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kiyomi July 16, 2012 at 8:39 pm

I wanted to share with those who want a whole grain, wheat-free alternative. Although not gluten free I use whole spelt flour with slightly less water using the Artisan bread in 5 minutes a day recipe and then use the dutch oven method to bake it. I put a piece of parchment in a bowl when it rises (no 2nd rise) and then carefully and quickly lift it into my piping hot cast iron dutch oven. I put the lid on and bake it for 20min at 450 and then uncover it and bake for 15min. It was super moist and tender and 100% Whole grain. Lovely!

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Leslie July 16, 2012 at 8:39 pm

Hey.. I tried this recipe yesterday evening, through today and baked it today. It is my first EVER attempt at bread and turned out perfect! Shell is chewy, the inside soft and fluffy with a little density that is just perfect, almost like sourdough. I enjoyed it and got a belly ache after it LOL

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Emily July 18, 2012 at 8:52 pm

Sweet! Glad your first attempt turned out successfully. Keep it up!

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patricia July 16, 2012 at 6:37 pm

i made my bread exactly by the recipe, but the inside was not done, it was sticky, what did i do wrong?